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Rock Climbing : Comments

Comments by holdplease2 (21)


Article: Link Cam Editorial Review
I cannot say enough good things about these cams. I've taken them up 2.5 walls and had them on my rack for every pitch of crack climbing I've done since January of '06. The trigger wires are fine and the action is like new. I no longer carry my C4s from green to gold, I carry two red and two green OP Link Cams instead. For pods, flares, and anything from fingers to cupped hands (girl sizes) these things are unbelievable. Crack jumaring/speed weapon on walls? There's nothing better. I paid full retail for my four Link Cams and will be buying two of whatever size comes out next. Go OP!

Article: Link Cam Editorial Review
The extended parts of the lobes of the cams may be in *contact* with the rock, but due to their orientation to the axels, there is zero force applied to them and they are doing nothing.

To prove this, just weight the cam in a crack by sitting on the sling. Now feel free to move all of the lobe parts that are not lined up with the axel around with your fingers. The only part that is pressed against the rock creating holding power is the part that is alligned with the axel.

If the additional hinged lobes are not "pressed" against the rock by your bodyweight and contribute nothing to holding power.

-Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
If anybody has any other questions about my experience with these cams, I'd be happy to answer them here. Post up! :) -Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
112: Wow, that's a great question, and the answer is even better! The outside lobes on the metolius face left while the outside lobes on the alien face right. This is important for the hard-to-get placement, and all the more reason to have a set of these hybreds to compliment the hybred aliens. Each MFR only makes the taper go one direction...and it turns out that they compliment one another in this way. -Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
Hi Jeremy - You'd have the same problems with these in a parallel placement that the normal cams have in a hybred placement. One set of lobes would be good, the other would be at too wide an angle. Basically, if you climb in mostly parallel areas like Indian Creek, these might not be for you. However, if you climb a ton of pin scars or rock with alot of irregularities, they could make for more secure placement than just using a regular cam with one set of lobs cammed sub-optimally. Hope this helps. -Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
Hi 112: I thought it was a good question. I am betting that if someone really wanted to go out of their way they could contact CCH and have some "mirror" image hybred aliens made. Possibly the same from Metolius, but I don't know. They are very customer service oriented over there.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
Hey Chossmonkey: Great comments on the cam stops, thankfully, I didn't get to test them like that. ;) When Vegastradguy and I were on the phone last week he compared the lobe widths on the three camming units. I do know that the Metolius lobes are slightly wider than the Alien lobes, probably bringing overall surface area closer to the same. Also, BD made an extra-fat center lobe for this very reason. John, do you have any comments for Nate?

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
Make that Hopefully a screamer. BTW - Check out the "Shock Absorber" by Mammut for a screamer alternative. They use spectra and nylon and are much smaller and lighter than the Yates "Screamer." I carry a few as quick draws, they're hardly more bulk than the big petzl quickdraws with "Petzl" written on the dogbone. -Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
And anyone longing for some larger offset cams...think about trying some OP LINK cams. They work awesome in flared placements, as one set of lobes can be contracted much further than the other. I swear by these things and they have replaced my camalots green thru gold on my rack. -Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
Hey Guys: Crotch brings up a point. If I look at the wear marks on the lobes, they are decidedly to the outside edge of the lobes. If you want real contact from the lobes in these placements it would be best if the axel holes were drilled at an angle. That would be asking a bit much, though, and might impact trigger pull. But it makes sense. -Kate.

Article: Cirque Pro Editorial Review
There are shoes that are designed for bigwalls, and they have the features that are listed at the beginning of the review. To have these features, you end up with a boxy, bulky toe and a shoe that isn't sensitive. It also can end up being heavy, as its designed for real durability challenges.

In the case of this shoe, they wanted a sensitive shoe with a low profile toe for stuffing into cracks. They also wanted a lightweight shoe. Therefore, they sacrificed some of the reinforced areas and rigidity and stability (for heavy pigs/packs) that might be found in a more wall appropriate shoe.

I, for one, am glad that La Sportiva, Scarpa, and Five Ten make shoes that perform very well in some environments and that they are willing to sacrifice "all around" performance in some shoes so that we can have more specialized models.

You don't wear your shit kickers to the prom and you don't wear your flips on a glacier. Burly wall shoes and technical approach shoes can be just as different if you have the budget for a pair for each purpose.

If you don't have such a budget, find a shoe that balances your requrements of weight/burl, free climb ability/rigid stability, rubber stickyness/durability. There are plenty of models to choose from.

I didn't like the lacing system of this shoe, in part because the round laces came untied, so I had to double knot. Then I ripped the shoe off and on my foot without untieing, which resulted in some tearing at the heal. Kinda my fault, kinda the fault of the laces themselves sucking. I'm sorry I didn't mention this in the initial review. I forgot about it after the first four months with the shoe.

Check out the La Sportiva web site for about 15 models ranging from burly wall to trail running to their even more technical approach shoe. They have more options than any other company.

BTW: Avoid the superdrago---tons of exposed stitching...wore through in the time it took my Cirque Pro's to get resoled, only three weeks! Of course, they are designed to be lighter weight and do have mesh construction. Again, its all about balancing your priorities. Wheras the Cirque pros are at about 6 months on J-tree rock and still going strong thanks to the burly rand that covers much of the exposed stitching.

Article: Cirque Pro Editorial Review
The 5.10 guide tennies seem to rock. They hold together way better than the Mountain Masters, which I believe are now discontinued. The 5.10 guide tennie and the Cirque Pro are a simliar shoe, with the guide tennie appearing to be a little more supportive.

The Sportiva B5 has very little padding or rigidity, and is closer to a climbing shoe than the Cirque Pro. They now come in two colors, so you don't have to look like a dork in red shoes. For long approaches they would be less comfortable than the Cirque Pro. I have not worn them, but examined them closely and talked to a few folks who own them.

-Kate.

Article: Cirque Pro Editorial Review
Hi Jay - Allz well. At the time of the review, I also purchased the Super Dragos. However, they are no longer in production so we didn't post that review.

-Kate.

Article: Cirque Pro Editorial Review
Hi climbingbetty:

At this point, La Sportiva hasn't offered us a pair, and I have two good pairs of La Sportivas right now, one of which I paid full retail for. Unless a bootycrew member needs to buy a pair and does a free review (happens all the time) or La Sportiva offers us a pair, we prolly won't have an official review.

However, there are frequently awesome reviews done by other Users of rc.com, so maybe somebody would be willing to post one up?

I must admit to being tempted to try the B5 after my SuperDragos and Cirque Pros wear out. But based on the durability of my Cirque Pros, I think they'll last a few more resoles, so it'll be awhile before I shell out more coin. But when I do, I'll post a review.

John? Any chance La Sportiva will be sending along B5s? You might really like them, they look great for easy free...

-Kate.

Article: Cirque Pro Editorial Review
Hi Krusher4: Thank you for posting that information. Do you mean that the 1/2 inch wide section of leather that the laces run through, instead of holes, wore all the way through?

I'm just confused, because it seems like the only place where pulling a lace pulls on actual leather is not prone to wear. If you look at the pic of the shoe in the review, where did the leather break?

I, too, have noticed some questionable leather quality in 5.10 shoes. But in this shoe, it seems that the laces rub on the laces when cinching down tight except for at the very top, where there is a metal grommet in what appears to be nylon.

Thank you so much for posting this.

-Kate.

Article: Riff Daypack Editorial Review
John, you could use the bottle openers on Root Beer, you know! Awesome review, a great example for the rest of us. I think I'm gonna get one of these packs!

-Kate.

Article: Metolius Offset TCU Editorial Review
Hey Peter:

Thank you for the head's up. Actually, one of the mid-sized ones was missing from the set we recieved, so I had the largest ones. I would have carried them all if I had them. :)

If I had to choose one or two for the typical trad rack/climber, it would be the second from the largest and the largest, if you climb in areas with pin scars. These fit perfectly in the scars left by popular sizes of angle pitons, making them useful. Also, they fit in tips/finger crack constrictions, which are frequently popular sizes for climbing.

The smaller sizes are quite good if your specialty is super-thin climbing with barely any pro, or if you really find your self fiddling with super-small gear on your rock type. As in...if you always carry a bunch of small or micro nuts on your rack and find yourself using them alot, you might really like these cams. They are about the size of the black and blue aleins, which are frequenlty not included in free racks because climbing that thin isn't what people tend to do.

I hope that this helps, and thank you, again for the PM heads up!

Kate Robertson
773.255.3638

Article: Black Diamond nForce Editorial Review
Hi Friends:

Sorry for the delay in responding, I was out climbing. :)

Regarding rope wear, I have not seen evidence of this. I've climbed one route with these ascenders (17 pitches, cleaning 1/3 of the pitches, hauling all of them) on a Mammut Supersafe, which still looks brand new. Mostly because the rope *Kicks Ass*.

The other wall was climbed half on my Partner's (Pass the Piton Pete's) rope and half on the above supersafe. Haven't seen any weird wear.

I could imagine that the outward pointing teeth might wear slightly more when scooting the ascender up the rope. However, John and BD are right, the teeth aren't nearly as aggressive as those on the petzl ascenders. This means that when they grip the rope they penetrate into the sheath fibers less overall. I would bet that its a wash...maybe a little more wear when scooting up the rope, maybe a little less when clamping down.

I haven't found the ascenders to be more floppy, other than the slight "nosedive" effect if you don't keep a little pressure on with your palm, as mentioned in the review.

After my first wall with these, I wasn't totally dialed. I only jumared four of the pitches, though. I had my doubts. However, after two walls, I prefer them to petzl. They take some getting used to, from the standpoint of the thumb/finger trigger action, and you have to do it right...pull with your trigger finger and bump with your thumb.

I'll keep an eye on this thread and would love to answer further questions on these sweet ascenders. Thank you for sending the questions along!

-Kate.

PS - Kim, I have a massive garage (so lucky!), and two of the three walls are peg board, with all of my gear arranged by brand and size, with the carabiners organized by type and function. My ropes each have their own rope hook. Its pure heaven. :)

Article: Black Diamond nForce Editorial Review
Hey ASU climber...

It TOTALLY rocks at this. Because you can move the cam with your forefinger on the trigger without contorting your hand, it is simple as pie. Doesn't require the "Thumb Reach" of the Petzl ascenders. Its kinda second nature and veeeery smooth.

However, due to the outward pointing teeth, you have to ascend just a bit higher before you can stop manipulating the cam and have it just slide up the rope based on the rope's weight alone.

Hope this helps,

-Kate.

Article: Black Diamond nForce Editorial Review
Ok, sorry to hear that...I don't have a Kong autolocker, but it works on my fatty lockers, so I figure it works on enough that you can find something that works well.
So a caveat - There may be some larger biners that won't clear.

Thank you, hotgemini.

From another hot gemini. ;)

-Kate.

Article: Sterling Ion Editorial Review
After wobbling around at the OR show and checking out every rope there, this is simply the most striking thing out there. No more ol-skool argyle looking ropes, or the solid color ropes that end up looking filthy after a few pitches. This is a unique pattern, which yields an absolutely beautiful cord. Of course it performs, but IMO, as long as its not a Petzyl Zephyr your rope will probably perform just fine. I know looks don't matter, but this rope is the first one that did make it matter for me. Its that hot. They look like they're made of velvet. -Kate.