Forums: Climbing Information: Accident and Incident Analysis:
Death at Rumbling Bald
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Accident and Incident Analysis

Premier Sponsor:

 
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


healyje


Jul 8, 2011, 1:16 AM
Post #26 of 29 (1678 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 22, 2004
Posts: 4199

Re: [JAB] Death at Rumbling Bald [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

JAB wrote:
sungam wrote:
Shit, that sucks. Really, really sucks.
But isn't frosted flake only like a 50/60 foot route? Am I mis-remembering?

I think this is a good example of why these accidents happen. Many seem to think that knots at the end of the rope are unnecessary on short routes. Nothing could be more wrong.

Knots might be a backup to screwing up being at the middle of the rope, but at best they are just that - a backup to the real problem of an uneven rap, the problem that needs to be addressed and not glossed over because you tie knots.

There are many situations where not tying a knot is a good idea, but "it's just a short rappell" is not one of them.

Hmmm. I quess I fundamentally don't really buy into the knotted end deal. I do on occasion when I feel circumstances warrant it, but that is by no means a majority of the time. What I do believe strongly about is insuring you are rapping off the middle of the rope 100% of the time - even on short routes. One end may end up hung up somewhere, but you won't rap off the end of one side.

The failure to employ some means of insuring you're rapping off the middle of the rope - be it marks, hand over hand from the two ends, or a bipattern doesn't matter - but some surefire means should always be employed regardless. These uneven rap accidents simply shouldn't be happening and certainly not with this frequency or clustering.

Just saying 'tie knots' doesn't directly address the basic problem of an uneven rap rope. Address that problem by going hand-over-hand from the two ends, a bipattern rope, or an ppropriate middle mark - whatever so long as you have a reliable method of insuring you are rapping off the middle of the rope.

Focusing on knots is like focusing on the splice in the 'spliced webbing' thread when the focus should be on the fact the anchor wasn't redundant against a single component failure.


(This post was edited by healyje on Jul 8, 2011, 1:23 AM)


socalclimber


Jul 10, 2011, 4:40 PM
Post #27 of 29 (1566 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 27, 2001
Posts: 2436

Re: [healyje] Death at Rumbling Bald [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

healyje wrote:
'Training', such as it is these days, may play some role in uneven rappel rope accidents among newer climbers, but doesn't account for the experienced climbers who are part of the recent cluster of uneven rap accidents.

Before sport climbing and gyms 'training' was a matter of mentoring; the demographics these days don't support that model anymore so it's more books, internet, and guides. Don't have any thoughts on a solution to that (that anyone would like).

I'm equally at a loss to explain this cluster among experienced climbers as it's such an easy situation to avoid. 'Complacency' is an easy answer, but I suspect an incomplete one.

P.S. Example from today's news of how deadly falls can be - this one at a baseball game trying catch a ball: http://www.mercurynews.com/top-stories/ci_18436166

The mentoring concept is one of the things I think that is critical to the accident rates. New climbers are mentoring new climbers. It did not used to be that way. Basically, it's the blind leading the blind.

Guiding certainly isn't the answer either. Simply because it depends on the guide and what they teach. Plus the fact, you only have the client for a limited time.


ibeforee


Jun 28, 2013, 9:21 AM
Post #28 of 29 (1073 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 28, 2013
Posts: 1

Re: [healyje] Death at Rumbling Bald [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (6 ratings)  
Can't Post

Has been almost two years since this happened. The man who died was my brother. I miss him terribly. Still have a hard time coming to grips with the fact that he is really gone. I've read everything written about the accident that I can find, and contacted those who first responded to try and gain some sense of closure. He was an excellent climber and loved what he did. Please always check your ropes and equipment, no matter how experienced you are or how many times you've done the route. Accidents will happen, but for the sake of your families and loved ones please do everything within your power to stay safe out there - even it if means checking things three or four times before a climb. The time spent checking and re-checking might just save your life. Josh was my only sibling, and an amazing friend and brother. I hope others can learn from what happened. He is, and will always, be missed.


Syd


Jun 28, 2013, 2:57 PM
Post #29 of 29 (1000 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2012
Posts: 300

Re: [csproul] Death at Rumbling Bald [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

csproul wrote:
http://carolinaclimbers.org/...h-rumbling-bald.html

The link no longer provides much in the way of details. The account of the accident was removed from the post at the request of the deceased's family.

I've lost a lot of friends and the feelings can be terrible. However we can all learn from such accidents, so there's less chance of them being repeated. Removing details of an accident helps no one. I read every accident report I can lay my hands on. Safety can only come through knowledge.

This accident seems especially curious because an 80' crag is very common and well within the reach of most ropes.


(This post was edited by Syd on Jun 28, 2013, 3:03 PM)

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Forums : Climbing Information : Accident and Incident Analysis

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook