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Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks
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bearbreeder


Nov 2, 2012, 3:00 AM
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Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks
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http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/..._climbers_have_f.php

im not sure whether the victims were "rock climbers"(not that it matters) ... but since it involves hazards close to crags, specifically mentioned sports crags, ill post it up anyways

it looks like relevant information to those climbing in the area ...


gblauer
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Nov 2, 2012, 5:39 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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super scary!


edge


Nov 2, 2012, 7:20 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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That's an incredibly flippant article considering that someone has passed from a bee attack.

Heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of the deceased.


jbone


Nov 2, 2012, 7:42 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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Camelback Mtn was the site of the very first few Phoenix Bouldering Contests, but those area's are now cluttered with houses and you can't climb there without the chance your gonna get chased out. As a result the majority of climbing that happens here is on the longer north facing walls which also is the perfect place for the bees to make their hives.

The expansion of the city has chased these bee's up Camelback to the only places they can thrive. We don't want to see people hurt but its the unknowledgable hiker who gets themselves in these situations. In Arizona, its common knowledge that the bee hives have been Africanized in our state and when you encounter them you must take it seriously even if it means abandoning your climb or hike that day. Those hikers or climbers who assume these risks in the face of danger are not making responsible decisions and as a result someone died.

This particular episode happened to a set of hikers not climbers, who were unfamiliar with the area and unwilling to appreciate the danger of bee's. It sucks when people die but short of putting police officers on the trail this will happen over and over again because people don't always make the right decision.


dynosore


Nov 2, 2012, 8:16 AM
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Re: [jbone] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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jbone wrote:
Camelback Mtn was the site of the very first few Phoenix Bouldering Contests, but those area's are now cluttered with houses and you can't climb there without the chance your gonna get chased out. As a result the majority of climbing that happens here is on the longer north facing walls which also is the perfect place for the bees to make their hives.

The expansion of the city has chased these bee's up Camelback to the only places they can thrive. We don't want to see people hurt but its the unknowledgable hiker who gets themselves in these situations. In Arizona, its common knowledge that the bee hives have been Africanized in our state and when you encounter them you must take it seriously even if it means abandoning your climb or hike that day. Those hikers or climbers who assume these risks in the face of danger are not making responsible decisions and as a result someone died.

This particular episode happened to a set of hikers not climbers, who were unfamiliar with the area and unwilling to appreciate the danger of bee's. It sucks when people die but short of putting police officers on the trail this will happen over and over again because people don't always make the right decision.

Did I miss something? What did they do that was such a bad decision? It's not like they were up there poking a nest with sticks, they were out hiking.....


Partner cracklover


Nov 2, 2012, 8:26 AM
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Re: [edge] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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edge wrote:
That's an incredibly flippant article considering that someone has passed from a bee attack.

Heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of the deceased.

It's a blog (aka free reporting, aka garbage).

My condolences as well.

GO


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Nov 2, 2012, 8:29 AM
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Re: [dynosore] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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dynosore wrote:
jbone wrote:
Camelback Mtn was the site of the very first few Phoenix Bouldering Contests, but those area's are now cluttered with houses and you can't climb there without the chance your gonna get chased out. As a result the majority of climbing that happens here is on the longer north facing walls which also is the perfect place for the bees to make their hives.

The expansion of the city has chased these bee's up Camelback to the only places they can thrive. We don't want to see people hurt but its the unknowledgable hiker who gets themselves in these situations. In Arizona, its common knowledge that the bee hives have been Africanized in our state and when you encounter them you must take it seriously even if it means abandoning your climb or hike that day. Those hikers or climbers who assume these risks in the face of danger are not making responsible decisions and as a result someone died.

This particular episode happened to a set of hikers not climbers, who were unfamiliar with the area and unwilling to appreciate the danger of bee's. It sucks when people die but short of putting police officers on the trail this will happen over and over again because people don't always make the right decision.

Did I miss something? What did they do that was such a bad decision? It's not like they were up there poking a nest with sticks, they were out hiking.....

If that "article" is accurate, they were soloing a climbing route.

GO


jbone


Nov 2, 2012, 9:31 AM
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Re: [Gmburns2000] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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I'd hope not to many folks are wasting their time in deep discussions with people who are unwilling to stand by their word.

Still, I'm willing to talk more about how the bee's on Camelback Mtn are a direct result of our overpopulation in the Phoenix area. The bee's would not be so aggressive if we did not overtake their habitat on a daily basis and intrude upon their livelihoods. Bee's are responsible for pollinating our crops and greatly improve crop yields as a result, yet we build our houses over their homes with no regard for them whatsoever. People wonder why without looking at themselves first. I can go on and on...


sonso45


Nov 2, 2012, 10:25 AM
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Re: [jbone] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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From reading the blog and talking to folks on scene, they were hikers on the George Route, a mostly 4th class exposed hike well off the main trail. Bees have been active in that area of Camelback for years. People have been rescued and died in the same area several times. I stay away from certain routes because of them. They become less active in the cold, which isn't often in Phoenix.

One thing that may help to survive an attack on facial openings would be a mosquito net/head cover. Another would be to avoid killing or disturbing any of the bees and leaving the area immediately.

My condolences to the young man's family.


(This post was edited by sonso45 on Nov 2, 2012, 10:26 AM)


wonderwoman


Nov 2, 2012, 10:58 AM
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Re: [Derek_Doucet] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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Folks - this is a highly moderated forum, and a topic that unfortunately involves fatality. Picking apart grammar or having a dispute about the quote function does not really belong in this thread and such posts have been hidden.

Please be respectful. People have lost their lives here.

Much sympathy for those who have passed away in this particular bee incident and others.


(This post was edited by wonderwoman on Nov 2, 2012, 11:05 AM)


USnavy


Nov 9, 2012, 1:57 AM
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Re: [gblauer] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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I am not surprised, I had to downclimb a route in South Dakota this season as I was being attached by wasps. I reached the first bolt and a ton of wasps popped out of a pocket and started attacking me. Being that the landing was dangerous, I had to downclimb 15 feet to run away while being attacked - it thoroughly sucked ass.


raystern


Nov 21, 2012, 3:13 PM
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Re: [cracklover] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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I wrote the article in question. No need to put "article" in quotes, because it is indeed an article. It's also not garbage, which should be obvious because it's the reason for this thread.

The family's loss in this situation is a horrible tragedy and my heart goes out to them. I could see how the article could be viewed as "flippant" if it had been written by someone with no knowledge of free-soloing or the area. But when I talk about the climber's anti-bee kit, I'm being 100 percent serious. I've free-soloed George Route to within 10 feet of a beehive (possibly the same beehive from which came the bees that nailed those poor kids). The Phoenix Parks department confirmed for me that the three young men had climbed up the first part of George Route. My free-solo four years ago took me much higher and further west. I am honestly concerned about what a free-solo climber might do when attacked by bees at Camelback or anywhere else. When I suggested swimming goggles and a face mask, I'm not being flippant -- I'm seriously considering taking those things when I go adventuring again at Camelback. I have to admit, though, this tragedy has taken away some of my zeal for free-soloing at Camelback.

Ray


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Nov 26, 2012, 9:00 AM
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Re: [raystern] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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raystern wrote:
I wrote the article in question. No need to put "article" in quotes, because it is indeed an article. It's also not garbage, which should be obvious because it's the reason for this thread.

Since I was the person who both put "article" in quotes, and called blogs "garbage", I will explain myself.

First of all, I put "article" in quotes, because I'm not a journalist, but if that piece was written to the standards of professional journalism, I'm a pickled herring.

Second, I called blogs "garbage", because from the standpoint of actually getting news, that's what they are, imo. Blogs can be many things, including entertaining, thoughtful, and even enlightening (though some are little more than sophomoric crowing). But compared to properly researched and vetted, well edited articles, they are little more than gossip.

Simply my opinion. My earlier tone may have been more harsh than necessary, and if you felt it so, I apologize.

As for whether this side discussion has relevance to the topic, I would point out that clearly knowing the source of information is important in any serious discussion.

GO


raystern


Nov 26, 2012, 3:07 PM
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Re: [cracklover] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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I appreciate your thoughtful response. Allow me to help put our discussion in context and, at the same time, give a little more info about this bee attack.

The article you posted about my "anti-bee kit" idea was the 4th article I wrote on the bee attack.

I was the first news media outlet to break the story:

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2012/10/camelback_mountain_bees_on_the.php

The next day, seeing that some news media reports had screwed up and implied this happened on a hiking trail, just off Echo Canyon trail, I researched and published the following article:

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2012/10/camelback_mountain_hiker_dies.php

I made sure this second article would be useful to climbers like me. I wouldn't deem the article (a.k.a. "blog post") perfect, but the Phoenix Parks and Rec department spokesman complimented me afterwards for getting it right when other reporters hadn't.

A few hours later, also on Oct 30, police released the name of the victim, so I published another news blog article about that:

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2012/10/joshua_ruzsa_19_identified_as.php

Those three articles ran in our Valley Fever news blog, which is a great source of local news for Internet users. My main sources for these three articles were the Phoenix FD, Phoenix PD and the Phoenix Parks and Rec Department.

Because I was dwelling on this incident, a few days later I chose to publish the "anti-bee kit" article in the New Times Jackalope Ranch blog, which usually runs news about the arts world, but also runs "outdoors" articles. I published it in Jackalope because it was less "newsy" than what we normally run in Valley Fever.

I have put in a records request with the Phoenix PD to obtain the full police report on the incident. I plan to publish a Valley Fever article, (or "blog post," if you'd rather call it that), once I read that report. I will put the link in this thread after the post is published so y'all are sure to see it.

Later.

Ray


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Nov 27, 2012, 6:01 AM
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Re: [raystern] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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Good to know. Thanks, Ray.

GO


billcoe_


Dec 24, 2012, 5:24 PM
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Re: [jbone] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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jbone wrote:
I'd hope not to many folks are wasting their time in deep discussions with people who are unwilling to stand by their word.

Still, I'm willing to talk more about how the bee's on Camelback Mtn are a direct result of our overpopulation in the Phoenix area. The bee's would not be so aggressive if we did not overtake their habitat on a daily basis and intrude upon their livelihoods. Bee's are responsible for pollinating our crops and greatly improve crop yields as a result, yet we build our houses over their homes with no regard for them whatsoever. People wonder why without looking at themselves first. I can go on and on...


Baloney, and you're clearly not a biologist....


quasenada


Dec 26, 2012, 5:11 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] Camelback Rock Climbers Have Few Options in Bee Attacks [In reply to]
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This past Saturday 12/22/2012, I went to a sports crag in MG, Brazil, - http://rocktripresende.blog.terra.com.br/...a-de-passa-vinte.jpg and everything was going really well. Great amazing gigantic roof with all kind of hard sports routes.
The day was going really well. At the end of the day, my partner was working on a route when he got stung by bees almost on the end of the route. He asked me to lower him quickly and so I did.
He was not able to clear up my last 3 quick draws from the route, so he left behind. Being stubborn and somewhat no knowing what I was getting into it, I decided to wait about 30 min and I would go back there and get back the 3 quickdraws.
To make a long story short, while I was setting up on the top to be lowered, I saw myself in the middle of a mad bee hive. In the hurry of things, my daisy carabineer got stuck inside the rap anchor ring (the ring was a very small one btw), and I was not able to lowered. I had tons of bees around me on attack mode.
That was the time when I started to realize that I was really in trouble, and I had to somehow release the carabineer to be lowered. Also at that point my belayer already was being stung by lots of bees as well.
Since I knew that I was the only person that could save myself, I was able to remain calm, and focus on the task at hand, which was to release my carabineer from the rap ring. The setup was weird and the rope weight was not letting me to release it. After much struggle and praying as my focus mantra, I was able to release the weight from the system by climbing on the wall and with my right hand release everything.
I think I got around 50 stings, which was not too bad after all I think because I remained calm. My body also reacted well to the stings and after a day or two; I was OK other than a very tired and cramped body.
This was one of the scariest things I have experienced. Before, I would think that would never happen to me. But now I realize that outdoors can take turns very fast into realms we never expect.
Accidents are accumulation of little mistakes, and I think that was the case as well. The main one was to go back to recover 3 quick draws only 30 min after the first attack. From now one if attacked by bees, I would take my time to go back and If I do, I would go better prepared (Fully covered including face and eyes). Also I will be ready to leave it behind if not sure.
I wanted to share this experience 1- for myself to register the incident and learn from it and 2- so others can learn from it w/o having to experience it.
Thank you
~R


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