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Slacklining - Slackline tension
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frawg


Jun 24, 2002, 8:08 PM
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Slacklining - Slackline tension
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How much?
Say i want to span 20 feet. How much webbing will i need for my line? I tried about 20 feet the other day, but i only have 35 feet of webbing, this didnt seem to be enough because there was still plenty of slack in it. My 2 year old could step on it, but it sagged way too much when i tried.

Formulae?
Peaze
frawg


beyond_gravity


Jun 24, 2002, 8:23 PM
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Slacklining - Slackline tension [In reply to]
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Have you tryed using a single pully, and pulling threw as much line as you can, then adding another pully and repete? You could also try getting a static rope or other webbing, and clove hitching it to the biner that your slackline is connected too. Then use this in your pully system.
Other then that, I'd say buy a longer line
mine is 20m


krustyklimber


Jun 24, 2002, 8:32 PM
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Frawg,

For a span of 20 feet you'll need about 30 feet or less to get started, and once you get it tight you'll have a bunch of slack.
Go to slackline.com and learn the "primitive system" it is perfect for short lines (say under twenty-five feet). For lines longer than that I recommend a doubled line (I sewed mine together) tightened with a compund pulley systen or a come-along.

And make sure to use "tree friendlies", carpet or cardboard or sticks or whatever so you don't kill the tree, for this reason I never girth hitch a tree. Instead I take flat webbing (yes flat webbing) and make three wraps around the tree, tie it off with a water knot, and stuff as many sticks in the webbing as will fit then I girth hitch my line onto the webbing. This way the line lays flat and the tree will be fine!

A-frames are also very helpful, they give you leverage to help pull it tight.

All this is well covered by the nice guys at slackline.com .

Jeff


frawg


Jun 25, 2002, 3:42 PM
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yeah i haven't invested in pulleys or come alongs. I was using a system i got from a link in the slacklinebrothers.com. Uses 3 biners..

Peaze
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krustyklimber


Jun 25, 2002, 5:02 PM
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Frawg,
Add two more 'biners! Or even more!

The primative method is very cool, and should do the trick!

Jeff


frawg


Jun 29, 2002, 9:09 AM
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how does one add more biners? And does that increase the tightening? Like if i add 2 more does it tighten more with the same ammount of pulling????????????

Peaze
frawg


krustyklimber


Jun 29, 2002, 1:33 PM
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Frawg,

Get ready to learn some knots. You have two choices of how to add more 'biners... One tie one more into the clove hitch, and clip one more into the anchor... Or two. tie the end of your slackline into a "bowline with a Yosemite finish" or a "directional figure of eight", either of these knots can be tied with a large enough loop to put many 'biners in, without slipping, and can be loaded lenghtwise. The bowline is easiest to untie. Both of these knots will take some practice to learn to dress properly, but it's good for you!
"A well dressed knot is a strong knot" U.P.
(especially important in fishing line)

Hauling 101:
The more times you can go back and forth with your hauling system it gets easier. Think about the basic "primative system", it has four 'biners and the webbing goes back and forth four times 4 to 1 (or 4:1). This makes you be able to pull with four times your strength, if you go back and forth two more times (one 'biner at each end) you now have a 6:1 and you can pull with 6 times your actual strength (or weight). Even more 'biners means even more power, but after about three per end it gets very cluttered. So then I girth hitch two slings to my line and to the anchors and can go with up to three in each of these (bringing me up to a tree and car pulling 12:1).
Please tell me you are nodding your head because you "get it" (to borrow a phrase).

If your line is long you may want to consider a doubled line, I took 100 feet of webbing and sewed it together with a half twist (for girth hitching). That made a lot of difference. You could tape it together, but I have access to a heavy duty machine (mom's will do it), and I'll never have to worry about retaping it or tape becoming litter.

If you, or anyone else, has any questions about this, let me know I'll try to clear it up!

Jeff

P.S. maybe we do need a slacklining forum?


Partner jules


Dec 14, 2002, 6:04 PM
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Slacklining - Slackline tension [In reply to]
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[small]This topic was moved to the Slacklining forum by juliana[/small]


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