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Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic?
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raymondjeffrey


Jul 23, 2005, 1:00 PM
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Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic?
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I would have to say the climbing is aerobic, but I am interested in what y'all think and why.


d1ll1gaf


Jul 23, 2005, 2:15 PM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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I think that the answer depends upon what type of climbing you are doing, for example:

Bouldering = anaerobic

Single Pitch climbs = half/half (I know that I am always breathing hard after a hard climb)

Multi-pitch = aerobic


islandclimber


Jul 27, 2005, 10:05 AM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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why is this in the aid climbing forum?


aznrockclimber82


Jul 27, 2005, 10:34 AM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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Cause he seeks aid for his question.

Monk.


jv


Jul 27, 2005, 10:36 AM
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I suppose that speed aid climbing can be aerobic, and if you go really fast for a long time you'll go anaerobic. I've redlined while jumaring too. But usually I'm going so slow in aiders, I'm not even burning fat.

JV


fluxus


Jul 27, 2005, 3:00 PM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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There are a number of threads on this topic in the training section.


jt512


Jul 27, 2005, 3:09 PM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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In reply to:
I would have to say the climbing is aerobic, but I am interested in what y'all think and why.

If you're not climbing anaerobic, you're not trying hard enough.

-Jay


oklahoma_climber


Jul 27, 2005, 3:33 PM
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In reply to:
I would have to say the climbing is aerobic, but I am interested in what y'all think and why.

i think you are wrong. and i think that because climbing is anaerobic.


jt512


Jul 27, 2005, 3:39 PM
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In reply to:
In reply to:
I would have to say the climbing is aerobic, but I am interested in what y'all think and why.

i think you are wrong. and i think that because climbing is anaerobic.

Clearly, it depends on how hard you are climbing relative to your fitness level, or more precisely, relative to your anaerobic threshold. Did I just say anything there?

-Jay


epic_ed


Jul 27, 2005, 7:22 PM
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epic_ed moved this thread [In reply to]
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epic_ed moved this thread from Aid Climbing to Technique & Training.


epic_ed


Jul 27, 2005, 7:23 PM
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In reply to:
why is this in the aid climbing forum?

Because I've been working on over-moderating other threads. :P


jowanky


Jul 27, 2005, 7:31 PM
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Wouldnt it be aerobic when you still have ATP, and then anaerobic once you have to switch to glycolsis with the byproduct of lactic acid or lactate? So it would be both.


kcht


Jul 27, 2005, 7:35 PM
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Bouldering is definately anaerobic, sport.... also anaerobic. Trad/aid maybe a mix.


krisp


Jul 27, 2005, 7:38 PM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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In reply to:
I think that the answer depends upon what type of climbing you are doing, for example:

Bouldering = anaerobic

Single Pitch climbs = half/half (I know that I am always breathing hard after a hard climb)

Multi-pitch = aerobic

Bouldering=correct
Single pitch=wrong
Milti pitch=wrong

All climbing is anaerobic. period. to perform an aerobic activity your heart rate has to stay a certain number of beats per minute( I think is something like 20bpm) over your resting heart rate for at least 20 consecutive minutes. Because of the length of a pitch, and the rest at the belay, this is damn near impossible. Maybe if you were free soloing a 5.2 and literally running up several pitches....anyway, aerobic climbing... I don't think so :roll:


fluxus


Jul 27, 2005, 7:55 PM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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The question "is climbing aerobic" is like asking "is running aerobic." Neither is a very good question because they are far too broad. The answer in both cases is that it depends on the duration and intensity of the work being done by the muscles in question.

For most of the muscles in the body climbing remains aerobic most of the time. For the muscles of the forearms which we depend on so heavily, and which are so small climbing quickly become anaerobic.

Doing aerobic endurance training for your forearms will increase both the intensity and duration of work you can handle without depending too heavly upon anaerobic energy production.

Doing anaerobic endurance training for your forearms will increase the amount of climbing you can do when relying mostly on anaerobic energy production in the forearm muscles.

Check out this book: http://www.amazon.com/...nce&s=books&n=507846

it covers both topics in great detail and includes specific workouts.

its available in October.


fluxus


Jul 27, 2005, 8:11 PM
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In reply to:
All climbing is anaerobic. period.

And the above statement is incorrect. Period.

You can't use HR as a way of measuring what energy system is being used more heavily in climbing.


muttblood


Aug 7, 2005, 11:59 AM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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Try reading the following article entitled "Physiology of Sport Rock Climbing" For those of you who are unfamiliar, VO2 max is the maximum amount of oxygen the body can take in, utilize and distribute in the body during exercise. You may or may not be surprised with the results of the experiment.

http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/38/3/355


rufusandcompany


Aug 7, 2005, 12:57 PM
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As some have mentioned, whether on not you are climbing anaerobically or aerobically depends on a number of factors. Here is some info, in layman's terms, to help you determine your physical state, while climbing. Once you understand this, wearing a heart monitor will better assist you in gauging your condition. You will also need to be tested for your VO2max, so that you can determine what 70% to 90% of your capacity is.

Energy is derived aerobically when oxygen is utilized to metabolize substrates obtained from food, and deliver energy to the working muscles.

A sports event, or activity that will build cardiorespiratory endurance, is termed aerobic when the majority of the energy in the athlete is derived aerobically (aerobic training is without oxygen debt). Aerobic training should be activities that are performed continuously for a minimum of 15 to 20 minutes at a level of 70% to 90% of maximal heart rate; no less than three times a week.

Athletes requiring a higher level of aerobic fitness (endurance) will train four to six days a week. Examples of large muscle group activities include; walking, jogging running non-sprint cycling, swimming, and cross-country skiing.

The critical feature of aerobic activity is continuous activity. And, specificity of training (SAID) dictates that the training should closely resemble the activity, or event: Runners should run, swimmers swim, for example. Thus, to improve cardiovascular endurance, the athlete should train aerobically.

Athletes involved in activities with a low aerobic component, such as bouldering, football, power events in track, sprint events in running, swimming, and cycling, may see a decrease in power and strength with excessive aerobic training. These athletes should limit their aerobic training to the early preparation of off-season training and then engage in a minimal amount of aerobic training to maintain good general fitness.

I hope that this helps.

KC


clausti


Aug 7, 2005, 4:16 PM
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somehow i dont think the cellular respiration variety was what he was asking.

on the most general level you have sports that are "aerobic" like running. and sports that are "anaerobic" like weight lifting. the term refer more to catagories of exercise re:weight loss than anything else, as far as i can determine.

in that case, climbing is anaerobic, as far as losing fat is concerned. however, if you climb regularly you will still probably lose weight, but only as a function of burning more calories than you are used to. not as MUCH as if you spent the same running, ect.


on a sub-cellular level, all exertation begins as aerobic, and progresses to anaerobic if continued long enough, and THAT has to do with how much oxygen is in your muscles. the important part of that is that the product of anaerobic cellular respiration is the 3-carbon chain lactose/ lactic acid, a much larger molecule that the 2-carbon chain product of aerobic respiration.

edit... actually, the REALLY important part of the differnt paths of cellular respiration is that, because the 3-carbon chain is larger, you know it has more energy still in it. therefore, it is a less efficient pathway.

POINT: breathe. keep breathing.


rufusandcompany


Aug 7, 2005, 4:49 PM
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In reply to:
somehow i dont think the cellular respiration variety was what he was asking.

on the most general level you have sports that are "aerobic" like running. and sports that are "anaerobic" like weight lifting. the term refer more to catagories of exercise re:weight loss than anything else, as far as i can determine.

in that case, climbing is anaerobic, as far as losing fat is concerned. however, if you climb regularly you will still probably lose weight, but only as a function of burning more calories than you are used to. not as MUCH as if you spent the same running, ect.


on a sub-cellular level, all exertation begins as aerobic, and progresses to anaerobic if continued long enough, and THAT has to do with how much oxygen is in your muscles. the important part of that is that the product of anaerobic cellular respiration is the 3-carbon chain lactose/ lactic acid, a much larger molecule that the 2-carbon chain product of aerobic respiration.

edit... actually, the REALLY important part of the differnt paths of cellular respiration is that, because the 3-carbon chain is larger, you know it has more energy still in it. therefore, it is a less efficient pathway.

POINT: breathe. keep breathing.

If you are referreing to my response, his question was very general. I believe that the information, that I supplied, will help him. Cheers, KC


clausti


Aug 7, 2005, 5:00 PM
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Re: Climbing: Anaerobic or Aerobic? [In reply to]
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rufus: no, i was not talking spec to you. more to jay, really. as you said, his question was very general, and i dont think that a discussion on cellular respiration was what he really wanted, which is what jay was referring to with the "how hard" you are climbing comments.

i didnt even really read ur post till after i'd posted.


rufusandcompany


Aug 7, 2005, 5:04 PM
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Clausti, Thank you for clarifying that. I am trying to get used to navigating this site. KC


fluxus


Aug 7, 2005, 6:19 PM
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The thing about this discussion is that speaking in such general terms is not much help in describing what happens in climbing.

You can talk about heart rate and other issue as much as you want but the fact remains that these things do not play out in climbing as they do in other activities. It seems that the point can not be made often enough that in climbing our first concern is what energy system the muscles of the forearms are relying more heavily upon. In climbing one simply can not draw a diret line between systemic factors such as heart rate and what is going on locally in the forearms. Understanding this is essential to understanding climbing and how to train for it.


eclipsor


Aug 10, 2005, 11:04 AM
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Rock climbing (at least the great majority of it) is an anaerobic glycolytic sport.


rufusandcompany


Aug 10, 2005, 2:24 PM
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Eclipsor is correct.

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