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sharpie


Sep 1, 2005, 10:22 AM
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Alex Lowe


skinnyclimber


Sep 1, 2005, 11:13 AM
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It's interesting, because I haven't read enough climbing history to have picked out, or unconciously settled on or whatever, any "heros".

At this point the only people I look up to in a practical sense are my partners here in New Mexico. Those include Kyote321 and chucky from this sight, and of course others.

I guess a lot of young climbers like myself could use to read a lot more.

Skinny


vegastradguy


Sep 1, 2005, 11:23 AM
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My heroes vary depending on what I'm doing. Some constant ones are:


Famous folks...
Peter Croft, Tommy Caldwell, Jim Donini

Local folks...
George Urioste, Joanne Urioste, Joe Herbst, Larry DeAngelo, Phil Broscovak, Larry Hamilton, John Williamson, etc, etc...

(This post was edited by vegastradguy on Mar 29, 2007, 10:37 PM)


bubbahotep


Sep 1, 2005, 11:34 AM
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Two pages of heros and no one has mentioned the Bird.

He's right up there on my list.


onbelay_osu


Sep 1, 2005, 11:51 AM
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In reply to:
.

Do I need to say Peter Croft? Or is it implied?

no that is a given of course what about Duane Raliegh?????finger of fate anyone....anyone


areyoumydude


Sep 1, 2005, 1:22 PM
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My wife Laurel, who always took care of business when I was out playing.

Bob, you're my hero.


atg200


Sep 1, 2005, 4:43 PM
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seeing george hurley's desert slideshow at neptune's a few years back had a huge influence on me. not as well known as he should be - an easy man to admire.


cfnubbler


Sep 3, 2005, 9:47 AM
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george hurley.... an easy man to admire.


Agreed. Dont know how I forgot him. Stand at the base of Black Crack on Cathedral, then think about drytooling it in full winter conditions. Then think about doing it when you're well into your 50s. If that doesn't make you're nuts shrivel up, you're either a bad ass climbing chica or George Hurley. All those North Conway hardmen, and they're not exactly lining up for that one. And he's a swell guy to boot.

-Nubbler


dirtineye


Sep 3, 2005, 10:06 AM
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I don't have any heros, but those I have climbed with and learned from and admired as climbers and as people are, in no particular order, Adam Henry, Jeff Noffsinger, Arno, Shannon Stegg, the late Jim Okel, and Jim Corbett.

I never climbed with Jeff Lowe, but he is a most impressive individual, especially in the way he was dealing with adversity at the time I met him.


akicebum


Sep 3, 2005, 10:28 AM
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Correct me if I am wrong but isn't Hirayama (possibly spelled wrong) a badass. How about Salvaretta, Pratt, or Child. Or the Hold Chipping machine gun bolting duo of Piana and Skinner. Bubu Bole is pretty much your industry standard badass. What is really amazing is that no one has mentioned Lynn Hill, Beth Rodden, or Catherine Desiville. Steve Schneider has been throwing down in the valley sinced having a mullet wasn't retro. Paul Pritchard, Andy Kirkpatrick, Mick Fowler, Chris Bonnington, Don Whillans are a few names to remember. I was stoked that someone remembered the Uriostes. Somehow we forgot the Hubers though.
These best climber are often called a waste of time. I like them because they make me verify a climber's credentials. By credentials I mean totally badass route they have put up in a style I respect. You can't just toss a bunch of Rock and Ice cover boys up and say look at how tough these guys are. These top roped and eventually pink pointed aid lines that are going free in the valley are great achievement by great climbers, but they don't inspire me. Whereas routes like the Azeem Ridge have me living in a van and livign off rice and oatmeal. Climbing is all about adventure, exploring the unknown. At least for me. The "trad" climber that has inspired me the most is Greg Child, what a balls to walls badass.


jv


Sep 3, 2005, 11:27 AM
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How can you mention Kauk and not John Bachar? How can you include Robbins and Pratt and not Yvon Chouinard, Tom Frost, Bob Kamps, Doug Robinson, Frank Sacherer, or John Salathe?

Here's a few others I didn't see mentioned: David Brower, Norman Clyde, Jules Eichorn, Jim Erickson, Peter Haan, Warren Harding, John Long, John Muir, Anton Nelson, Charlie Porter, Bev Powell, Mark Powell, Bestor Robinson, Steve Roper, Galen Rowell, Allen Steck, Chuck Wilts.

JV

By the way, it's "heroes," not "hero's."


brutusofwyde


Sep 3, 2005, 12:12 PM
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In reply to:
Two pages of heros and no one has mentioned the Bird.

He's right up there on my list.

Although he was never one of my heroes, I used to respect the Bird until I heard him advocate still tossing cr@p bags of the Captain. Robbins, from hearing him talk, has grown out of much of the arrogance of his youth. Perhaps some of us can learn from life's lessons.

My heroes are mostly folks I have tied in with: Nurse Ratchet, Allen Steck, Dingus Milktoast, Steve Schneider. From each of them I have had my concept of the universe expanded, been given new insights, learned new perspectives, and had the walls to my perceptions blown apart.

Brutus


jelliott


Sep 3, 2005, 12:35 PM
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By virtue of having a small resume of areas that I have climbed and loving Tahquitz I think Tobin Sorenson was badass and Rick Ac along with Long and the rest of the "Stone Masters". IMHO I think they were one of the catalyst that Dingus mentioned. Plus all those like Chuch Pratt, Kamps, Croft are awesome. Also all those unnamed guys who make climbing about climbing, not grades.


peterz


Sep 3, 2005, 1:36 PM
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Gaston Rebuffat ...


all_that_is_rock


Sep 3, 2005, 6:41 PM
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a few climbers whose acomplishments I can dig are as follows: Royal Robbins, Conrad Anker, Steve House, Josh Wharton, Voytek Kurtkya, Henrey Barber, anybody with the last name Lowe, Ian Altman, Mark Twight, Jim Mcarthy, Hans Krous (spelling??), Russ Raffa, Russ Clune, Dick Williams, John Long, Dean Potter, John Bacher, Jim Bridwell, Charlie Fowler, John Shermin, Lynn Hill, Steph Davis, Bean Bowers, Tony Yaniro, Chuck Pratt, George Hurley, Yvon Choinarnd, John Stannard, Sue Kliegerman, Peter Croft, Billy Westbay, Amon McNealy, Allan Steck, and Warren Harding, to name a few....


rockprodigy


Sep 6, 2005, 7:26 PM
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...so here we are with another list.

Don't feel bad, there's nothing wrong with it. Our sport is unique. Unlike basketball, etc, we have the opportunity to test ourselves against the same opponent as those who came before us...the rock. So, it's only natural that we think of the climbers that came before.

Besides the numerous greats that have been listed (especially Hong, Croft, Hill, Gullich etc.), I've always been inspired by people who have had the vision to see the next evolution in climbing. Often, these guys were ridiculed in their own time, and sadly some of them still are today, even though their tactics are completely acceptable now. I'm talking about pioneers like Alan Watts, Tony Yaniro, Ray Jardine, Todd Skinner, and Paul Piana. All of them maxed out the trad climbing standards of the day before rethinking the man-made constraints of the sport in order to progress further.

[soapbox]Breaking out of the mold took courage. I think it's a shame that certain of these people (Skinner and Piana in particular) are still criticized today...and for what? The sins that got Skinner and Piana blacklisted in Yosemite were hangdogging, fixed ropes and tick marks...tactics that people like Tommy, Beth and Steph (no disrespect intended) get a free pass for. I think it's time that we give credit where credit is due. [/soapbox]

One of my contemporary heroes is "Platinum" Rob Miller. I've never met another climber who is so committed to his own sense of style. He holds himself to standards that few people are aware of, and most would consider ridiculous, even though it probably costs him fame and fortune. He doesn't do it to impress anyone else, it's just the way he likes to do it.


Partner yannbuse


Sep 6, 2005, 7:37 PM
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M Piola - although he did drill a bit, what he did for trad is incredible


Partner angry


Sep 6, 2005, 7:41 PM
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Alan Watts, Tony Yaniro, Ray Jardine, Todd Skinner, and Paul Piana. All of them maxed out the trad climbing standards of the day before rethinking the man-made constraints of the sport in order to progress further.

I can think of 3 separate Scarpelli stories that start as "Me and Suzuki were running laps on Hypertension and Paul Pianna comes over the hill waving his arms like a jackass..."

The stories all end with Suzuki hiking a route Pianna had just claimed an FA of, yet couldn't do 2 moves this attempt.

Other first hand stories of him flat out lying. A friend of his said that Pianna FA's are either easy or a lie.

No dis to anyone else on the list. But even if the rumors are only half true, he's a shady character.


bandidopeco


Sep 6, 2005, 8:29 PM
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Bridwell. I am very fortunate to be good friends with him (his son Layton and I were best friends until they moved from Tahoe to Palm Desert way back when.) I did my first multi-pitch with him (West Crack on DAFF) and learned to lead from the guru himself (not to mention how to smoke camel fiterless without making any litter.)

Shinohara, whom I met here in Saku, Japan. He is to Ogawayama what Bridwell or Bachar is to Yosemite, plus he's over 60 and still has guns, plus he boulder's harder than I and go climbing almost every day!

Suzuki for everything he did around Tahoe and more (so far I've only had the skill to do Flying High Again.)

then comes the Usual suspects: Bachar, Kauk, the Hubers, Potter, Caldwell, Kor, etc...

Oh, and a special mention of Herman Buhl. Every climber should read "The Lonely Challenge."

Last of all my Uncle Glen Poulsen. I don't know anyone with a truer love of the mountains.


Partner euroford


Sep 7, 2005, 6:45 AM
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i read allot, and have likely collected most of the seminal mountain literature, so from my reading i could list numerous climbers (many already listed here) that i could envy for a variaty of reasons.

but instead, i'll focus on the two whom have earned my respect not just from mountain lore, but having gotten beat down while trying to follow in there footsteps. Kor and Weisner. The shit they did, the style they did it in and the tools they had available, its just godsmacking.


deepseaclimber666


Sep 29, 2005, 12:41 PM
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I believe that anyone of the climbing pioneers in the South Platte area is a hero to me.


hosebeats


Sep 29, 2005, 1:22 PM
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My friend Tom who has the most unflinching dedication and intensity that I have ever witnessed.

Most of the Golden Age Cowboys of Yosemite. The men who did it their way, didn't take shit, and set a hell of a standard for which the rest of us attempt to measure up to. A set or two of nuts and some pitons make for brass balls. I'll take cams and damned sticky rubber, please.

Finally my dad. He's not a climber but he taught me the love of mountains and the freedom of the outdoors. Thanks, dad.


glacierboy


Sep 29, 2005, 1:43 PM
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John Roskelly. Art Davidson. Maurice Herzog. Guys who know what it means to be cold. As far as Piana and Skinner go, can't speak about Piana but I got a chance to climb with Skinner once and he seemed like a super nice guy. And man could that guy send...I was blown away. He was touring our area so he was onsighting everything, making it look easy.


golsen


Sep 29, 2005, 2:14 PM
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In reply to:
...so here we are with another list.

Don't feel bad, there's nothing wrong with it. Our sport is unique. Unlike basketball, etc, we have the opportunity to test ourselves against the same opponent as those who came before us...the rock. So, it's only natural that we think of the climbers that came before.

Besides the numerous greats that have been listed (especially Hong, Croft, Hill, Gullich etc.), I've always been inspired by people who have had the vision to see the next evolution in climbing. Often, these guys were ridiculed in their own time, and sadly some of them still are today, even though their tactics are completely acceptable now. I'm talking about pioneers like Alan Watts, Tony Yaniro, Ray Jardine, Todd Skinner, and Paul Piana. All of them maxed out the trad climbing standards of the day before rethinking the man-made constraints of the sport in order to progress further.

[soapbox]Breaking out of the mold took courage. I think it's a shame that certain of these people (Skinner and Piana in particular) are still criticized today...and for what? The sins that got Skinner and Piana blacklisted in Yosemite were hangdogging, fixed ropes and tick marks...tactics that people like Tommy, Beth and Steph (no disrespect intended) get a free pass for. I think it's time that we give credit where credit is due. [/soapbox]

One of my contemporary heroes is "Platinum" Rob Miller. I've never met another climber who is so committed to his own sense of style. He holds himself to standards that few people are aware of, and most would consider ridiculous, even though it probably costs him fame and fortune. He doesn't do it to impress anyone else, it's just the way he likes to do it.

Interesting list rockprodigy. I too respect all those you mention; however, for trad climbing? Alan Watts should be credited for bringing sport to Smith and at the time, it received tons of publicity so for a historical perspective he deserves huge credit. This was from about 83-87 and beyond. But those were critical years for the sport evolution.

I agree with everything you said except it is obvious that those who expanded boundaries at the expense of ridicule are going beyond traditional. This really leads into that darn question, What is TRAD?

Trad climbers to me are those that held to certain ground up beliefs. There were many from Boulder in the 70's. While Skinner and Piana did some great stuff, they certainly expanded by hangdogging. That was different than old school trad ideals.

I admire them all, but this thread goes back to why I do not like the word trad. There is no consensus of what it means...

Now Sport, I believe has a consensus. To me it means the route was started by drilling on rappel....And then all techniques to free said route aside from altering the rock are legal.

Just my two cents. I dont think you can say who is your trad hero until you have defined trad. And if climbing the Nose with a very fast time is trad, what is meant by that? Certainly, grabbin pro aint traditional. Anyway, good thread but the real problem is that there is not an accepted view on what trad means.....


raymondjeffrey


Sep 29, 2005, 2:57 PM
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Margery Farquar (sp) was one of the first dedicated gals who set high standards. So was Royal Robbins' wife, she made a few contributions of her own, no? I dig Layton; intense and employed. Tom Frost is definately one of the most important figures in the annals of climbing; dedicated Mormon who abastained from drugs and alcohol in a 'counter culture' that almost celebrates pot smoking all the while earning the respect of climbers and non-climbers alike.

All of the humble 'non-well-known' folks out there willing to give a helping hand to newbies.

Thanks gambler and Larry,

Jeff

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