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arp30


Aug 10, 2002, 7:24 AM
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Alpine and Mountaineering
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Want to get into Alpine and mountaineering. What are some good ways to learn ( guide services or junkies) and what would be some great first climbs? Times of year to go?

[ This Message was edited by: arp30 on 2002-08-10 07:25 ]


k9rocko


Aug 10, 2002, 7:40 AM
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Just a while ago, I was thinking the same thing. Now I am headed for the TETONS...

Not sure how I'll do (I'm a bit green in the Alpine corner) but I sure am excited.

My advice.... find someone experienced. Trad climb for a couple years with them, and then sneak in the "why don't we do a mountain?" statement.

Good luck!


marcel


Aug 10, 2002, 8:03 AM
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Alpine and mountaineering climbing is my favorite. And, the Tetons, except for all the people is a primo place to do it. Do go with someone who knows what they are doing. If you do hire a guide, (a good way to learn) the Exum guides are very good. Some of the best climbers in the world got their start working at the Exum School.

[ This Message was edited by: marcel on 2002-08-10 09:59 ]


climbchick


Aug 10, 2002, 8:19 PM
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If you're interested in formal training, check out the American Alpine Institute
http://www.aai.cc/

A friend of mine did the winter mountaineering course that the Colorado Mountain School offers and says it was an excellent experience. They're at http://www.cmschool.com/


k9rocko


Aug 16, 2002, 10:01 PM
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ARP30-

Just returned from the Tetons. It was alot of fun.

However, we grunted (cheerfully) at the guided folks who were hiking (carying little more than daypacks) to the lower saddle. IMHO, it was better to have done it on our own power (pig our own gear, find our own route).... rather than have our gear waiting for us above at the 'Exum Shack.'

Just out of curiosity I grabbed a price list from Exum guides.... Our two summit (Mt. Moran / Grand Teton), 4.5 day adventure would have cost about $1,100 (times two) for the guide service alone.

Again, my suggestion would be to hook up with someone (like my partner) who has more experience and 'experience the mountain', instead of 'buying a ticket to the top'.

Example, there was a 62 year old man (George) who climbed the mountain in 'old school' style.... and was impressive to watch. He also served as a route-finder for two total strangers he met at the lower saddle.

I am sure there are plenty of folks who are trustworthy / capable partners that would save you a few wooden nickels. I sure got lucky myself.


apollodorus


Aug 16, 2002, 10:51 PM
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Go LATE, around September or October. That's when the snow/ice has compacted and is stable. Well, at least that's the formula for success for California Alpine climbing in the Sierras above Lone Pine.

Then again, if your weather is shaky that late, then maybe it's not safe. I guess it's a toss up: stable ice and snow vs. a storm.


rollingstone


Aug 30, 2002, 2:33 PM
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Note: one thing no one is addressing is the fact that you are in Wisconsin, and therefore no local range is available for you to just "go and do it". If you decide to try some alpine mountaineering, I agree with the advice that several years of trad rock climbing is helpful before you go out in the mountains. Pick your ranges carefully, because the differences between the Canadian Rockies, Colorado Rockies, Cascades, Sierra Nevada or the Coast Range are considerable. Knowledge of local weather phenomena, route conditions, time of year and that particular season can all affect decision making. Read some guide books on the various areas, and see if there is some climb or climbs that suit your fancy and ability level, and find someone more experienced to go with. Good luck.


astone


Aug 30, 2002, 4:36 PM
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The hardest question in Alpine climbing is:

"Will retreating from this climb save my life or just make me feel like a wuss?"


topher


Sep 1, 2002, 7:50 PM
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start with hick and doing lote of hard 4th class hikes. then get good at trad, find some one who knows what there doing become freinds, climb with them, bye lots of gear and a way you go.


tradguy


Sep 5, 2002, 10:53 AM
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I took a class once 4 or 5 years ago from Colorado Mountain School and found it to be really good. I think it was 2 days of class, and then a 1 day climb. Living in Iowa at the time, I found it to be extremely helpful, because, while I had read all about the various mountaineering skills of self-arrest, crevasse rescue, avalanche evaluation, beacon searches, etc, in "Freedom of the Hills", I was just never able to practice them out there in the flatlands. I took the course in early May, which seemed like a really good time because the weather was fairly stable, but there was still alot of snow in RMNP. Our one day climb was really cool, because myself and a friend who went with me convinced the lead guide to take he and I up a more technical, difficult line than the rest of the class.


estebandb


Sep 6, 2002, 1:15 PM
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I used to be able to "go out and get it" when i lived in Ecuador (climbed a 5910m!) NOw I live inrhode island and is damn flat. if you have the money and time i think colorado would be the closest place that ive been, at least.

astone:
i agree. u have to have enough experience, or be with someone who has, as to know when u either retreat or keep up. It's a tough choice, but i'll rather wonder if i coulve made it until i try iy again, rather than killing myself for being stubborn


Peace

[ This Message was edited by: estebandb on 2002-09-06 13:16 ]


CameronCurtis


Nov 23, 2011, 10:56 AM
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Re: [arp30] Alpine and Mountaineering [In reply to]
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The OPs original question is what I'm looking to have answered, but since he wasn't very specific the answers he got don't even begin to answer it for me. So allow me to elaborate:

I have no Trad experience, but I am not looking to climb at that level yet anyway. I understand that 4th class routes would be the way to go, but I'm interested in climbing them this fall/winter. I live in Washington, so climbing is definitely near, however I guess my biggest concern would be avalanches and glaciers (unlikely), among weather factors too.

Is this an accurate statement? And if so, is what I described reasonably safe to attempt without a guide or professional instruction, (maybe after reading freedom of the hills and doing follow up research on particular locations based off of that book?) I would have a partner with no experience as well.

Simplified version:
Can I climb something that might need an axe, without getting myself killed?

And if so, what would you suggest I do, keeping in mind I cannot pay for professional instruction, or even hassle a mentor for his time, since I work such a chaotic schedule.


thatguyat99


Nov 29, 2011, 7:57 PM
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Re: [CameronCurtis] Alpine and Mountaineering [In reply to]
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There are just too many variables involved in climbing to not have some sort of instruction or direction from someone experienced. While Freedom of the Hills is a great tome of knowledge for many aspects of climbing it is not an instructional how to book.
When I wanted to gain mountaineering experience I took a NOLS course there in Washington. For 17 days we were on a glacier learning self arrest, how to build anchors in snow and ice, crevasse rescue, route finding, objective hazard evaluation, etc... Expensive? Yes. Time consuming? Yes. Worth it? Yes.
Hire a guide, take a course, find an experienced partner willing to teach...Your health and your life are worth it.


(This post was edited by thatguyat99 on Nov 29, 2011, 7:59 PM)


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