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Rock Warriors principals beyond climbing
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amstone


Feb 18, 2006, 6:45 PM
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Rock Warriors principals beyond climbing
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Took a clinic in Columbia, MD with Arno and the light bulb WENT OFF! Love it when that happens! My biggest problem was rushing through a climb to be done....results oriented with no appreciation of the learning process. When I came on to something tough, I would freeze up and panic because I could not 'finish'. I have been able to work through some of this and started leading outside (huge deal). As I have sat and considered what I have learned from Arno, I realized that this pattern is something I have done in other areas of my life. Rushing through work projects to get them out of the way or even wishing the kids were older to be 'done' with the not so fun parts of parenting.
I just found it interesting that my major obstacle I face climbing is a major obstacle in other parts of my life as well.
Thanks Arno! on many levels......


yakiman


Feb 18, 2006, 9:20 PM
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I agree. The ideas/lessons/insights/practices found in The Rock Warrior's Way continue to help me live life on life's terms. When I am faced with situations in the workplace, family, etc. I am getting better at taking, stock of the situation (however unfomfortable/fearful it may be at the time), looking at my options, then choosing a course of action, accepting the outcome, and taking responsibility for the consequences. Concious breathing and "soft eyes" are practical exercises that work in and outside of climbing.

I need to read Rock Warrior's Way again.


_fiend_


Feb 19, 2006, 10:43 AM
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Well blimey this is a coincidence! I was on the verge of starting almost the same topic too - about applying RWW principles to life in general.

(Somewhat of a cyclical concept of course given RWW is applying life principles to rock, but I'm sure I'm not the only one who has been exposed to warrior principles through RWW first!).

I've had some issues going on recently that have forced me to reassess my life, how I feel about it, where it might be going - long overdue really. Part of this is being prepared for change, being able to go outside my comfort zone, and confronting what is scary and different rather than shutting myself away from it.

Obviously there's a large parallel between dealing with adversity in life and dealing with adversity on a climb - both involve mental challenges that take you outside your comfort zone. And warrior principles are there to be applied to both.

So I've started looking at the RWW concepts with different eyes now, looking at them as they apply to life (something that someone suggested a while ago and I should have listened to them then). I've also bought Eckhart Tolle's "The Power Of Now" (expands the being in the moment concept, albeit with a highly spiritual side - still the basic principle feels right to me), and ordered Dan Millman "Way Of The Peaceful Warrior".

I haven't really been thinking about RWW for climbing in the last few weeks, and I think when I read it again I will read it more holistically.

I would be nice to hear about people's stories and anecdotes about how they've found warrior principles in life in general...


amstone


Feb 20, 2006, 8:51 AM
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Yep! It is funny how we can get some great advice from people who care greatly about us but we cannot apply it until we are 'there'. I have learned to listen more and shut my pie hole for that very reason.

I, too, have found myself assessing my life and where I am and that is where I finally correlated the RWW and my general approach to life. The concepts are concepts that I have heard before and applied on different levels but for me, RWW brought it all together in a single picture. The pieces all fell into place.

I am not saying I practice it faithfully. I forget and have to remind myself regularly. It seems to be that I have to start from the beginning with the assessment process everytime I am faced with a new situation. It does not come automatically. I know everyone's experience is different and we all learn on different levels. I just feel so 'programmed' sometimes and have to stop myself from just reacting and actually place one foot in front of the other to move forward in a situation.

The self talk is a huge one. I allow my self talk to rule me sometimes. Realizing that it is not truth about me but self talk only and that it is to be analyzed piece by piece is incredibly freeing.

I agree that it is nice to hear other people's reflections on this.


lou_dale


Feb 22, 2006, 9:57 AM
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i'm amazed at how many see the relationship between climbing
and living and how arno's warrior's way principles fit so well
in our lives.

i think in general climbing is a metaphor for most of us related to
our lives and that by having arno's vehicle (WW), we are able to
apply those principles to living better lives as well as having greater
joy in our lives (and our climbing).

i know from my own personal experiences that it opened up the "can of worms" initially but i must also admit that i had kept the lid closed on purpose. once opened, however, i began to see that i was cheating myself out of the joy that life really is - much the same way as climbing brings me such joy (can you say orgasmic?).

as silly as that may sound - and hopefully not offensive - my life began to take new shape when i started climbing. the door was then opened to all new possibilities - most importantly - trust. learning to trust others with my life, trust others around me, trust friendships/relationships, and eventually myself. ahhh, the key therein lies, does it not? why do we grip so tight? only to clip that bolt or slot that nut then suddenly, it's ok?! trusting yourself is huge.

i learned (and continue to learn) from arno and the WW - the book is tattered and torn and pages are dog-eared and much is underlined and highlighted and it is one of my most precious items. i find that all of the items on his card given to us in the courses - work in my every day life.

observe - be aware of what is really going on not just around you but inside of you; center - keep in balance - life is about being in balance with all things - look at nature at its perfect balance; accept - consequences may not always be exactly what you expect but you can almost bet, it is what you need at that very moment so you can learn and grow; focus - my favorite one - my most favorite of favorites - when i am focused on exactly what i need to be doing at that moment - life slows down, there is no past or future - i am in this moment and it is exquisite; commit - ok, if you are going to go - then for heaven's sakes - GO - make sure you are ready to accept the consequences of your actions - does this not apply to all things in our lives? sure! trust - trust your partner and if you don't, get another one - trust yourself - my toughest one - believing in me - but once you have that, you do not become bloated with ego - you actually become more relaxed; pay attention - to not only what is going on in front of you, pay attention to your belayer - he is or she is your life line; pay attention to the things that could occur should you make a mistake - be aware of those things around you that could cause harm - to you or others - and pay very close attention to your gut instincts - connect that to your heart and you can't go wrong.

this works in life too - all his principles should be etched in stone - and until they are - i have them permanently etched on my soul.

lou


arnoilgner


Feb 22, 2006, 11:47 AM
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Hey _fiend_, are you at a mid-life crisis?

Last night I was working with a climber at the local gym. This was our second session; the last one was in Oct. Her Mom recently died and during the last month of her life she confided in her daughter that she didn't feel like she knew herself. She had the usual life of doing what she was told and living the life she saw everyone else living. But something was missing. She didn't know why she had lived. Now let's get back to the climber (daughter). She said, "I don't want to end up like that. I want to know who I am."

She gave me some feedback on applying what we'd gone over in our first session back in Oct. She applied lessons to running and climbing. She found that she associates failure with not finishing the run/race or falling. And, she was able to stop those thoughts and redirect attention on the process--breathing, feeling her body exerting effort. She commented that she felt much more at ease once she'd let go of the associations she had about failure.

Last night she observed that she tends to rush herself. And this is key. She noticed this. When we just do things habitually we cannot change. We need awareness and to begin this process you need to develop this observer/noticer/witness. So she caught herself rushing and I asked her, "Why are you rushing?" She realized she just wanted to get to the top. I reminded her to let go of that desire; it wasn't helping her achieve the top. Then I helped her focus in the moment by simply breathing, relaxing, and making just one move, then the next, then the next. Taking it just one move at a time helped her focus on just that part of the climb. She did get to the top but it was a result of a bunch of "parts" done one at at time.

So, does she know herself more now? Yes. She observed a tendency she had (to rush) and learned some tools to slow down (breathe, relax, one move at at time). Knowing yourself takes a deliberate decision to do so. Then it takes commitment to practice 24/7. What will you do today to learn more about who you are?
arno


_fiend_


Feb 23, 2006, 1:30 AM
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Lou_dale, that is a great post and the main paragraph is a great summary of the principles to follow.


Arno,
In reply to:
Hey _fiend_, are you at a mid-life crisis?
I guess so. To be brief, my partner has left me, and that caused me to have some revelations about where my life had been going (nowhere) and how I had shut myself away from it's possibilities. I've realised a lot of things and a lot of connections I hadn't seen before. I'm trying to improve my way of being and dealing with situations....so I can stay open to whatever life has to offer.

In reply to:
What will you do today to learn more about who you are?
That's a good question! And one perhaps to ask oneself on waking each day. Today I'm flying out to Spain on a little climbing trip. I think I will observe how I do with the travelling, organisation, dealing with my partners (who are not as focused as me), and also how I react to any adversity (cock-ups, weather, delays etc). It's a start...


_fiend_


Mar 6, 2006, 1:33 AM
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In reply to:
In reply to:
What will you do today to learn more about who you are?
That's a good question! And one perhaps to ask oneself on waking each day. Today I'm flying out to Spain on a little climbing trip. I think I will observe how I do with the travelling, organisation, dealing with my partners (who are not as focused as me), and also how I react to any adversity (cock-ups, weather, delays etc). It's a start...

Well I had a good trip - 4 days climbing and 2 days visiting my brother in Barcelona - and did learn a few things...

I learnt that I place a lot more value on hanging out with my brother (and other good company) compared to just climbing all the time. I really enjoyed the climbing but I enjoyed other aspects too without wishing I was climbing all the time.

I learnt that when I'm feeling out of sorts and unsure about something, looking at the possible options to change the situation can be useful without actually having to change the situation, just to see that I could.

I learnt that I need to be more aware of the effect my actions can have on others, and try to look a bit past people's immediate reactions.

I learnt that when faced with conflict, I should be wary of focusing on factual disagreements and instead be aware of what people might be feeling.

I learnt that resolving issues transforms a situation and that compromise can involve only a little change (mostly in attitude).

I learnt that I can push myself further than I thought whilst climbing, and keep going when I think I'm already off.

I learnt that I can recover some strength even on the shittiest rests.

I learnt that I feel a bit better about falling, but still not fully comfortable about doing it.

I learnt that Kung Po Duck Tongues really are bloody disgusting :shock:


arnoilgner


Mar 8, 2006, 7:16 AM
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Hi _fiend_

Now you're cooking with gas. And, you are burning many of those preconceived conceptions and perceptions that you've been operating under. Great awarenesses.

When dealing with other people, I've found it helpful to understand that their actions have nothing to do with me; it has to do with their ability to act nice or mean. This perspective helps me maintain peace so I don't react to them but rather find a way to respond. Mental fitness is about maintaining your attention and therefore your power. I maintain my power by not giving it away through reactions that only create more disharmony.

"...trying to improve my way of being..." I would suggest you rephrase this to: I intend to improve my way of being. Intention is powerful. It is attention focused in the direction of a choice. You choose to improve your way of being. With this choice and attention on it you intend your future. Intend; don't try.

"...how I react to adversity..." It is helpful to notice when you react but then you must decide how you want to respond. "Reaction" is acting on automatic, to limiting beliefs. "Responding" is acting in a direction that will help you learn.

arno


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