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estwing


Aug 18, 2002, 6:52 AM
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bringing water
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Hi, I was wondering how you folks bring water(if any) up an all day multi-pitch adventure.

I don't plan on hauling, so what are you suggestions.

Thanks,
Sam


theamish


Aug 18, 2002, 7:17 AM
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If you're not going to haul anything I would recommend a hydration system, such as a CamelBack or its equivelent.


alpinerocket


Aug 18, 2002, 7:51 AM
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I agree, you need water for endurance climbing. I recomend hydrating before the climb by drinking a litter or two of water during the drive to the crag. Next either bring a camelback or similar hydration system with you. It will not intefere with your climbing. Or you can bring a Nalgene bottle with you. These can be cliped these right to your harness with a biener. Hope this helps. John


estwing


Aug 18, 2002, 8:22 AM
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Thanks for your replies, a further question; should one get just the bladder and minimalist bag, or a larger pack with a bladder pouch?

Sam


duck


Aug 18, 2002, 8:34 AM
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Just curious, how do you keep things from growing in a camelpack? I've never had one, so I don't know.


beyond_gravity


Aug 18, 2002, 8:44 AM
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Quote:
Just curious, how do you keep things from growing in a camelpack? I've never had one, so I don't know.


After each day, you empty it, rinse it out with water and leave it open to dry out. Oh ya, never put anything but water in the bladder!


drewcoleman


Aug 18, 2002, 9:29 AM
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Depends on the weather. You could well hydrate and probaly be ok. But if its hot might want to take some water to be on the safe side.

Drew


gunked


Aug 18, 2002, 3:02 PM
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Estwing,
As far as the size of the camelbak, it depends on what you're doing.

If I'm aiding on a bigwall, I'll climb with at least a 70 oz maybe a 100 oz.

If I'm doing a couple of trad pitches, I'll probably leave the water at the base.

If I'm doing more than two pitches, I'll carry a 40 oz or a 70 oz depending on the heat, exertion, amount of time to climb the route.

Plain and simple : STAY HYDRATED AND YOU'LL CLIMB BETTER AND BE MUCH HAPPIER! Be careful not to piss on your belayer and think about future parties when leaving your liquid waste. IT REALLY STINKS IN THE SUN!!!

Keep Climbin'


traide


Aug 18, 2002, 3:18 PM
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you can put other things besides water in your camelbak, you just can't leave them in there for very long, and HAVE to clean it out VERY thoroughly.

try going to camelbak's website. www.camelbak.com for vertical climbing, i use the camelback classis. it's very low profile, stays put, holds a lot, and doesn't interfere with my climbing in any way.


Partner sauron


Aug 18, 2002, 3:22 PM
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After spending a day out in the hot Texas sun, I've come to one conclusion...

YOU CAN NEVER TAKE WITH YOU TOO MUCH WATER.

At least (repeat: AT LEAST) a gallon per person per day. If you can afford it (energy, sherpas, etc), go for more.

- d, who will happily carry more water than suffer through dehydration.

[ This Message was edited by: sauron on 2002-08-18 15:30 ]


climbjs


Aug 18, 2002, 3:51 PM
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Sauron is right. You can never, ever underestimate how much water to bring. You will, inevitably end up drinking much more than you brought. Water is one of the weights that you have to bring that is worth it's weight in gold. Water is your bodies universal solvent and should be treated as such.


Partner philbox
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Aug 18, 2002, 4:20 PM
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   I`d highly recommend getting a packet of that dehydrated water at the local cheap shop. When you get to where you`re going just add water and hey presto you`ve got as much water as you want, brilliant, works every time. Comes complete with a free set of steak knives.
...Phil...


kmae


Aug 18, 2002, 4:52 PM
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Another very good reason to stay hydrated is that your muscles lose a lot of their power when you start to become dehydrated. I have used a Camelback for years, and I agree with the other folks who say it does not interfere with climbing (except for some chimneys, which I try to stay out of anyway). I carry 100 oz. and never notice the weight.


evs786


Aug 18, 2002, 5:07 PM
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The Best thing you can do for yourself, especially on a mutli-pitch route is keep hydrated. And, by the way, loss of apetite occurs at 2% dehydration, so If you dont drink, you dont eat as much, which in turn makes you much weaker and drains your energy. My advice would be to definatly take a camelback/platypus.


the_elk


Aug 18, 2002, 6:25 PM
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As per every other reply here I'd take a camelback, or something similar.

The way we used to work it with the guys I started climbing with was that the 2nd carried the back pack with the bottles of water in it. Which caused a couple of problems. If you were leading you didn't have the annoying back pack but you had no water until your 2nd got to the next belay ledge. If you were the 2nd, you could drink more water but you had to deal with the stupid back pack putting you off.

After one adventure, where I decided I'd lead the entire climb, (my 2nd was cool with that) and my 2nd FORGOT the back pack so we had no food, no water and no guide book, I took it upon myself to buy a small backpack that had a water pouch and seperate pockets to put a few energy bars in it so I'd never have to rely on anyone for MY water. And it sticks close to your back so it really doesn't mess with your balance.

Cheers, Elk


fitz


Aug 18, 2002, 10:17 PM
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For a full day at Tahquitz, I guzzle from a gallon jug on the drive, then stick 2 32oz Nalgene bottles in my pack. One stays there, at the base of the climb(s), the other gets clipped on my harness (right through the hoop that holds the lid to the retaining ring).

I used to use thinner bottles reinforced with duct tape, but the weight of the Nalgene bottles just isn't that big a deal, and my pump screws directly on them, which is handy.

Hydration systems seem pretty spiffy, but I do like the ability to easily shift where I carry the water, or even dump the load on the second when the leading gets hairy.

-jjf


stevematthys


Aug 19, 2002, 5:12 PM
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i use my cammelback


Partner tim


Aug 19, 2002, 6:14 PM
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camelback for long days (sometimes with gatorade/water or fruitjuice/water 50/50, rinse with lots of water afterwards), nalgene for short climbs, climbs where I can put the pack on a second, or ice.

it really, really sucks to get fully dehydrated. I'll never let it happen to me again. chewing your tonsils f'ing blows.


madturtle


Aug 19, 2002, 7:59 PM
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I wouldn't get the minimalist cammelback. I climb w/ a cammelback blowfish, a little more $ but it has paid for itself many times over. If you get one of the low profile packs you can carry some food and extra supplies without affecting your climbing too much. I've done all day climbs and carried everything I need for me and my partner in one. It's great for skiing, hiking any other all day activity w/o a heavy load to carry. Anyway thats my 2 cents for what it's worth, hope I don't sound like a salesman or anyhting.


apollodorus


Aug 19, 2002, 8:49 PM
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I'm with philbox. I like both Evian Crystals and freeze-dried Perrier. All you do is add plain water.


farmerc


Aug 19, 2002, 8:49 PM
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nalgene bottle with a 12 inch sling duct-taped to it. i clip it to a biner that i put around the waist belt of my harness in the back. the biner is clipped down and out so that the spine is between your back and the waist belt. clip the bottle and descent shoes to it and you will be happy when you get to a belay. unless you are leading aid, chances are you will be at the belay station before you know it. bottoms up
~Chris


wildtrail


Aug 19, 2002, 9:20 PM
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I never go anywhere without water. Years in the mountains keep you beverage humble. Usually just a bunch of Nalgene bottles clipped to something or in a pack. Also, I have a Camelbak.

Steve


punk


Aug 20, 2002, 6:52 AM
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Staying hydrated is extremely important Just look at Apollodorus and philbox for the devastating affect of dehydration




[ This Message was edited by: punk on 2002-08-20 11:59 ]


radistrad


Aug 20, 2002, 7:04 AM
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Small back pack that the second carries. You put your water, food and any extras in it.


hangerlessbolt


Aug 20, 2002, 11:39 AM
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On multi-pitch routes both partners carry small hydration packs with snacks (clif bars)

I may freeze the packs or drop in ice cubes the night before so that I have cold water as I climb.


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