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Work your weaknesses but play to your strengths?
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_fiend_


Jul 12, 2006, 3:18 PM
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Work your weaknesses but play to your strengths?
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Is this in harmony with the RWW philosophy? Thoughts?


arnoilgner


Jul 15, 2006, 8:45 PM
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Re: Work your weaknesses but play to your strengths? [In reply to]
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absolutely. By climbing to your strengths you honor your own style. By improving your weaknesses you enhance your ability to climb to your strengths. One thing to consider is there is a weakness in every strength.

Example: I tend to be more intuitive. This is my strength. I can commit and trust my body to figure out the climbing pretty well. However, I tend to rush into sections before enough analytical assessment beforehand (my intuitive strength just became a weakness). So, I work on being more analytical before I launch into climbing (like when I'm stopped, resting, and assessing the next section). Then when it is time to climb I climb to my strength: intuitively.
arno


_fiend_


Oct 12, 2006, 8:16 AM
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Re: Work your weaknesses but play to your strengths? [In reply to]
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By climbing to your strengths you honor your own style.

I like that, "honoring your own style" ;).

It makes sense - your style is your style because it's what you do well - and you still get all the learning, journey, challenge etc when doing something in that style, you just have to push the comfort zone a little further (usually as simply as trying something harder!).

I didn't really think of my strengths being my style, it just seemed like the easiest type of climbing, but recently I've met people who have different strengths and thus different styles, so I can appreciate it more.

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One thing to consider is there is a weakness in every strength.

Interesting, I'm not sure I agree with that. For example, my strength is crimpy, flakey wall climbing - long moves between reliable edges where I can use my finger strength and confidence on good holds. But I don't see a weakness with that, I don't see anything downside. Sure, there is the "weakness" that when I encounter something else I struggle more, but that's not a weakness to this strength, that's a weakness to having any strengths at all.

But I suppose that's an interesting idea in itself and it goes back to my topic - by having strengths we can flounder in comparison when faced with our weaknesses. I guess I was wondering if RWW prescribed a more "character building" view, i.e. one should strive to tackle one's weaknesses as much as possible because it's a perfect opportunity to get outside the comfort zone and learn new stuff!

But that's probably looking into it in too much depth. It boils down that we can choose a suitable challenge whatever style we're doing.


karma


Oct 12, 2006, 9:27 AM
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Re: Work your weaknesses but play to your strengths? [In reply to]
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I guess it could be said that your dependence on crimpy, flakey holds is in turn your weakness. Perhaps you've gotten so confident on them at a detriment to other types/styles of climbing? Just an off thought.


mturner


Oct 12, 2006, 9:28 AM
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Re: Work your weaknesses but play to your strengths? [In reply to]
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In reply to:
One thing to consider is there is a weakness in every strength.

Interesting, I'm not sure I agree with that. For example, my strength is crimpy, flakey wall climbing - long moves between reliable edges where I can use my finger strength and confidence on good holds. But I don't see a weakness with that, I don't see anything downside. Sure, there is the "weakness" that when I encounter something else I struggle more, but that's not a weakness to this strength, that's a weakness to having any strengths at all.

I think arno is saying that every strength has it's limits. I understand that you're saying if you have trouble with other types of routes that is a weakness not of that strength but of a separate weakness. However, that kind of depends on how you look at it. Say you're on route that has many short moves with bad holds and you try to skip what you can by throwing to more positive edges, you might not being doing the route the most efficient way to conserve your energy and maximize your long range potential. So your not weakness of slopey edges isn't really the problem, it's your strength that might be hindering you.

To give you a classic example. Take a tall climber like me, obviously my reach is one of my strengths but if I relied only on my reach I'm not likely to develop much technique or flexibility. Plus, being tall isn't always beneficial. There are plenty of times when I feel "scrunched" with high feet and short moves.

I guess it's all in how you look at it though because I do see your point about those things not being weaknesses of that strength but, separate weaknesses all together. Maybe arno can clarify


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