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Stability of adjustable homewalls...
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markinthailand


Sep 2, 2002, 4:34 PM
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Registered: Jun 23, 2002
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Stability of adjustable homewalls...
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My wall (8x8) is fixed angle right now, and I'm thinking of making it adjustable angle with chains. It will be fixed at the bottom with bolts into brackets.

How stable do people find ajustable walls? How much (if any) side to side movement, etc.?

Thanks!

-markinthailand


bluesky


Sep 2, 2002, 5:31 PM
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Registered: Aug 13, 2002
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Stability of adjustable homewalls... [In reply to]
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Mark,

Weird, I just wrote a note another forum about an adjustable wall I used to have, it too was 8x8. I had it mounted via long threaded bolts at the top sides to 4x4s. These were then stabilized on the floor with 2x4's - once again bolted to the 4x4 and to the bottom of the 8x8 wall. Took a little finaggling to adjust angle, and sometimes new holes. It was very stable as long as it was at an angle of 75 or steeper. Man I wish I still had it Jesse


sligoblues


Sep 10, 2002, 3:27 PM
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Unless you have sufficient overhang, you're going to notice some amount of movement. But on an 8X8, you tend to be making more static moves and the instability is less of an issue. It's definitely a sufficient setup for adding variety to your training, but if you can add any temp. supports when you have it in position, it's worth the effort.


paintinhaler


Sep 10, 2002, 4:21 PM
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Stability of adjustable homewalls... [In reply to]
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Well I have one and it works great. I used two 2x6's and made a corner for the wall. Like a "L" and cut a 6 in peice of pipe in half. I put the wall in the pipe so it can pivot really good when I adjust it. Well mine is fine with two or three people on it even. I would sell it because It cost me so much, and I cant use it for the car we have in there all the time. Anyway I hope I answered your ?'s.


twrock


Sep 11, 2002, 11:05 PM
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This is a little hard to explain in words, but I'll try.

My home "woodie" is actually a steel frame with plywood surface. The steel frame is simply because it was cheaper to build it with steel where I live. I originally designed it to be both freestanding and adjustable by raising and lowering the top. But I was disappointed that as I lowered the angle (made it steeper), it got too tight at the bottom and I lost climbing surface (hence many people recommend a kick plate along the bottom).

I discoverd that it was just as easy to make the top of the wall stay relatively in the same location but make the bottom of the wall be the place where I raise and lower the angle. This way I never lose any height at the top of the wall no matter what angle it is at.

I don't have a kick plate, but that would be easy to integrate if I designed it correctly in the first place and would actually add to the stability.


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