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Slackline webbing recommendations
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andreasth


Sep 5, 2006, 1:29 AM
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Slackline webbing recommendations
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I want to order webbing in the US to ship to Germany.

I already have 1 inch tubular webbing from Slackline Brothers Inc. This is very nice but I want to try out and test some other material. I made a list of products I came across (See below). Here are my questions:

- What webbing do you recommend? What is it good for (long lines, surfing, jumping, highlines, etc.)?

- Scott Balcom suggests in his book that 9/16 inch tubular webbing is a "fast and dynamic line". Sounds interesting - I'll get this! What do you think?

- I read about Sterling type 18 webbing in http://www.rockclimbing.com/post/1416654 but could not find type 18 webbing on the sterling site. What is type 18 webbing? Where can I buy it?

- I asked http://www.ahsrescue.com about webbing. They said Sterling TechTape and Bluewater Climb-Spec is the same webbing!! True? - Strange, because they list different tensile strength's (See below).

- Is 11/16 inch tubular webbing called "Supertape" or 9/16 inch? I bought webbing in Germany that is called "Supertape" ( http://www.edelrid-box.de/...and19mmsupertape.php ). It is 19 millimeters wide. I thought
1 inch = 25.4 millimeter
11/16 inch = 17.5 millimeter
5/8 inch = 15.8 millimeter
9/16 inch = 14.3 millimeter
.. so what is "Supertape"?

- Do you know a good online shop for webbing?


Sterling
1 inch Nylon Mil-spec Webbing 4000 lbs
1 inch Nylon TechTape Webbing 4400 lbs ( "TechTape" means Climb-Spec )
11/16 inch Nylon Webbing 3000 lbs
3/4 inch Nylon Webbing N/A

http://www.sterlingrope.com/...s_group.asp?pg_id=30


Bluewater
1 inch Climb-Spec webbing 4200 lbf
9/16 inch Climb-Spec webbing 2200 lbf

http://www.bluewaterropes.com/...0Gear&CategoryKey=11



Slackline Brothers Inc.
1 inch Tubular Webbing 4200 lbf
5/8 inch Tubular Webbing 3200 lbf

http://www.slackline.com/Detail.bok?no=1


PMI
1 inch Tubular Webbing
1 inch Flat Webbing

http://pmirope.secure-shops5.com/..._category.asp?cat=44


CMC
1 inch Tubular Webbing 4000 lbf
1 inch Flat Webbing 6000 lbf

http://www.cmcrescue.com/...ry.php?dept_id=20395


Note that Sterling has 11/16 inch but not 9/16. Bluewater has 9/16 inch but not 11/16.
Bluewaters 9/16 inch is Climb-Spec - Sterlings 11/16 inch is not!


Partner tisar


Sep 5, 2006, 1:41 AM
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Registered: Jul 1, 2004
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Re: Slackline webbing recommendations [In reply to]
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Hi Andreas!

Sorry I won't be able to help you out. Just wanted to say 'hi', welcome you to rc.com and say that I hope to see you in the park soon again :lol:

- Daniel


Partner slacklinejoe


Sep 5, 2006, 12:47 PM
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Re: Slackline webbing recommendations [In reply to]
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The funny thing about comparing webbing is that almost none of the companies that market webbing actually produce webbing. Most simply buy from textile mills, usually in the US and order specific weave types to then resell under their own branding.

There are suprisingly few factories that actually produce webbing, basically it's just a handful. However, each company tends to closely guard who their supplier is and may have proprietary weave types or blends of spectra/dynemma w/ nylon. Due to varying testing procedures and safety margins the actual published strengths may vary on the exact same webbing.

Generally speaking, most everyone uses 1" nylon tubular mil-spec for slacking. It's cheap and gets the job done unless your looking for a specific characteristic such as extra abrasion resistance in which case you'd look at climb-spec webbing which has a smoother finish.

Some of the tech tape and super tape names get confusing or confused with each other, even by retailers. Some are blended with spectra or dynemma for extra strength - the tale tale sign there is that it will almost always have white thread patters in it since spectra/dynemma are usually not dyed.

Other places offer flat webbing vs tubular webbing - this goes all over the spectrum from being too light duty for slacking to even stronger than climb-spec. Type 18 is a flat weave that as you pointed out is stronger and more abrasion resistant, it's also 4X the price of mil-spec. It is almost exclusively used in rescue situations due to the price and general overkill in strength for slacking. It does however show promise for highlines which is why I'm putting together a giant order for the stuff sometime soon (around 5,000 yard).

A few people line thinner web as the elongation is increased, these lines are almost always used by people who like surfing the line. These fall in special purpose domains in my opinion, as the increased elongation can make them less suitable for other tricks such as jumping. There are also a few others who walk on spectra/dyneema webbing that is almost always thinner than 1" - it's expensive and offers very low elongation.


andreasth


Sep 5, 2006, 3:31 PM
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Re: Slackline webbing recommendations [In reply to]
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Thanks for the insights, Joe!

In reply to:
Type 18 is a flat weave that as you pointed out is stronger and more abrasion resistant, it's also 4X the price of mil-spec.

So is this http://www.cmcrescue.com/...rootNode=0&pid=20397 Type 18 webbing?
But it's about the same prize than tubular webbing .. ?!


Partner slacklinejoe


Sep 5, 2006, 3:39 PM
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In reply to:
Thanks for the insights, Joe!

In reply to:
Type 18 is a flat weave that as you pointed out is stronger and more abrasion resistant, it's also 4X the price of mil-spec.

So is this http://www.cmcrescue.com/...rootNode=0&pid=20397 Type 18 webbing?
But it's about the same prize than tubular webbing .. ?!

I think only BlueWater calls it type 18 (again, proprietary weave names) but it's likely the same stuff. That is a dang good price on the stuff (I've seen it selling in a gear store for $1.15 / foot), but then again that's a rescue gear shop so they likely go through a lot more of it than normal shops. The best I could do is match that price when/if I get the stuff on hand.


greenketch


Sep 5, 2006, 9:04 PM
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Re: Slackline webbing recommendations [In reply to]
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I have a section of the type 18. It was my post that brought it up to start with. As far as I am concerned the jury is still out. It is much less dynamic and does not walk as well when it is less tight. When it is tight it is fun but the edge is stiff due to the non tubular weave. It feels much like walking a 1" board with square corners. I am experimenting further to see if it softens a little with more use.

I did find a place in Idaho that sells it by the foot at $.51/ft. I will collect the number and/or address. If you ar still interested post up and I will forward it to you in a day or so.


slackinjacklyn


Sep 5, 2006, 10:28 PM
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Re: Slackline webbing recommendations [In reply to]
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Interesting observation on the type 18 webbing. I'm one of the guys who love that stuff, but I slack in my gym shoes so I have not noticed the torsional stiffness issue some have mentioned. It seems to be pretty lively when strung really tight. I guess its all just personal preference, though the idea of increased safety margins on highlines sounds pretty good. I now have a "permenant" backyard highline using this as the top line (of 3 stacked lines). I'd post photos but that seems more complicated than programming my VCR. I just got a roll of type 18 from Sterling (through a dealer special order). 300', 52 cents per foot.
-Terry


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