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making a bouldering pad
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Partner pianomahnn


Oct 3, 2001, 7:39 PM
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making a bouldering pad
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I'd say, since you've seen pads, make one that you saw in a store that you liked the best. I'm sure it won't be near as quality, but maybe I'm wrong. Just make it so that it's easy to haul to the crag. And that is really the only thing to keep in mind. Everything else should build on that.


Partner rrrADAM


Oct 3, 2001, 8:30 PM
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I tried at first brutha, and I have acces to the best materials. The sewing is the problem, unless you know a sail maker, or industrial seamstess. The commercial crash pads do one great thing mine would not do, go on my back comfortably, as well as be a backpack. The one I made went in the trash without me ever using it once, to unwieldy to carry any distance.

So unless you plan on climbing close to your car, break down and buy one. I hated parting with the $$$, but I love mine.


rrrADAM


kriso9tails


Oct 3, 2001, 9:24 PM
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Although if you're lacking in skill (or luck) and you don't have a crash pad then you'll end up on crutches.

Isn't that good quality foam really expensive? Is this for a personal project, or just to save a few bucks, because if you're just trying to save then you're probably getting better value for a store bought crash matt.


fiend


Oct 3, 2001, 10:07 PM
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materials:

  • High quality open and closed cell foam: $50-80 (you could use cheap foam but then the pad would be basically useless and a waste of time and effort)
  • Tough, durable (and stylish ) material to cover the foam. $20-50
  • Velcro/zipper closures for foam insertion points $5-15 (if you go with zippers you need heavy duty ones and a fairly large length.)
  • webbing and padding for straps (you gotta be able to carry the damn thing) $5-15
  • some sort of buckle closure system to keep the thing folded for carrying. $5-15


Plus (as mentioned already) industrial sewing machine, heavy duty thread, and some knowledge of sewing. If you aren't good with sewing then you can learn pretty easilly but expect to waste materials while learning.

Alternate option: Grab any kind of foam you can find and wrap it up into a duct tape nightmare.

You're probably looking at minimum $75 plus work time for a low quality pad that will probably look horrendous and not last as long as one of the nice cushy cordless pads with the fuzzy, comfortable material, nice closure system and high grade foam.




c_plante


Oct 5, 2001, 11:54 AM
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You could always go to a foam wearhouse type of place, where they'll make you anything you want, and cover it however you want. It may be cheaper than going to say MEC, but I can't guaruntee how much cheaper. It saves hassel anyways. Of course, you could always skip those video games you've been ploppin' quarters into a buy a crashpad


rck_climber


Oct 5, 2001, 1:25 PM
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For what it's worth, having had so many children by now (and another one on Wednesday ), I have used the old crib mattress as a pad before. It's huge, doesn't fold and is generally a pain to carry around, but works. Especially if you just attach some shoulder straps right to the back of it, it's not so bad - a mile is about as far as I'd want to carry it, but hey, those springs inside work great.

Mick


metoliusmunchkin


Oct 6, 2001, 6:28 PM
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First, I would just use an old matress or fouton, but you couldn't lug that stupid thing through the bush to the crag! So, what I suggest is you get some high density foam, and a matrice cover (a plastic, zippered matress cover). Ofcourse this would be the cheape$t way, though, it might not always be the best. And ofcourse, the matress cover, if not on your first fall, on the first fall, would probably rip. Or, you just might have to bight the bullit and buy the 100 and some dollar Metolius crash pad.


dean585


Oct 6, 2001, 6:43 PM
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I tried saving money making a crash pad myself, and it was a big mistake, the thing was impossible to lug around cost me a lot of money anyway in materials, and much more in time, and the thing was destoyed in 1 month of consistent use, although half the time the seams got wrecked from dragging it around cuz I couldnt get the backpack straps on it. The moral of the story for me was dotn waste the time, get a job and in the time it would take you to make it you will have the money and buy a good one.


ratstar


Oct 8, 2001, 8:24 AM
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I totally agree with dean. I have done the same thing I made mine out of foam and duct tape. It was kinda cool cause I could cover any holes with a new strip of duct tape. But it got too heavy and expensive.


munckee


Oct 8, 2001, 1:15 PM
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-beerandblood...why is bouldering with a crash pad a crutch? Would you say that riding a bike with a helmet is a crutch? What about climbing with a rope? I don't think that there is any replacement for skill, but much of that skill can be gained by pushing your limits and trying things that you may fail at for the first few tries (or the first many tries). I don't think that trying to be as safe as possible should be considered a crutch. Would you gain climbing skill quickly if you were only climbing routes that you knew were within your realm of abilities because you didn't have or want to use a rope? I think that your advice on gaining skill is very sound, but your logic seems a little off to me. Just my opinion though.


ratstar


Oct 9, 2001, 10:42 AM
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I also agree with munckee. Its not a crutch and I am proud to own my crash pad.


metoliusmunchkin


Oct 13, 2001, 9:52 AM
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I do not own a crash pad because I think that it is a crutch, I simply do not own one because I am too cheap to buy one, which is what this whole topic is about, how to save some money and make your own. (Even if that isn't the case, that was the original topic).

Me personally, I do not believe that a crash pad is a crutch, nor do I believe that not having one, will make you a better climber. I think that BeerAndBlood does have a good point though, we as boulderers need to rely on our skill a little more, though, on the contrary, not to the point of which we are no longer using a crash pad. Because of the fact that I do not own a crash pad, I do most of my bouldering indoors.

I think though, at this point, not to let this topic become out of control, and a bunch of people all dissing BeerAndBlood for stating his god given right to an opinion. We should just keep this thing going on track, and try to help people with building, or not to build, or whatever, with a crash pad.

Peace.


laplaya


Oct 13, 2001, 10:28 AM
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I really fail to see the benefit of a crash pad, unless you have pads to cover the entire boldering area. the pads that I have seen for sale are smaller then a square meter. if you were to move around the rock at all, you would need someone to move the pad for you...that person could just as easily spot you, since it would be just as time binding as moving the pad. that is my opinion, and if someone wants to explain the benifiit of a pad, I am all ears.


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