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dirtbagger


Jan 18, 2008, 9:50 PM
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how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR?
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Hi guys

just curious what people here use to carry their large DSLR's up mountains, eg how are the camera teethered to the harness?

I have seen some packholsters from LowePro but not really useful, while wearing a shoulder rack!

Also worried about smashing the lense, while rockclimbing!

What are the common attachment mehtods you guys found useful?

cheers

dirtbagger


maldaly


Jan 18, 2008, 10:21 PM
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Re: [dirtbagger] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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This isn't what you're going to want to hear but I don't think there are too many people who climb with a large DSLR. Get yourself a Canon G7 or G9 for the size and weight and leave the DSLR at home or basecamp.


8flood8


Jan 18, 2008, 10:32 PM
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Re: [dirtbagger] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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i think the cool ass pictures you are thinking of getting are taken from the vantage point of another rope, while two OTHER guys are climbing...

you know like 4 hours of prep work getting into position with all you gear (in an unmangled manner)

then waiting up there in your harness while they set up and the climber gets in range for the shot you want.


cjmore


Jan 19, 2008, 2:46 AM
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Re: [dirtbagger] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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I climb with a full size Nikon D-SLR sometime with a 300 mm telephoto lens, I looked all over for something I felt safe carrying a $5000.00 camera with and did not find anything that would handle the job. I am a design engineer so I started thinking about a solution to the problem....

The system I designed will hold the camera out of harms way in the storage mode while climbing during most falls and also when inverted you will not lose the camera. When you want to shoot it can be retrieved with just one hand with complete safety. One system is built for a climber in mind and is designed to withstand a level 2 fall (depending if the camera's strap mounts will hold up) I can't go into all the features but suffice it to say it does a lot more than hold your camera. The other systems can be used alone or with a backpack.

The down side.... I am working on getting all my patents and setting up manufacturing so it is not available right now... I am very sorry about that... It is good to see this post because it validates the need for such a product.


littlebilly


Jan 19, 2008, 7:07 AM
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Re: [cjmore] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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I certainly avoid climbing with my DSLR on my rack. I usually hike around to the top of the cliff and rap down, or climb easy routes to get in position. When climbing I take a backpack with a couple shirts in it to protect my gear from any unforeseen swings.
I do have a Canon G9 that I climb with, but just for snapshots. It's a pretty bad sensor compared to an SLR (iso 80 is has more noise than iso 400 on a 5D.) I'm quite disappointed with it, but I wouldn't take a camera at all if it weren't for the G9. Maybe the G7 is better.


pico23


Jan 19, 2008, 1:47 PM
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Re: [dirtbagger] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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dirtbagger wrote:
Hi guys

just curious what people here use to carry their large DSLR's up mountains, eg how are the camera teethered to the harness?

I have seen some packholsters from LowePro but not really useful, while wearing a shoulder rack!

Also worried about smashing the lense, while rockclimbing!

What are the common attachment mehtods you guys found useful?

cheers

dirtbagger

I admit only having carried my SLR (not DSLR) on a few technical climbs (5th class, or technical ice) but as was done by many on route mountaineering photographers in the past (Sir Christopher Bonnington as an example, Galen Rowell, etc)...I'd recommend buying a SMALL SLR/DSLR and a prime lens.

I have carried a SLR/DSLR on ice climbs (low grade NEI 1-2+ or 3-), and on general mountaineering trips.

This isn't sexy (small camera, small lens), and you won't "look" like a bigshot, but you will get better images since you'll actually use the camera at times, and have an easier time hauling the gear.

Many good mountaineering shots were taken by climbers on the actual climb, but most cragging shots are taken by climbers climbing or rapping a parallel route with fixed lines where they can haul whatever they want.

I just can't picture taking a D1/D2/D3 series camera on a hard or even semi hard rock climb with an attached 2.8 zoom. Not saying people don't do it, I'm just saying the average person not getting paid to will lose interest in this approach pretty quickly.

If you get Jeff Acheys book, which IMO, isn't a great book but not a bad one either. he does expound on the principal of not buying the best/most expensive gear for climbing photography. It's inevitable that your lenses, filters, and bodies will take some abuse. I'd follow his advice and buy used glass, that you can tolerate loosing. It's precisely why I spent so many years hauling my easily replaceable Program Plus, KX, and K1000 SLR's into the mountains with a 24 or 28mm 2.8 prime and a 80-200 f/4 prime. The whole high quality setup can/could be replaced for $250 but I never had to replace it (although the 24mm finally did die after too much abuse, it seems a element has become decentered and thus infinity focus is gone).

Or go compact...the G series by Canon should do you well. I had loved my G3 before I killed it, the G5 is still a nice camera for $150 used. The G9 is a nice camera which puts RAW back on the G series (G7 was non RAW JPEG only), all Gs from G3 to G6 had RAW capture.

Or (and yes I have a brand preference) I'd recommend in no particular order with a wide angle prime, a Nikon D40/D40X/D50, a Canon Rebel XTi, Olympus (all models were small below E1/E3), or Pentax D/DS/DS2/K100D/K200D with a 21mm DA Limited pancake prime.

Or any # of high quality film bodies like the Minolta X-570/X-700, Olympus OM series, Pentax KX/MX/LX/Program Series, or Nikon FM/F3/FE/FA series, again with an attached wide angle 24/28mm 2.8 prime, or wider but generally that comes at a cost of size and speed.

As far as ISO quality. I guess this is a instance where being born and raised in the film age is a blessing. I could never shoot a scenic above ISO200 on slide film, maybe 400 if I was ambitious, but with digital I can shoot at or above 400 regularly. So for me ISO400 is an amazing advancement. If you started out in digital you think if you can't shoot 1600 at 100ISO slide quality you are being ripped off. I understand that, it's a glass half full/half empy approach based on how you started.

The older G series, IMO, is superior for noise, as are most of the last generation of 4MP sensors. I look at my HO850 shots at ISO 200 and 400 and my G3 shots or Kodak 7440, compared to my wifes Panasonic 6MP LX01 or my dads Pentax W20 (7MP) all of which are newer but all have actually more noise than the legacy 4MP cameras I used and still use


(This post was edited by pico23 on Jan 19, 2008, 3:08 PM)


guangzhou


Jan 19, 2008, 4:31 PM
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Re: [pico23] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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Nice post and good advice Pico.

I have to agree on buying used lens, it's what I do and I have no regret about it. I normally can buy a very fast used lens from BnH at a reasonable cost.

For years a carried my K1000 around on every route I climb, but I never found a great way to carry it. At one point, I had a large chalk bag that could hold it and a small lens. It worked well for carrying, but wasn't the easy access I would have liked.

About ten years ago, I came to the realization that my best images were shot while focusing on photogrpahy, not the climbing. So now, I do what I can to seperate the two. On shooting days I shoot, on climbing days I climb.

When I do go climbing I briong my camera along, but I carry it in my pack. If I need it, I have it.

Two years ago I spent a few days photogrpahing the free blast for a photography I had. For that, I lead the route. At the belays, Every 3 or 4) I would fix a rope, rap down and jumar back up while photogprahing. To carry the camera and various lense I used the Metolius day size haulbag with padding.

Lowepro also make a nice Butt-bag that I used for awhile, but it's often in the way when climbing hard routes. To get it out of the way, I often slung it like a gear sling buttt....

For my next trip up El-cap i will probably carry a Nikon D40X. Good size sensor, small, light, and all I need. The sensor quality is good enough to up-size the file to the size I need for various stock sites or to keep the same size for micro stock.

Anyways, not much help,
but maybe something useful
It's Sunday morning, time to go climbing. I botled three routes and clean a crack last week, now I have to go climb them. Four new route, so trad, and a nice sunny day, what could be better.


dirtbagger


Jan 19, 2008, 5:57 PM
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Re: [cjmore] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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cjmore wrote:
so I started thinking about a solution to the problem....

The system I designed will hold the camera out of harms way in the storage mode while climbing during most falls and also when inverted you will not lose the camera. When you want to shoot it can be retrieved with just one hand with complete safety. One system is built for a climber in mind and is designed to withstand a level 2 fall (depending if the camera's strap mounts will hold up) I can't go into all the features but suffice it to say it does a lot more than hold your camera. The other systems can be used alone or with a backpack.

The down side.... I am working on getting all my patents and setting up manufacturing so it is not available right now... I am very sorry about that... It is good to see this post because it validates the need for such a product.


Ok so when can I get a test model to test???



Many thanks to all the great advice from all the others!
I just have fallen in love with my brand spanking new D300! But she is heavy (compared to my P&S SD850i) and bulky!

Due to the fact that I am generally more of a aid climber than sports climber, thats kinda ok! Just drop it in a haulbag and pad it well!

Andy Kirkpatrick carried a D80 the last time he went up El Cap and didn't seem to have much problem! And he's shots are so much better than what I got with my SD850i!

So now I just need to work out, if there is a great or good system to tie in the camera probably on a keeper string with a screwgate?, and how to work out how to carry it, while cleaning/leading, perhaps on a tagged minihaulbag or something!

Need to read some of the above mentioned texts


cheers

dirtbagger


summerprophet


Jan 19, 2008, 9:22 PM
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Re: [dirtbagger] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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dirtbagger,
I climber with a EOS 7e for years, and this is the system I had going on.

Hopefully your camera and lens can be crammed into a LowePro Topload Zoom Mini Bag (TL mini or TLZ mini). If it can, I take two of the smallest biners you can get your hands on (neutrino or smaller) and attach them to the two shoulderstrap clips on the bag. Attach the front biner to the backside of your frontmost gear loop, and the rearmost biner to your haul loop (rear center of your harness). Viola, the camera sits right on your asscheek and is almost not noticable. In addition the bar opens outward, so the camera can be dropped back in fairly easilly. The zipper on this bag is kind of exposed, so you will have to replace it after a couple years of abuse, especially if you end up climbing any chimneys or tight corners.

NOTE: If your camera does not fit in a TLZ mini bag, I would toss this out the window, A TLZ 1 or TLZ 2 would be too bulky IMHO.


pico23


Jan 20, 2008, 1:55 AM
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summerprophet wrote:
dirtbagger,
I climber with a EOS 7e for years, and this is the system I had going on.

Hopefully your camera and lens can be crammed into a LowePro Topload Zoom Mini Bag (TL mini or TLZ mini). If it can, I take two of the smallest biners you can get your hands on (neutrino or smaller) and attach them to the two shoulderstrap clips on the bag. Attach the front biner to the backside of your frontmost gear loop, and the rearmost biner to your haul loop (rear center of your harness). Viola, the camera sits right on your asscheek and is almost not noticable. In addition the bar opens outward, so the camera can be dropped back in fairly easilly. The zipper on this bag is kind of exposed, so you will have to replace it after a couple years of abuse, especially if you end up climbing any chimneys or tight corners.

NOTE: If your camera does not fit in a TLZ mini bag, I would toss this out the window, A TLZ 1 or TLZ 2 would be too bulky IMHO.

I agree...I use a TLZ Mini as well on any technical climb I've actually taken my SLR. Although I carried it on the shoulder like a gear sling.

All the above cameras I listed conveniently fit in a TLZ mini with an attached f/2.0-2.8 prime or fixed f/4 zoom.


deepplaymedia


Jan 20, 2008, 10:35 PM
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I've never ever found it essential to climb with a camera. The rare times that I am required to climb into position (instead of rapping from the top, or jugging previously fixed lines by 'monkeys') I just climb, clip in hard to an anchor & then haul the glass.


piton


Jan 21, 2008, 6:34 AM
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double bag it. SLR goes into small lowe bag with whatever i think i need for the photos (GND filters and tripod are left behind). Then SLR in lowe camera bag with padding then is placed into small backpack (black diamond) with padding usually extra clothes. I've only lead up to 5.7 this way. otherwise I will jug or rapp in for the photos. SLR is always connected to my harness with a long sling


piton


Jan 21, 2008, 6:39 AM
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Re: [piton] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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if you want to get ready for climbing w/ a heavy dslr just do weighted pullups.


atlnq9


Feb 9, 2008, 6:18 PM
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DSLR's are heavy and a pain to haul, get a mamiya 7 or wait for the new fuji 6x7 rangefinder, I once hauled my eos 3 24-70 2.8 and 70-200 2.8 along with all of my other gear 50 miles but by each night I was too worn out to stay up for evening/sunset pictures...


pico23


Feb 10, 2008, 1:21 PM
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atlnq9 wrote:
DSLR's are heavy and a pain to haul, get a mamiya 7 or wait for the new fuji 6x7 rangefinder, I once hauled my eos 3 24-70 2.8 and 70-200 2.8 along with all of my other gear 50 miles but by each night I was too worn out to stay up for evening/sunset pictures...

The problem wasn't the camera it was the 2.8 zooms.

Damn, I don't like carrying them to walk 300ft to the arena.

The difference between a 2.8 zoom and a 2.8 prime is quite a bit.

Or in the case of the 70-200 a 200mm f/4.

I just upgraded to all pancake lenses, all three fit in my pocket (at once) and optically they are superior to the 2.8 zooms. Of course the lenses I upgraded from were also superior, and faster than 2.8 zooms (f/1.4 and 2.0), these are just smaller and better built and still reasonably fast (3.2, 1.9, 2.4) and all aluminum with aluminum milled focusing rings.


atlnq9


Feb 10, 2008, 1:47 PM
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Re: [pico23] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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If you don't need the big fast lenses like I slowly stopped using the mamiya 7 is a better option, high quality lightweight lenses, lighter body, and more resolution than dslr's. I don't shoot fast action anymore, and I have grown to like the old school rangefinder.


pico23


Feb 10, 2008, 2:16 PM
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atlnq9 wrote:
If you don't need the big fast lenses like I slowly stopped using the mamiya 7 is a better option, high quality lightweight lenses, lighter body, and more resolution than dslr's. I don't shoot fast action anymore, and I have grown to like the old school rangefinder.

Ah but how slow is my 21mm 3.2 compared to your 2.8?

It's 1/3 stop. Pushing film 1/3 stop isn't going to ruin it, and digital it means ISO500 and not 400, or 250 over 200.

Or just underexpose by 1/3 stop and open it up in RAW.

The other 2 lenses are faster than 2.8 but the 3 weight half of an equivalent 28-105 zoom. I could even toss in a 28mm 2.8 to fill the gap from 21 to 43mm and still have less weight.

It gets tougher with the long stuff, but that is where APS-C sensors kick the crap out of full frame.

My 50-135 2.8 is the equiv of a 80-200 but weights half as much. Optically it's as good as any FF 80-200, and in my opinion the increased DOF of a 1.5x sensor is a benefit in an action enviroment. At 2.8 you have more DOF which means more in focus keepers.

I do agree with the range finder deal though. I'd love a Leica M series. Or even some of those Fuji medium format range finders. Maybe a Canon GL rangefinder.

If money only grew on trees!!


atlnq9


Feb 10, 2008, 3:29 PM
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I realize now that my canon system was the wrong one for my shooting style, still I have to say that digital does not apeal to me, kind of funny though. I am a 20 year old engineering student with a thousand in computer equipment yet I would never touch photoshop. So far you can't match the resolution of my 6x7 with a digital of equivalent weight or price. I sold off my canon equip after that trip, made money even after buying the rangefinder and two lenses, granted my largest lens is 80 f4 (40 in 35mm), but I don't find it a hinderance. Can't wait for the new fuji folding 6x7!


pico23


Feb 10, 2008, 4:03 PM
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atlnq9 wrote:
I realize now that my canon system was the wrong one for my shooting style, still I have to say that digital does not apeal to me, kind of funny though. I am a 20 year old engineering student with a thousand in computer equipment yet I would never touch photoshop. So far you can't match the resolution of my 6x7 with a digital of equivalent weight or price. I sold off my canon equip after that trip, made money even after buying the rangefinder and two lenses, granted my largest lens is 80 f4 (40 in 35mm), but I don't find it a hinderance. Can't wait for the new fuji folding 6x7!

I was in your shoes a few years ago. I despised digital. Then I despised APS-C or 4/3s. Really I was ingnorant, I didn't realize the advantages of the smaller system, only the few disadvantages. The biggest at the time WIDE ANGLE. Of course I now have a 10-20mm lens that is effectively 5mm wider than my widest film lens, and optically, it's amazing from 10-15mm. It's actually optimized for the wide end, so it gets a bit worse by 20mm in distortion, which is generally the opposite of where lenses are optimized.

It just happened that scanning film was the end of film for me. If I could find a monkey willing to scan for food and shelter, I'd still shoot lots of film.

I recently got an HP G4050 flatbed with 9600dpi optical resolution and true 6 color optical scanning. Scans 30 negatives in a shot or 16 35mm slides.

Only problem, HP Software sucks, so I'm out another $105 for Silverfast assuming they ever put out the software to make use of the IR (ICE) dust and scratch removal. If not it means the same old "clone stamp" routine scanning out dust. Sure I hose em with compressed air, and the really bad once I even wash, but unless you work in a clean room, count on dust being on film shots (and digital).

I figure if I can scan 30 negatives/16 slides while at work (start the batch as I head out the door). I'd catch up of film scanning in a few months, and have my entire film collection archived at 4000dpi (ie 60mb tiffs). The advantage of the large batch is no guessing what frames are what, just put a roll in the holders and go for it, delete the crap after I get home.

My other option is my Minolta ScanDual III. Great optics, good scanner 6 frames at 4000dpi take an hour with 2x or 4x multisample (8x does nothing to improve the image noise), and it's a slow tedious process doing even a roll (6 hours for a roll of 36 assuming there are 36 quality frames, which is of course not usually the case).

So digital was the path of least resistance, and really, a good digital image can print to 12x18 without any issues, just got back 20x30 that I'm thrilled with (and I'm picky about the final prints). And I have several 11x14s on the way that should be equally good. With film I'd print 11x14 max, with an occasional 12x18. I believe I only printed 5 20x30s from film, I've already printed 5 20x30s in just 4 years of digital.


(This post was edited by pico23 on Feb 10, 2008, 4:05 PM)


atlnq9


Feb 10, 2008, 5:40 PM
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yeah, I just purchased an Epson V750-M Pro, a 6400 dpi flatbed scanner which allows for wet scanning b&w's which ICE doesn't work for it should come with all the software I need, Can't wait for it to show up at my door, I am just worried about having enough harddrive space for all of my photos, basically I just want to archive the photos so I don't have to worry about fading or losing them. I think each 6x7 will be over 100mb! The largest print I have made was a 24x30, and I still can't see the grain you see in 35mm 14x16's.


pico23


Feb 10, 2008, 5:59 PM
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Re: [atlnq9] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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atlnq9 wrote:
yeah, I just purchased an Epson V750-M Pro, a 6400 dpi flatbed scanner which allows for wet scanning b&w's which ICE doesn't work for it should come with all the software I need, Can't wait for it to show up at my door, I am just worried about having enough harddrive space for all of my photos, basically I just want to archive the photos so I don't have to worry about fading or losing them. I think each 6x7 will be over 100mb! The largest print I have made was a 24x30, and I still can't see the grain you see in 35mm 14x16's.

I was looking at the 750...the wet mount was interesting, but 3x the price of the G4050 even after the $105 on the third party software. At that price, I'd go with a Nikon Coolscan

I really liked the 6 color option of the G4050, to date the only scanner with this. Not sure it does anything for negatives, but slides really do have better color repro and tonality. Of course prints should as well, although I rarely scan prints. Bear in mind this is optical 6 color, not some quacky interpolation to get the extra bits.

My lingering question is will the top notch hardware ever be fully functional, via HP it won't (everything works, just it crashes, or is simply annoying) so it's up to Silverfast. What I'm wondering is why HP made it store the scans to cache, and not directly to hard drive.

Ahhh!!!


atlnq9


Feb 10, 2008, 7:48 PM
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Re: [pico23] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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nikon won't do 120 film unless you buy there most expensive one which is more than a thousand dollars extra.
About the HP, well most of what they make is crap, see if the have updated software what came in the box may not be perfected yet, my roomate just bought an hp computer and so many stupid engineering problems (they blow the heat from the processor further into the case, wtf, we had to cut a hole in the side to atach a case fan, then there was the integrated graphics card which didn't suport two analog outputs at the same time but would support analog and digital- all they put was vga and s-video...)
silverfast doesn't suport ICE?


pico23


Feb 10, 2008, 9:25 PM
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Re: [atlnq9] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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atlnq9 wrote:
nikon won't do 120 film unless you buy there most expensive one which is more than a thousand dollars extra.
About the HP, well most of what they make is crap, see if the have updated software what came in the box may not be perfected yet, my roomate just bought an hp computer and so many stupid engineering problems (they blow the heat from the processor further into the case, wtf, we had to cut a hole in the side to atach a case fan, then there was the integrated graphics card which didn't suport two analog outputs at the same time but would support analog and digital- all they put was vga and s-video...)
silverfast doesn't suport ICE?

HP hardware is top notch. My work uses laser printers both color and B&W by them and not one has died, a few are 5 years old and print 500pages a day. We've had 2 HP laptops and my sisters HP is the only laptop that lasted her more than 12 mos. That said, we reformated our HP laptops within 3 months to clear the buggy HP software and start fresh.

If you put the 750 next to the G4050, plus all the included adapters you'd be like, hmm, why was mine $400 more.

I believe software is HP's achilles heal. Perhaps they should outsource that.

Silverfast told me they have a IR removal in the process but are not sure if it's a full release or an upgrade. If it's a full I pay $105+105...if it's an upgrade it's free. So that's my hesitation. They actually were toying with releasing it in the first version, which was the suprise they hinted at in pre release forum chat. But it hasn't happened. The problem is as they say the G4050 is such an advanced beast they haven't produced software for anything like it before.

ICE is a Kodak trademark, not sure if that is why they can't duplicate it, but the IR removal (essentially the same thing) actually allows for dust and scratch removal with Kodachrome (ice doesn't or didnt). I don't know about true B&W because I almost never shot a non C-41 process B&W (Ilford C-41 was my favorite). I do have many rolls of Kodachrome 64 though.

IMO, based on the reviews, the Epson was 3x the price, but perhaps only slightly better. Of course I realize some reviews are by idiots who can't use the hardware/software and blame it's design, but if you look at the HP G4050 reviews from both sites and consumers the hardware is rated highly, the software not. That said, even without the ice, the Silverfast puts the HP G4050 at $275 total cost for me, and with a second full version of Silverfast $380. How much did you pay for the Epson? And how much extra is the wet mount? Total about $1000 with the wet mount, right? Way too much for me!!


atlnq9


Feb 10, 2008, 10:15 PM
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Re: [pico23] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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Actually the Epson was on sale for only 600 and it includes the wet mount and I convinced them to through in half a liter of mounting oil free, which will work well for me since I have quite a few b&w's, plus it includes photoshop elements which I might end up using some but again I am not too into editing my photos which is why I don't care that it is not cs3, I am not really sure if you need the 6400dpi, I went with it more because of the wet mount, half my negatives laying around are b&w, do you know why the dust and scratch removal doesn't work with b&w? I go pick it up at the local shop on tue so I will let you know how it works.

Just saying from my experience the HP computer my roommate bought was a poor design, it overheat straight out of the box, no modifications, when we added a graphics card that would actually let him use dual displays we defiantly had to cut a hole in the case for a fan.


pico23


Feb 16, 2008, 2:35 AM
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Re: [atlnq9] how to climb with a large & heavy DSLR? [In reply to]
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atlnq9 wrote:
Actually the Epson was on sale for only 600 and it includes the wet mount and I convinced them to through in half a liter of mounting oil free, which will work well for me since I have quite a few b&w's, plus it includes photoshop elements which I might end up using some but again I am not too into editing my photos which is why I don't care that it is not cs3, I am not really sure if you need the 6400dpi, I went with it more because of the wet mount, half my negatives laying around are b&w, do you know why the dust and scratch removal doesn't work with b&w? I go pick it up at the local shop on tue so I will let you know how it works.

Just saying from my experience the HP computer my roommate bought was a poor design, it overheat straight out of the box, no modifications, when we added a graphics card that would actually let him use dual displays we defiantly had to cut a hole in the case for a fan.

I admit, I took a gamble. Usually this stuff works out for me.

If not, I'm out $179 for a great flatbed with included OCR (nice feature especially when paired with my work scanner that scans 30 pages a minute). my thinking, it replaces my outdated flatbed that I'd had since the early 2000s if the software doesn't come out. If it does, I got a good deal.

the OCR is great for turning things into searchable PDFs, like receipts and other tax crap. Or even school notes and such. Cleared boxes of bills and statements onto a few DVD's.

Yeah, the extra DPI do seem pointless, but they are optical dpi so thats a good. I think with the Minolta Scan Dual III i was scanning at 4000dpi which was sufficient for my needs. 6400 would let me print to 12x18 or so at 300dpi which could be useful.

If it does work as i'm banking on for film, I'll post an update and gloat on the $300 savings, but if not I admit you got the better deal.

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