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What film for snow/ice
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Vorago


Jan 28, 2009, 1:49 PM
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What film for snow/ice
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Hi all,

I'm going snowshoe walking next week in the Vosges ( a mountain range in north-east France) and besides taking a compact digital Nikon with me, I'm also taking an analog camera with me (either a Pentax K 1000 or a Nikkon FE). Just read about the snow looking grey thread, I'll try the overexposing trick.

I was wondering what kind of film I best take with me (I'm a complete noob when it comes to analog photography, which makes it all the more interesting imo). I've read very good things on the Fujifilm Velvia (which is 50 or 100 asa iirc) so I was probably gonna take a role of that film with me.

What else do you fine people recommend?

Greets,


edit; if anyone's interested: here a link to my flickr page with my pictures on it.


(This post was edited by Vorago on Jan 28, 2009, 1:51 PM)


uni_jim


Jan 28, 2009, 2:09 PM
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Re: [Vorago] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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no link.


Vorago


Jan 28, 2009, 2:12 PM
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Crap, sorry, here it is:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28019467@N08/


(This post was edited by Vorago on Jan 28, 2009, 2:59 PM)


atlnq9


Jan 28, 2009, 2:22 PM
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Re: [Vorago] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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I prefer provia over velvia, but others are oposite, don't have any comparison shots for ya but the velvia is warmer, but then I will use a warming filter sometimes anyways...

I use 100, it is just as good these days as the 50, just depends if you need the slower speed...

Have you ever used slide film before in either of those cameras?


Vorago


Jan 28, 2009, 2:33 PM
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No, only print film in de K1000.

Advice on which print film to take with me is welcome as well!


atlnq9


Jan 28, 2009, 2:56 PM
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I haven't used print film for years, I used I think kodak portra? Slide film is much more sensitive than print so you will want to make sure your light meter is correct or make adjustments in camera so you don't have to push and pull it...


pico23


Feb 7, 2009, 11:48 AM
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Re: [Vorago] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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Vorago wrote:
Hi all,

I'm going snowshoe walking next week in the Vosges ( a mountain range in north-east France) and besides taking a compact digital Nikon with me, I'm also taking an analog camera with me (either a Pentax K 1000 or a Nikkon FE). Just read about the snow looking grey thread, I'll try the overexposing trick.

I was wondering what kind of film I best take with me (I'm a complete noob when it comes to analog photography, which makes it all the more interesting imo). I've read very good things on the Fujifilm Velvia (which is 50 or 100 asa iirc) so I was probably gonna take a role of that film with me.

What else do you fine people recommend?

Greets,


edit; if anyone's interested: here a link to my flickr page with my pictures on it.

I'd shoot Provia 100F, it's the highest res slide film avail, it scans incredibly well, it's colors are fairly neutral (but on the brighter side).

As far as overexposing, you aren't.

THe meter defaults that whatever you point it at is 18% grey...aka, midtone.

So if you meter off snow, the camera/meter thinks that is the subject and that it is 18% grey. This isn't a film issue, or a digital issue, it's the guy pressing the button behind the camera issue.

So if you meter, do a few things 1) meter off a known mid tone and forget exposure compensation 2) meter off the snow IN THE SAME LIGHT AS YOUR SUBJECT and open up 1 stop (actually 1.3-1.5 is ideal but the K1000 is a solid light trapping box with a great viewfiner but with no EV comp).

Going 2 full stops usually results in the highlights of the snow getting clipped. So erring on the side of caution with a full stop camera like the K1000 will allow you keep the highlights, and Provia has decent shadow detail for a slide film so you should be able to pull it out with multpass scanning.


JoshCaple


Feb 16, 2009, 3:36 AM
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Re: [pico23] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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Pico's pretty spot on!


USnavy


Feb 18, 2009, 8:58 PM
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Re: [JoshCaple] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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A camera that uses film is not analog. The term analog most commonly refers to a type of waveform or circuit. Specifically, analog waveforms are generally sinusoidal in nature and pass data by varying frequency and/ or amplitude. The term digital refers to a waveform or circuit that generally represents a square wave and passes data by varying its amplitude from one set point to another (no voltage and max voltage).

The term analog and digital are most commonly used incorrectly (i.e. "analog" and "digital" wrist watches). Just because a piece of electronic equipment has a LCD screen on it does not mean its digital and just because it does not look all fancy does not mean itís analog.


(This post was edited by USnavy on Feb 18, 2009, 9:00 PM)


markcarlson


Feb 18, 2009, 10:03 PM
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Re: [USnavy] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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The phrases "analog photography" and "analog watch" are retronyms. Not all retronyms are widely accepted, but this one seems to be. See the Analog Photography Users Group (http://www.apug.org/forums/home.php) for example.

In this case, it is still accurate, since everything physical is analog anyway. In this case, analog electromagnetic radiation (visible light or X-rays, for example,) is being exposed to film, and a latent image is stored. Until it is treated as if it were digital, any time it is used, it is still analog. Smile


dan2see


Feb 18, 2009, 10:37 PM
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Re: [markcarlson] What film for snow/ice [In reply to]
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Actually the film contains silver which develops into grains. Each grain is either there, or not there.

So analog film is digital, too!

Plus, the roll of film in the camera is indexed so it's either in one position or another.

So analog camera is digial, too!


(This post was edited by dan2see on Feb 18, 2009, 10:39 PM)


acorneau


Feb 19, 2009, 10:28 AM
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USnavy wrote:
The term analog and digital are most commonly used incorrectly

In my line of work (mastering engineer) we use analog and digital recorders/equalizers/compressors/etc. all the time, and I'm pretty sure everyone in our industry has it right!
ShockedCoolTongue


USnavy


Feb 19, 2009, 1:00 PM
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acorneau wrote:
USnavy wrote:
The term analog and digital are most commonly used incorrectly

In my line of work (mastering engineer) we use analog and digital recorders/equalizers/compressors/etc. all the time, and I'm pretty sure everyone in our industry has it right!
ShockedCoolTongue

I am not talking about that. I am referring to the common usage of "thatís digital solely because it has an LCD screen on it" type of usage.


ryanb


Feb 19, 2009, 1:32 PM
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A lot of landscape photographers (galen rowel i think?) went with velvia because of its intense colored. Like the earlier posters, I preferred provia for its subtler palet. I would usually buy its cheaper consumer cousin, sensia. If i recall correctly it is the same film chemistry but the provia is calibrated to be kept refrigerated and give exact colors where as the sensia is calibrated to spend some time at room temperature on a store shelf before use.

Currently If i were to shoot film it would be tri-x for its unimitable black and white look...it requires special prosescing though. You could get a similar effect with KODAK PROFESSIONAL BW400CN black and white film. This will give you much more latitude with exposure and the ability to get your film printed at any color print lab.

pico's post on 18% grey is a good one. Most people's palms are .5-1 stop lighter then 18% grey. You can generally get very accurate exposures by holding your hand at the same angle and in the same light as (the highlights of) your subject, metering off it and then opening up .5 to 1 stops.

Sensia:
Chorillas, Peru
Cordillera Huayuash, Peru


Tri-X:

Juan, Corrientes, Argentina

Cordillera Huayuash, Peru


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