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Thermoregulation and pregnancy
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clee03m


Aug 7, 2009, 2:51 PM
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Thermoregulation and pregnancy
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I know you gals may be sick of my preggo threads, but here is the latest.

I have been so focused on trauma and pregnancy that I may have overlooked another aspect of climbing that may affect the fetus.

From McMurray et al:

Studies concerning exposure to heat during pregnancy have indicated that maternal hyperthermia can be teratogenic, causing primarily CNS abnormalities. Data, using the animal model, have consistently indicated that the effects of heat are most hazardous when exposure occurs in the first trimester of pregnancy. However, the human data from retrospective studies and sauna bath exposure are not conclusive. Since the risk potentially exists, physicians have been advising expectant mothers to avoid self-inflicted conditions that may result in core temperatures above 38.9 degrees C (102 degrees F). Research has indicated that exercise can result in core temperatures above the recommended level. Considering that early in pregnancy the mother may not appreciate her pregnancy and could exercise at high intensities, the possibility of exposing the fetus to hyperthermia exists. Of the limited studies of exercising pregnant women, there are no data suggesting that normal women actually exercise to a level of exertion that causes significant hyperthermia. However, these studies have been limited to nonathletic populations, in which the exercise has not been prolonged and of high intensity, or sufficient to induce dehydration. Other data indicate that if hyperthermia is a potential consideration for the exercising mother, then exercise in the water may be better as it provides for greater heat loss. The data concerning exposure to cold, although sketchy, suggest that unless the hypothermia is detrimental to maternal survival, there is minimal risk to the fetus.

Exercising through Your Pregnancy also warns exercising in fitness centers without air conditioning.

I wonder if pregnant women climbers become hyperthermic when climbing outside in the heat or in a gym without air conditioning.


kiwiprincess


Aug 9, 2009, 1:52 PM
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Re: [clee03m] Thermoregulation and pregnancy [In reply to]
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Just avoid going so hard you turn purple in the face. Like when you run hard. Generally climbing isn't intense for so long you overheat. Take it a little easier, rest more often if you feel you are getting hot.


acacongua


Aug 11, 2009, 7:12 PM
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Re: [clee03m] Thermoregulation and pregnancy [In reply to]
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You're really scaring me out of ever having kids. Keep up the good work.


clee03m


Aug 11, 2009, 10:24 PM
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Re: [acacongua] Thermoregulation and pregnancy [In reply to]
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Sorry...it's my style to obsessively research this kind of stuff, and I thought it may be fun to share some of the results. After even more research, it seems unlikely that there is a real concern regarding hyperthermia. Beside, something like 95% of women who carry to term delivers healthy babies without a problem, so don't let me scare you.

I think I am moving on from scientific literature to feminist literature regarding pregnancy and motherhood, so hopefully I won't be posting any more annoying posts Unimpressed


aerili


Aug 14, 2009, 3:11 PM
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Re: [clee03m] Thermoregulation and pregnancy [In reply to]
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Hi clee,

Yes, I think hyperthermia is really so individual-dependent. I say this from the point of view of someone who has trained pregnant women and had pregnant women in my (strenuous) muscle conditoning classes in the past, and who has also gone to school with/worked with female runners who ran into the very last WEEK of pregnancy without mishap.

I find the individual's prior fitness level, body comp, and conditioned activities really play a role in their ability to tolerate and perform in strenuous and hot environments. I also feel their doctors sometimes seem a bit over-cautious in their advice to them in this regard. But of course I understand a doc's concerns about liability (as my ex was a doc)...although I had one experience where the ob-gyn really seemed stuck in the 1950s, the way she was admonishing my client that she was "doing too much." My client was tolerating it all just fine.


clee03m


Aug 18, 2009, 8:55 AM
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Re: [aerili] Thermoregulation and pregnancy [In reply to]
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I know I promised to stay away from more alarming posts, but I thought I should share this info--especially since I think lot of us do 45 min traverses for aerobic endurance training in a hot gym.

From Exercising Through Your Pregnancy (which offers the most liberal advise of all that I've read so far):

"Pay attention to environmental conditions; specifically, avoid hot, humid environment and poor ventilation.....
To date we've only been able to identify one truly high-risk situation. That occurs when competitive athletes do extremely intense sets in the usual health club or gym environment. If they perform exercises that use extensive muscles mass (plyometrics and versa climbing are two examples), core temperature climbs rapidly and can exceed 102 degrees if they continue the activity for more than 15 or 20 minutes."


kostik


Aug 18, 2009, 9:30 PM
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clee03m wrote:
I know you gals may be sick of my preggo threads, but here is the latest.

Chris, are you pregnant?


aerili


Aug 25, 2009, 9:31 PM
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Re: [clee03m] Thermoregulation and pregnancy [In reply to]
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clee03m wrote:
If they perform exercises that use extensive muscles mass (plyometrics and versa climbing are two examples), core temperature climbs rapidly and can exceed 102 degrees if they continue the activity for more than 15 or 20 minutes."

If you've ever used a versa climber, you will know that it is typically far, far more intense than your average traversing work. I would be shocked if there are many people who could (or would want to) train on the versa climber for 15 minutes or longer.

Also, fwiw, running and jogging are low level plyometric exercises, but pregnant female runners still do it all the time.


clee03m


Aug 26, 2009, 7:58 AM
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Thanks. This puts my mind at rest. Thanks for your previous post, too. I guess I should have researched what versa climbing was. Now that I have researched it, I see how that would be much more intense than your typical traversing. Just in case, I bought a tympanic thermometer, but it's been so nice outside, I haven't had the pleasure of doing 45 min traverses in the gym :)


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