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onrockandice


Nov 16, 2009, 1:14 PM
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Opinion on Scarpa Inverno...
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I have a low angle all around kicker that I wear (in winter) in the same types of places and terrain as I'd wear a light trail shoe in summer.

I am looking for something that will allow me to do technical face climbing, glacial, HA and mixed climbing. I want the boot to be all day comfortable though as many of the mixed climbs are a good one or 2 hour hike from vehicles. I want to be able to belay, hike, approach, front-point in a boot. I will not be doing any alpine mountaineering. Strictly ice and mixed climbing but not at super steep elevations. If it requires a base camp I won't be there.

Is the Scarpa Inverno a good choice?


petsfed


Nov 16, 2009, 1:28 PM
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Re: [onrockandice] Opinion on Scarpa Inverno... [In reply to]
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So, you're looking for a boot for single day (albeit, all day) climbs?

Don't get a plastic boot.

Check out the La Sportiva Nepal EVOs or equivalent. You want a leather boot since it will climb better, weigh less, and be more comfortable for the hike.

Obviously, you don't want any of the Sportiva Trango line, or like a dedicated mixed climbing shoe, but if you're not working overnight, there's really no reason to get a double plastic boot.


kachoong


Nov 16, 2009, 1:52 PM
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petsfed wrote:
So, you're looking for a boot for single day (albeit, all day) climbs?

Don't get a plastic boot.

Check out the La Sportiva Nepal EVOs or equivalent. You want a leather boot since it will climb better, weigh less, and be more comfortable for the hike.

Obviously, you don't want any of the Sportiva Trango line, or like a dedicated mixed climbing shoe, but if you're not working overnight, there's really no reason to get a double plastic boot.

^^What he said!

I have Inverno's and although they are old (the newer ones aren't light) they are too heavy for what you want. You can climb ice and mixed in them but your performance will suffer.


herbertpowell


Nov 16, 2009, 1:56 PM
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Re: [onrockandice] Opinion on Scarpa Inverno... [In reply to]
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I'm not sure I understand. You want a boot that will allow you to do HA (high altitude)? Yet you won't be using a base camp or climbing steep stuff or doing alpine.

What kind of temperatures will you be in and what kind of altitudes are you talking about?

If you are doing "roadside" climbs, in warm areas at relatively low altitudes, get something light and soft. . . plenty of specialty boots out there for ice/mixed that aren't heavy plastic doubles meant for serious cold.


onrockandice


Nov 16, 2009, 2:04 PM
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High altitude because we have some awesome climbing around 11,000 feet. It's vertical, long and tons of fun but no base camps or anything. Park, hike a bit and then climb until you are numb. I realize that 11,000 is not HA to most but it is to me. Perhaps I should stick to the generally understood definitions so I don't cause confusion.
I was looking at these as well:

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/...;codesProcessed=true

A better choice?


(This post was edited by onrockandice on Nov 16, 2009, 2:06 PM)


herbertpowell


Nov 16, 2009, 2:09 PM
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Ok, a bit of a difference in semantics. I don't consider CONUS to have anything high altitude. Andes, Alaska, etc are high altitude ranges.

Those Scarpas could work. I've not used those, but Scarpa tends to fit my feet better than La Sportiva. I have a pair of Scarpa Freney XTs. They are fantastic, IMO. Very flexible ankle, so French technique is easy, good solid sole, so front pointing isn't brutal, rand for climbing rock without crampons on, goretex and insulation so they work down to decently cold temperatures (I'd be cautious about using them in serious cold though).


onrockandice


Nov 16, 2009, 2:14 PM
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I'm very cold sensitive. That is why I wanted the inverno. I thought it might be warmer.

Yeah CONUS is relatively flat compared to Asia. So maybe I need to upgrade a tad to get warmth so I'll continue to dig and investigate recommendations here.


onrockandice


Nov 16, 2009, 2:21 PM
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This looks like the real deal.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/...g-Boots-For-Men.html


herbertpowell


Nov 16, 2009, 2:22 PM
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Well, warmer boots tend to be heavier and clunkier, so you kind of trade performance for warmth.

Make sure your boots fit properly (a bit loose is better than too tight). I like to wear two socks, a thin liner, and a thick mountaineering sock (I'm partial to Patagonia, it is a very stiff sock that doesn't get beat up after multiple days). You can also try a vapor barrier sock too.

If you have narrow feet, the La Sportiva line is likely to fit you, and they have some pretty high performers that are still lighter than plastics while being warm.


petsfed


Nov 16, 2009, 4:18 PM
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onrockandice wrote:
This looks like the real deal.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/...g-Boots-For-Men.html

Look at more than just Sierra Trading Post. I love'em because they're just down the road from me, but I have access to the warehouse, whereas you likely don't.

I've found the Invernos to be overkill in all but the coldest and/or sloppiest of conditions. I definitely prefer my leather boots for general use. The invernos have served me well up to about 13,500', but that's not really the high altitude most boot makers are talking about.

A quality sock/boot combo will keep your feet a lot warmer than getting a boot meant for MUCH colder conditions than you'll likely experience.

You'll want something like these:
La Sportiva Boots
LS Lhotse
LS Nepal
I'd say avoid anything from the Trango line unless you can try them on. I've heard mixed accounts of their hiking ability. Their climbing ability is above reproach. As has been said, Sportiva boots fit a certain kind of foot.

Scarpa Boots
Unfortunately, Scarpa's webpage is flash driven, otherwise I'd link to the boots you should look at. The Summit GTX or the Freney XT are both really good boots. Again, try'em on, or be prepared to do a catch-and-release process until you find the right fit.

Millet, Kayland, Asolo, Lowa, and quite a few others also make spectacular mountaineering boots. Try them on.

You want a non-plastic, single boot. If it has a removable liner, forget it! You want a rand that will protect the leather/polyester/whatever from abrasion and allow you to jam the boot. You want heel and toe welts so that you can use cramp-o-matic or clip-on bindings. You want lightweight insulation, and a gore-tex liner (my leather boots lack gore-tex, and, after last season, I'm on the lookout for gore-tex socks, I really can't stress that last one enough).


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