Forums: Climbing Disciplines: Climbing Photography:
Questions
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Climbing Photography

Premier Sponsor:

 


rainman0915


Dec 11, 2009, 7:31 PM
Post #1 of 5 (1169 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 11, 2008
Posts: 233

Questions
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I am very new to photography, and would like to start doing climbing photography. I have a Nikon FG with a 52mm lens.

First Question: How is this set up for shooting climbing?

Second Question: Any sugestions on what type of film i should be using, as well as other technical settings?


rockforlife


Dec 11, 2009, 9:32 PM
Post #2 of 5 (1149 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 14, 2002
Posts: 563

Re: [rainman0915] Questions [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

rainman0915 wrote:
I am very new to photography, and would like to start doing climbing photography. I have a Nikon FG with a 52mm lens.

First Question: How is this set up for shooting climbing?

Second Question: Any sugestions on what type of film i should be using, as well as other technical settings?

This Is a great book to start, not about climbing. But if you are new to photography it will be great for you.


kriso9tails


Dec 13, 2009, 2:40 AM
Post #3 of 5 (1102 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 30, 2001
Posts: 7764

Re: [rainman0915] Questions [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Colour or black and white?


i_h8_choss


Dec 13, 2009, 4:37 AM
Post #4 of 5 (1089 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 2, 2007
Posts: 694

Re: [rainman0915] Questions [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

remember:

1. Go seek out beautiful natural light conditions during sunrise, sunset, and before, during and after storms.

2. The best climbing shots are usually taken from behind and above the climber, so rappel, climb a tree, take a ladder, climb the huge boulder that's 50 feet away, etc.

I think your camera is fine. As far as your lens, its really going to depend on the distance between you and the climber. I like fish eye lenses (10-24mm) but this means I have to get pretty close.

And on film.... this depends on what time of day you will shoot. If your shooting in the middle of the day, in bright sunlight, get ISO 100. If you shoot in lower light, like I stated above, get ISO 200 or 400. IMO, its better to shoot B&W during bright sunny days, and color in mornings and evenings. Fuji makes good film, but try different companies and see what works for you.

If you are going to invest some $ into this, I would suggest a tripod and remote control, some filters, and a fish eye lens (10-24mm) and a big zoom lens (300-500mm)


atlnq9


Dec 13, 2009, 9:02 AM
Post #5 of 5 (1068 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 9, 2007
Posts: 111

Re: [rainman0915] Questions [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Start with cheap print film until you have a good understanding of composition and lighting then switch to good slide film (Fuji Provia or Velvia). Work with creative angles, shots from the grround straight up are hard to make stand out against all the other angles. Climb an adjacent route and get a close up of the climber against the rock, shoot down on them from a close prospective and make the ground appear far away, back away from the route and get the whole cliff in the photo...


Forums : Climbing Disciplines : Climbing Photography

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook