Forums: Climbing Disciplines: Trad Climbing:
Gear Advice
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Trad Climbing

Premier Sponsor:

 


ccourtney_99


Feb 8, 2010, 7:29 PM
Post #1 of 14 (4268 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 13, 2007
Posts: 65

Gear Advice
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Hey Folks,

Just looking for some opinions on what type/brandnames of gear I should buy next for my trad rack. I might be getting a little ahead of myslef as I havent really started trad climbing as of yet but I plan to in the near future. I do have some gear but I would just like a little expert advice on what to purchase next. I have the basic rock climbing necessities ie. rope, cordage, shoes, belay device. Its just trad gear im interested in


I presently have:

- #1-#8 Metolius Ultralite Power Cams
- #1-#11 DMM Wallnuts
- Nut remover tool
- A host of slings, draws and beners


Im trying to build a basic rack that will bet me by at most areas. Im not gonna diving into the world of offwidths and big wall climbing, just something to get me by on some easy single pitch trad and short multipitch routes.

Cheers


ken21il


Feb 8, 2010, 7:38 PM
Post #2 of 14 (4265 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 27, 2006
Posts: 137

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Well... depends on where you climb.. you should talk to some of the local climbers or at least someone that leads trad there... as for now learning how to place nuts and maybe hexs on the ground first is a good start... DONT just plug those new shinny cams and go.. you need to get some experience following a experienced trad climber first.. plus im sure you spent some good money on what you've got... why not learn how to get some use out of it before you buy more!! ALSO dont forget BEER- for those experienced trad climbers you'll be following around!!


panacea82


Feb 8, 2010, 8:02 PM
Post #3 of 14 (4250 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 31, 2005
Posts: 77

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

My advice would be,
1. BD c4 .5-4
2.master cams blue-red
3. set of nuts ( i use BD but i have heard good things about trango's)
4. 5-10 Alpine draws
5. depending on where your climbing (NC, gunks) i would also get the 3 small tricams

i dont bother with hex's but some people like them

This is a great starter rack, after you pick this up and get some climbs under your belt you will know what else you will need.

Also if you have the cash try and get ultralight carabiners they will make a big difference on long climbs.


jaablink


Feb 9, 2010, 5:36 AM
Post #4 of 14 (4165 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 1, 2004
Posts: 537

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

It looks you have enough gear for most of the sp world , especially if you will be starting on 5.5 ‘s .The rock pro that you have looks good unless you are climbing cracks that need multiple same sized, or specialized pieces for a specific climb. I might go with a set of c3’s or small aliens , 21’ of 6mm cord + 3 - 3‘ lengths 5mm for prussic + book on rescue to show you how to use them, 5 lockers, a belay device like the reverso or guide, a comfortable non aggressive lace-up shoe , a book on anchor building, and some instruction from a seasoned competent leader.

I would sometimes climb with this 50 year old French man who’s rack was 3 cams, 1 set of hexes, and 2 sets of wire nuts. Jacque could lead up to 10 multi-pitch with no problem…He always says , it will make you better at using what you have if you limit your rack….I see his point, but I really prefer my modern rack , to his prehistoric one, but it all works as long as you know how to use it….
Be safe and have fun…


mhix13


Feb 9, 2010, 9:16 AM
Post #5 of 14 (4122 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 12, 2008
Posts: 85

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

U've got what you need to get on the rocks. I did what you did: buy a bunch of gear before actually climbing with it. I'm finding now that I have more gear than I need for just cragging. It would probably be the perfect amount for multipitch but I've never multipitched so I can't really know whether that statement is correct.

I also second the suggestions to find out what works where you climb. I would say get a set of the CAMP Tricams but those don't work in some places... you don't want to spend $100 on gear and get out to the crag and find out its worthless for your area. Have fun and be safe.


MS1


Feb 9, 2010, 11:09 AM
Post #6 of 14 (4089 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 24, 2009
Posts: 560

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

You have enough gear to start climbing. Stay on easy routes until selecting and placing gear becomes automatic. When you climb, pay attention to what you use, what you don't use, and when you need to run it out b/c you don't have anything that will fit. That will be the best guide for what to carry in the future.

Lots of small pockets? Look into tricams or TCUs.

Sustained hand cracks? Double up on midrange cams.

etc.

But to reiterate: You have plenty of gear to get started climbing.


jeepnphreak


Feb 9, 2010, 2:45 PM
Post #7 of 14 (4038 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 28, 2008
Posts: 1259

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

ccourtney_99 wrote:
Hey Folks,

Just looking for some opinions on what type/brandnames of gear I should buy next for my trad rack. I might be getting a little ahead of myslef as I havent really started trad climbing as of yet but I plan to in the near future. I do have some gear but I would just like a little expert advice on what to purchase next. I have the basic rock climbing necessities ie. rope, cordage, shoes, belay device. Its just trad gear im interested in


I presently have:

- #1-#8 Metolius Ultralite Power Cams
- #1-#11 DMM Wallnuts
- Nut remover tool
- A host of slings, draws and beners


Im trying to build a basic rack that will bet me by at most areas. Im not gonna diving into the world of offwidths and big wall climbing, just something to get me by on some easy single pitch trad and short multipitch routes.

Cheers

The best advice has been given. Find some one in you area that trad leads. They can tell you what is needed for a standard rack in your area. Trad gear is way too expensive to just be blurting out what gear I use or someone else uses.
A full range of cams may be enough... but you may have to double up and a few sizes and only a local familiar with the area can tell you for sure.


skinner


Feb 10, 2010, 10:30 AM
Post #8 of 14 (3934 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 31, 2004
Posts: 1747

Re: [ken21il] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

ken21il wrote:
Well... depends on where you climb.. you should talk to some of the local climbers or at least someone that leads trad there... as for now learning how to place nuts and maybe hexs on the ground first is a good start... DONT just plug those new shinny cams and go.. you need to get some experience following a experienced trad climber first.. plus im sure you spent some good money on what you've got... why not learn how to get some use out of it before you buy more!! ALSO dont forget BEER- for those experienced trad climbers you'll be following around!!

Ahh. the beer, yes.. amazing what that'll get you!
ken21il posted some good advice, people are all too eager to list out what they perceive as the components of "the perfect trad rack", knowing little or nothing about the area you plan on climbing in. Alberta is mostly sh*tty limestone and more often then not with a *standard* rack, (especially in the really compact limestone), your placements will be far and few between.

I've been trad climbing in Alberta for 30+ years, we put up 30-some new routes last summer alone, so I have a pretty good handle on what works here, and what doesn't.

That said, there is also a degree of personal preference involved, which brings us right back to ken21il's advice. You should definitely go out with some people who have lots of experience trad climbing in this area. This way you can "try-before-you-buy", as well learn how/why certain gear works well here.

I'd be glad to help you out if you want, message me and we'll get together.


(This post was edited by skinner on Feb 11, 2010, 9:27 PM)


uni_jim


Feb 11, 2010, 2:02 PM
Post #9 of 14 (3845 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 27, 2008
Posts: 429

Re: [skinner] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Shoot me a PM if you want to climb sometime, I am open to any grade/style and location. Rock season is on its way!!!


jawon


Feb 11, 2010, 11:29 PM
Post #10 of 14 (3767 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 10, 2005
Posts: 15

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I never leave home without my long cordelette no matter what kind of trad climb. I believe it's about 25-30 feet long, that I keep on my harness at all times. Has come in handy in many unexpected situations, sometimes to avoid epics. I can't think of a piece of equipment with a higher weight-to-value ratio!


csproul


Feb 12, 2010, 6:35 AM
Post #11 of 14 (3725 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 4, 2004
Posts: 1768

Re: [jawon] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

jawon wrote:
I never leave home without my long cordelette no matter what kind of trad climb. I believe it's about 25-30 feet long, that I keep on my harness at all times. Has come in handy in many unexpected situations, sometimes to avoid epics. I can't think of a piece of equipment with a higher weight-to-value ratio!
Ummmm...I think you meant lower weight-to-value or higher value-to-weight ratio


jawon


Feb 12, 2010, 9:04 AM
Post #12 of 14 (3700 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 10, 2005
Posts: 15

Re: [csproul] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

csproul wrote:
Ummmm...I think you meant lower weight-to-value or higher value-to-weight ratio

Yes, I stand corrected. Thx for the catch. Twas a late night post.


mrtristan


Feb 16, 2010, 9:33 AM
Post #13 of 14 (3535 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 21, 2002
Posts: 596

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

As others have said, you've got more than enough gear right now, especially if you don't even really trad climb yet! Having said that, I understand that planning gear purchases is fun and buying gear is even better, so...

A set of BD Camalots from .3 to 4 (that's 8 pieces and all of their double-axled units except their two biggest). At the very least, get .5 to 3. BD cams are freaking awesome pieces of work.

If you're doing multi pitch stuff, get some Metolius rope hooks. Those things are sweet.

I love my offset nuts. Mine are the older HB versions, but DMM now makes them.


qtm


Feb 16, 2010, 10:01 AM
Post #14 of 14 (3519 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 8, 2004
Posts: 548

Re: [ccourtney_99] Gear Advice [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Do you have any experience leading? If you're new to leading, I suggest doubling what you have now. Not necessarily buying it, but borrow what you can.

The "standard" rack is fine for an experienced leader; experience allows you to climb higher above gear, spot non-obvious placements, be more efficient placing gear thus saving energy. As a beginner, you're going to be nervous being more than 4' above your gear, only see classic placements, and fumble around with the pro trying several pieces before you find the one that fits. Having doubles lets you place more optimum pieces, rather than have to judge if marginal placements will hold.

As you gain experience, you'll learn to place gear more efficiently, learn when you can safely run it out. But in the beginning, sew it up. There's really no point in scaring yourself silly because you didn't bring up enough pro to feel safe.

If you can't borrow gear and don't want to buy more gear, start with shorter routes so you have plenty of gear to protect the entire route.


Forums : Climbing Disciplines : Trad Climbing

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook