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Prisoner of the Eiger
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k.l.k


Feb 11, 2010, 9:11 AM
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Prisoner of the Eiger
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Luca Signorelli has written a great piece on the Italian climber, Claudio Corti, over at UKClimbing:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/...les/page.php?id=2483

Highly recommended.


jgill


Feb 15, 2010, 9:19 PM
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Re: [k.l.k] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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Sometimes it's difficult to live down your failures (or successes). Bela Lugosi could not escape the cape and fangs.Unsure


lucasignorelli


Feb 16, 2010, 12:13 PM
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Re: [jgill] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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jgill wrote:
Sometimes it's difficult to live down your failures (or successes). Bela Lugosi could not escape the cape and fangs.Unsure

It's an interesting point John, because despite the obvious differences (and the fact that Lugosi was a very flamboyant character while Corti was absolutely the opposite) what they really had in common is the fact that both lives where somehow ruined by a "public image" that - literally - haunted them until the very end.

It's also interesting to see that as Lugosi was haunted by something he really wasn't - Dracula -, and he ended up identifying completely with it (" the only way to escape horror is to bury yourself in it" as Jean Genet once wrote). On the other hand Corti so was haunted by a " failure" which was not his own, but to whom he - at some point - was forced to identify completely.

In the end Corti he survived because he decided, at some point, that the only way out of that vicious circle was complete, unilateral forgiveness - but not forgefulness. I believe most of his friends never approved completely his decision not to pursuit some kind of "payback" against his tormentors, and I understand they tried to pressure him into doing "something" particularly when some of the most blatant evidence of deliberate wrongdoing emerged. But he never stepped back from his decision.

He still remained a haunted man, as his expression in this - the last interview he ever did, and one of the very few, will be evident to anyone

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7zM40G3PTM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFheqzc1-ck


(This post was edited by lucasignorelli on Feb 16, 2010, 12:47 PM)


k.l.k


Feb 16, 2010, 12:38 PM
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Re: [lucasignorelli] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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lucasignorelli wrote:
jgill wrote:
Sometimes it's difficult to live down your failures (or successes). Bela Lugosi could not escape the cape and fangs.Unsure

It's an interesting point John, because despite the obvious differences (and the fact that Lugosi was a very flamboyant character while Corti was absolutely the opposite) what they really had in common is the fact that both lives where somehow ruined by a "public image" that - literally - haunted them until the very end.

It's also interesting to see that as Lugosi was haunted by something he really wasn't - Dracula -, and he ended up identifying completely with it (" the only way to escape horror is to bury yourself in it" as Jean Genet once wrote). On the other hand Corti so was haunted by a " failure" which was not his own, but to whom he - at some point - was forced to identify completely.

In the end Corti he survived because he decided, at some point, that the only way out of that vicious circle was complete, unilateral forgiveness - but not forgefulness. I believe most of his friends never approved completely his decision not to pursuit some kind of "payback" against his tormentors, and I understand they tried to pressure him into doing "something" particularly when some of the most blatant evidence of deliberate wrongdoing emerged. But he never stepped back from his decision.

He still remained a haunted man, as his expression in this - the last interview he ever did, and one of the very few, will be evident to anyone

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7zM40G3PTM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFheqzc1-ck

Thanks Luca. The way this site works, you have to actually insert the tags to make the links work.


lucasignorelli


Feb 16, 2010, 12:53 PM
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Re: [k.l.k] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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k.l.k wrote:
Thanks Luca. The way this site works, you have to actually insert the tags to make the links work.[/quote]

Thanks for the warning - I've corrected my post


boymeetsrock


Feb 17, 2010, 10:38 AM
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Re: [k.l.k] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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k.l.k wrote:
Luca Signorelli has written a great piece on the Italian climber, Claudio Corti, over at UKClimbing:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/...les/page.php?id=2483

Highly recommended.

Bump for a really great and informative read. Nice discussion on this thread too. Thanks all!


ClimbClimb


Apr 18, 2010, 7:37 PM
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Re: [boymeetsrock] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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I read it once when it first appeared, adn just re-read portions of it again. Indeed, great link. thanks k.i.k and lucaS for writing it in the first place.


moose_droppings


Apr 18, 2010, 9:04 PM
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Re: [k.l.k] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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Great read, thanks for the link.

It's terrible how an ego tried to paint an inaccurate picture for so many years. Surely Harrer knew differently.


napoleon_in_rags


Apr 19, 2010, 2:51 PM
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Re: [moose_droppings] Prisoner of the Eiger [In reply to]
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I've read both "The White Spider" and "The Climb Up to Hell". I remember wondering what Corti's perspective was.

I wonder if climbing books are more sensational than other sports. "Into Thin Air", "Forever on the Mountain", and a few others provide a one sided portrayal of a climbing accident.

(edited for spelling)


(This post was edited by napoleon_in_rags on Apr 19, 2010, 2:53 PM)


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