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Eccentric Loading and Tendonosis
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jmeizis


Aug 3, 2010, 11:09 PM
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Eccentric Loading and Tendonosis
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So I've got some tenderness on the palm side of the proximal phalanx of my middle finger. Sometimes I have the same thing with my ring finger. It comes and goes, depending on how often I'm climbing. There's no inflammation or swelling. Doesn't really hurt when climbing but generally becomes more tender. No precipitating event where it started hurting, just kind of a gradual thing. Sounds a lot like tendonosis but I'm too cheap to go to the doctor to have them tell me what I'm relatively sure I already know.

So was looking at treatments of tendonosis and noticed one of them was eccentric loading and read a few papers about how eccentric loading was used to treat tendonosis of the achilles tendon with good results. I had to look up what eccentric loading was but the mechanics sounded a lot like what happens during campusing. Now I'm thinking just regular campusing is probably not the way to help a tendon injury (more likely the opposite) but am I way off in my understanding of what is meant by the term eccentric loading? If not then would some sort of sub-body weight campusing be something that I might use in my regimen of finger tendon therapy along with ice, stretching, and massage?

If not how would one eccentrically load their fingers?


(This post was edited by jmeizis on Aug 3, 2010, 11:09 PM)


onceahardman


Aug 4, 2010, 3:38 PM
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Re: [jmeizis] Eccentric Loading and Tendonosis [In reply to]
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jmeizis wrote:
So I've got some tenderness on the palm side of the proximal phalanx of my middle finger. Sometimes I have the same thing with my ring finger. It comes and goes, depending on how often I'm climbing. There's no inflammation or swelling. Doesn't really hurt when climbing but generally becomes more tender. No precipitating event where it started hurting, just kind of a gradual thing. Sounds a lot like tendonosis but I'm too cheap to go to the doctor to have them tell me what I'm relatively sure I already know.

So was looking at treatments of tendonosis and noticed one of them was eccentric loading and read a few papers about how eccentric loading was used to treat tendonosis of the achilles tendon with good results. I had to look up what eccentric loading was but the mechanics sounded a lot like what happens during campusing. Now I'm thinking just regular campusing is probably not the way to help a tendon injury (more likely the opposite) but am I way off in my understanding of what is meant by the term eccentric loading? If not then would some sort of sub-body weight campusing be something that I might use in my regimen of finger tendon therapy along with ice, stretching, and massage?

If not how would one eccentrically load their fingers?

First, when you say there is "no inflammation (or swelling)"...there probably is an inflammatory component to this. It is probably not purely mechanical, especially when it's flared up.

second, the palmar surface of the proximal phalanx is the location of the A2 pulley, which is a common injury in climbers.

On to your main points/questions. There is an eccentric component to campusing, as there is to most functional activities, like running and jumping. But if your aim is to find a treatment modality which will be therapeutic, I'd urge you to find an activity with much more control. Start with weights or elastic bands. It takes months to remodel poorly healed connective tissue. Be patient, go slowly, do not ever make it worse. Stick with it, though. You will probably start to see consistent improvement in 4 weeks, and a pretty solid repair in 6 months, assuming you are diligent.


squierbypetzl
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Sep 8, 2010, 1:18 AM
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Re: [onceahardman] Eccentric Loading and Tendonosis [In reply to]
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Sub-bodyweight hangboarding I know, but sub-body weight campusing? how exactly would that work?


onceahardman


Sep 8, 2010, 2:56 PM
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Re: [squierbypetzl] Eccentric Loading and Tendonosis [In reply to]
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squierbypetzl wrote:
Sub-bodyweight hangboarding I know, but sub-body weight campusing? how exactly would that work?

Hmmm, I don't think you meant to reply to me....

But you could do sub-body weight campusing by creatively setting up a campus board in a pool.

I still wouldn't recommend it, due to lack of control, but as a purely theoretical construct, it's possible.


squierbypetzl
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Sep 8, 2010, 6:58 PM
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Re: [onceahardman] Eccentric Loading and Tendonosis [In reply to]
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Yeah, sorry Hardman, I didn't mean you, but you give a plausible answer. I'm just saying that of all the getups I can imagine for sbw campus, I think it'd be much less work to just top rope or do something else.


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