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Exercise for high-step squat
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fx101


Sep 22, 2010, 8:56 AM
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Exercise for high-step squat
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Hello, I've been struggling to find a good exercise to simulate the movements when you stand up on one leg after a high-step (think high step, flagging to balance, and then wanting to stand up on the high foot). I find I tend to use leverage to avoid exerting too much force with my leg, but in a crimpy situation I'm stuck.

Leg press? Someone I talked to suggested body-weight squats while standing on a pedestal. Maybe that's better?


adh24


Sep 22, 2010, 9:15 AM
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Re: [fx101] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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Step Ups are a good exercise that comes to mind. Using a pedestal (stool, step, etc… something stable) and holding say a 20lb dumbbell in each hand step up onto the pedestal using only your left leg then step down with the same leg. Alternate this process between both legs. As you get stronger increase the height of the apparatus you’re stepping up onto and/or increase weight.


iknowfear


Sep 22, 2010, 9:38 AM
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Re: [fx101] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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Might I add another suggestion. Sometimes a percieved weakness in High-Steps is a real weakness of genral climbing technique.

I don't know at what level you climb and for how long you've been at it.
But, look at another climber on the same route, does he (or she, women have mostly a better technique) do as much high steps as you do?

Cheers


fx101


Sep 22, 2010, 9:44 AM
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Re: [iknowfear] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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iknowfear wrote:
Might I add another suggestion. Sometimes a percieved weakness in High-Steps is a real weakness of genral climbing technique.

I don't know at what level you climb and for how long you've been at it.
But, look at another climber on the same route, does he (or she, women have mostly a better technique) do as much high steps as you do?

Cheers

It's not that I perform many high-steps. In fact, generally one or two on a route. But when I AM forced to do a high-step, it's generally because there's no better move. In that case, I probably have marginal hand-holds and have found a decent foot-hold above. I can minimize exerted effort by flagging and keeping good balance, but this requires more loading on the arms. I'd like to be able to use more leg.


ceebo


Sep 22, 2010, 4:32 PM
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Re: [fx101] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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I had this a few times ( i hope i understand what you mean). I dont think you need to triain the legs, you just need to try and generate a tiny bit of momentum from your hips. It looks like you are trying to dry hump the wallCrazy. Perhaps my technique is a bad, but the way i do that move is by not locking my knee over my foot.. its just felt better and gave me like an inch or 2 extra to genrate some dynamic movement wich i follw up with the high leg.

You can also not flag, and keep your other foot right down on the lower hold. Then you can foot press off that whil at the same time doing the same hip humping thing, then your lower leg will just go into the flag posistion kinde dynamiclly as your moving up off your higher leg.

Sorry if im off base here.


Of btw, their is a static style thing you can do.. i hope i can explain it well to understand. You can lock your knee right over, and then your entire trunk lean over to the left so its almost horizontel and then counter some of it with right leg flagging out opposit, Your right arm may get straith now if it is right kinde place. I know it sounds odd, but doing that seems to make the push from hight step leg alone much much easier with no other source to help. Obviusly it is vice versa for other side.


(This post was edited by ceebo on Sep 22, 2010, 4:47 PM)


bustloose


Sep 23, 2010, 11:57 AM
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Re: [fx101] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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if you're suggesting you don't have enough leg strength to stand up on one leg after moving into a "high-step" move, then the rather obvious answer is to strengthen your legs. there are a myriad of choices for you, but i would suggest an all round functional exercise like squats.

better technique, balance and weight distribution will also help to alleviate the feeling that you're doing a single leg press...


kaizen


Sep 23, 2010, 12:18 PM
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Pistols

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/legpower.htm


aerili


Sep 23, 2010, 1:51 PM
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Re: [fx101] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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Not sure if lack of strength is really the issue here, but let's say it is. Body weight single leg squats could be helpful, but you need to be able to train them down to at least 90 degrees or slightly less, otherwise your sticking point may not change much. (In this case, the sticking point will occur when the knee is at an acute angle during the beginning of your high step and means the muscle is at its greatest disadvantage to generate force.)

Another option is to do deep lunges off a raised step (with added weight if necessary). Provided your lunge base is wide enough, this should not hurt your knee joint yet still force the quads to work hard to lift your weight from a mechanically disadvantaged starting position (somewhat similar to high stepping, although the plane of motion will not be identical). Try not to push off with your rear foot on the floor as well.

If you get stronger and still have a problem, then you should re-assess your technique as well (although doing both at the same time is probably most effective to resolve the problem).


ryanb


Sep 23, 2010, 2:38 PM
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Re: [fx101] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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fx101 wrote:
Hello, I've been struggling to find a good exercise to simulate the movements when you stand up on one leg after a high-step (think high step, flagging to balance, and then wanting to stand up on the high foot). I find I tend to use leverage to avoid exerting too much force with my leg, but in a crimpy situation I'm stuck.

Leg press? Someone I talked to suggested body-weight squats while standing on a pedestal. Maybe that's better?

You are probably strong enough to pull off a high step (it takes less strength then carrying a rack and rope to many crags) but it sounds like you are missing a step ... after you get your foot up there you need to rock/ooze your body over the high foot and drop your low leg straight down so that all your weight is on the high foot but you can drag the low along the wall as you press it out.

Watch Wolfgang Güllich pull off something similar here:
http://www.youtube.com/...=FvH9AKBwiRc#t=4m50s

I find standing one legged yoga poses to be the best training for this.


(This post was edited by ryanb on Sep 23, 2010, 2:41 PM)


Partner rgold


Sep 23, 2010, 3:34 PM
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Re: [ryanb] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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I used to balance on a small bar (a gymnastics high bar, actually) and do one-legged deep knee bends on that. Ignoring the balance part, you can do the same thing much nearer the ground on any kind of box or pedestal. You can build up the requisite strength by holding on and helping yourself a bit with one hand.

I think it goes without saying that extreme caution is needed at first until you are strong, since a fully flexed knee is vulnerable if the muscles aren't strong enough.

Stand at the edge of the box so that the free leg can hang down. These squats are easier than pistols, which require you to also hold the the non-raising leg extended to keep it off the floor, rather than being able to let it hang down more naturally.

There is also a counter-intuitive body-position secret. There you are with your foot on the high hold. As you move onto it, your thigh goes from vertical to horizontal, at which point, if the motion is relatively static, you are practically or actually sitting on your heel with your thigh horizontal. Kinda comfy, but you soon discover that you are stuck.

I don't think there are all that many people who can statically get up from that position without a lot help from the hands. The problem is compounded by the fact that folks tend to want to reach up and pull on something---anything---and by so doing get their torso in a very disadvantageous position for standing up.

The counterintuitive trick is that you have to lean over and down until your chest is practically touching your knee. This shifts the center of gravity over the foot and breaks your ass loose from your heel. In this position, you can still reach high with one hand, but the other hand may well be below the high-stepping foot. If you can pull up with the low hand, so much the better.


johnsobers


Sep 26, 2010, 7:20 PM
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If you could only do one weight training exercise to promote muscle strength, tone, power, and core strength it would be hard not to choose the full squat exercise. The beauty and simplicity of the full squat is often overlooked by recreational exercisers, but most elite and pro athletes use the squat as the basis of a well-rounded weight training program.
___________________________________
johnsobers87

[url=href="http://www.trainwithmeonline.com/stretching_exercises.html ]Stretching Exercises


bustloose


Sep 27, 2010, 11:12 AM
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Re: [johnsobers] Exercise for high-step squat [In reply to]
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johnsobers wrote:
If you could only do one weight training exercise to promote muscle strength, tone, power, and core strength it would be hard not to choose the full squat exercise. The beauty and simplicity of the full squat is often overlooked by recreational exercisers, but most elite and pro athletes use the squat as the basis of a well-rounded weight training program.
___________________________________
johnsobers87

[url=href="http://www.trainwithmeonline.com/stretching_exercises.html ]Stretching Exercises


fact.


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