Forums: Climbing Information: Technique & Training:
Training routine - help!!
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Technique & Training

Premier Sponsor:

 


MidnightR


Nov 1, 2010, 12:32 PM
Post #1 of 5 (2949 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 15, 2010
Posts: 42

Training routine - help!!
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

OK I've been climbing for a few months & I'm climbing around V3 (I've done a few V4 but not many). Top roping I'm doing 5c (English), although I spend the vast majority of my time bouldering.

At the moment I usually go to the climbing gym 3/4 days a week on Monday/Wed/Fri/Sat, for around 3-4 hours at a time. I run every day for 30minutes, do sit ups, and increase this gradually.

I feel like I need some sort of climbing routine. I don't feel like it's a problem of technique at the moment which is stopping me progress. I feel that I lack strength in my fingers & arms.

What more can I do in my days off to help my climbing & fitness? I can't climb everyday, my muscles just cannot take it, I already injured myself a few weeks ago climbing for too long (my biceps, so I'm trying to take it easy on them by not doing overhangs etc).

Any links to training routines? I really want to progress to V4/5 asap so I can try new routes. There are a lot more routes in the V4-6 range at my gym.

Generally when I go climbing I start doing a few easy problems then work on problems around my level. I continue this till it's time to go home ^^ People tell me I would improve more if I do more training instead of climbing? Any tips on making training less boring lol?!?!

Thanks!!


spikeddem


Nov 1, 2010, 12:55 PM
Post #2 of 5 (2933 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 27, 2007
Posts: 6319

Re: [MidnightR] Training routine - help!! [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Continue getting mileage under your belt. Focus on making every route you do look V0. Seriously.

Don't push yourself so hard to get to V4-V6 so quickly. You put yourself at serious risk of injuring a tendon. Doing so can easily put you out of the game for longer than you have even been climbing. The reason for this is that tendons take much, much longer strengthen and adapt to the stress of climbing than your muscles do. Thus, your muscles can pull with forces that your tendons won't be able to handle. When we cross the border is not as obvious as we may prefer it to to be.

Focus on movement training, not physical training. The fruits of physical training are not fully sprouted until your movement and technique is as good as you can get it. Getting a V3 to look V0--in general, in my opinion--demonstrates good technique.

On your rest days...REST.


MidnightR


Nov 1, 2010, 1:20 PM
Post #3 of 5 (2915 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 15, 2010
Posts: 42

Re: [spikeddem] Training routine - help!! [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

spikeddem wrote:
Continue getting mileage under your belt. Focus on making every route you do look V0. Seriously.

Don't push yourself so hard to get to V4-V6 so quickly. You put yourself at serious risk of injuring a tendon. Doing so can easily put you out of the game for longer than you have even been climbing. The reason for this is that tendons take much, much longer strengthen and adapt to the stress of climbing than your muscles do. Thus, your muscles can pull with forces that your tendons won't be able to handle. When we cross the border is not as obvious as we may prefer it to to be.

Focus on movement training, not physical training. The fruits of physical training are not fully sprouted until your movement and technique is as good as you can get it. Getting a V3 to look V0--in general, in my opinion--demonstrates good technique.

On your rest days...REST.

Ah ha, your point has reminded me of a question I wanted to ask. There are limited problems at my gym obviously, and it doesn't take long for me to finish everything at my level. By getting a V3 to look like a V0 do you mean doing a problem you've done over and over again till it becomes really easy? Am I going to get much benefit from repeating problems I've already done?

Ideally the way I'd like to climb is to never try many problems above my level, but stay at or below it. The problem is I finish everything, then all I'm left with is really hard stuff so end up trying those over and over again (which doesn't seem to get me far tbh).

Would I be better off doing the routes I've already done over and over till they become very easy, then try the harder stuff (which by that point should be at my level)?

I don't need to rest every part of my body though. For instance I don't take breaks from running because my body doesn't need it. I'm asking if there are other things I can do, other muscle groups that require less rest (I can still do sit ups every day too, they don't require rest :-\)

Cheers :-)


(This post was edited by MidnightR on Nov 1, 2010, 1:37 PM)


spikeddem


Nov 1, 2010, 4:14 PM
Post #4 of 5 (2829 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 27, 2007
Posts: 6319

Re: [MidnightR] Training routine - help!! [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

MidnightR wrote:
spikeddem wrote:
Continue getting mileage under your belt. Focus on making every route you do look V0. Seriously.

Don't push yourself so hard to get to V4-V6 so quickly. You put yourself at serious risk of injuring a tendon. Doing so can easily put you out of the game for longer than you have even been climbing. The reason for this is that tendons take much, much longer strengthen and adapt to the stress of climbing than your muscles do. Thus, your muscles can pull with forces that your tendons won't be able to handle. When we cross the border is not as obvious as we may prefer it to to be.

Focus on movement training, not physical training. The fruits of physical training are not fully sprouted until your movement and technique is as good as you can get it. Getting a V3 to look V0--in general, in my opinion--demonstrates good technique.

On your rest days...REST.

Ah ha, your point has reminded me of a question I wanted to ask. There are limited problems at my gym obviously, and it doesn't take long for me to finish everything at my level. By getting a V3 to look like a V0 do you mean doing a problem you've done over and over again till it becomes really easy? Am I going to get much benefit from repeating problems I've already done?

Hmm. Well. Your goal should be to essentially make it look to others like you're climbing something that is easy for you on all these climbs. In general, poor technique often manifests itself in unnecessary swings (even small ones!). Make sure you're climbing all the problems the easiest possible way, and focus on looking fluid and relaxed. By doing this, you can learn a lot about movement while minimizing risk of injury. This knowledge about movement will transfer to other climbs, undoubtedly.

In reply to:
Ideally the way I'd like to climb is to never try many problems above my level, but stay at or below it. The problem is I finish everything, then all I'm left with is really hard stuff so end up trying those over and over again (which doesn't seem to get me far tbh).

Although one way to get strong is to try routes where you can only do 1-2 moves before reaching failure, it comes with a risk of injury. Moreover, it's like any other method of practicing--it reaches a point of diminishing gains at which time you should cycle it out for something else. In any case, given your short climbing history, it's likely your technique is what is causing you to peel off from these problems. This goes back to the movement training. The whole idea of learning better technique is to climb at a higher level without even needing to to be physically stronger. You will notice benefits from proper movement training way more quickly than you will see benefits from other kind of training.

In reply to:
Would I be better off doing the routes I've already done over and over till they become very easy, then try the harder stuff (which by that point should be at my level)?

I'd say yes. It also sounds like your gym might not have a good turnover rate when it comes to stripping the wall and setting new problems. One thing you should avoid is proceeding to the next grade immediately after sending the current grade. For example, a climber's whose history is (V5, V5, V4, V4, V4, V3, V3, V3, V3, V3, 3, V3, countless V2s) is much more prepared for V6 than someone whose history is (V5,V4, V3, V3, V3, bunch of V2s). That fact is a bit off-topic, since you can clearly only work with routes you've been given*, but it should be kept in mind as you progress. (*You can always make up your own routes with others.)


In reply to:
I don't need to rest every part of my body though. For instance I don't take breaks from running because my body doesn't need it. I'm asking if there are other things I can do, other muscle groups that require less rest (I can still do sit ups every day too, they don't require rest :-\)

Hmm. At a simplified level, the body's need for rest results from stressful foreign stimulus. To say your body doesn't need a break from running or that you could do sit-ups every day is kind of unfair. If you presented your body with the correct running or ab workout, you bet your ass your body would be begging for rest. Odds are your body is just no longer all that stimulated by your current running workout or ab workout. I mean, you could climb V0 every day for a month without rest, too, right? It's about the intensity and how foreign the stimulus is to your body.

More on-topic, When it comes to dealing with rest, in my opinion, the feeling your body is telling you should only be supplementary to a strictly followed guideline that you layout ahead of time. That is to say that, for example, just because your tweaked finger feels fine today doesn't mean you should climb on it if you originally told yourself to wait a full two weeks and it's only been one week.

If you want to do some kind of general fitness activity on your rest days, the less similar to climbing the better. That's all I can really say on that, I guess.

Here, read this on your off days. It should answer a lot of your questions.


TyCSU


Nov 2, 2010, 7:01 PM
Post #5 of 5 (2709 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 30, 2010
Posts: 1

Re: [spikeddem] Training routine - help!! [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Thanks spikeddem, your willingness to provide insightful advice has clarified quite a few of my own questions. Great responce! Cool


Forums : Climbing Information : Technique & Training

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?
$292.46 (10% off)
$17.95 (10% off)
$197.06 (10% off)



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook