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Shooting photos on one pitch routes
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dbogardus


Apr 24, 2011, 6:26 PM
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Shooting photos on one pitch routes
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I'm curious how most photographers get the positioning they want on short routes, or rather where rapping is available.

Do most have ascenders and go up with the climber while shooting or just camp out a good position until the climber gets closer?

Because timing and quick adjustments are so important in climbing photography, I would imagine using an ascender would be all around the way to go but I'm curious to hear other perspectives.


Partner abe_ascends


Apr 24, 2011, 8:11 PM
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Re: [dbogardus] Shooting photos on one pitch routes [In reply to]
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dbogardus wrote:
I'm curious how most photographers get the positioning they want on short routes, or rather where rapping is available.

Do most have ascenders and go up with the climber while shooting or just camp out a good position until the climber gets closer?

Because timing and quick adjustments are so important in climbing photography, I would imagine using an ascender would be all around the way to go but I'm curious to hear other perspectives.

The good ones do whatever it takes to get the shot, which may involve all sorts of rigging. Check out Simon Carter's website, I'm sure I've seen a short doc of his rigging methods there at some point.


guangzhou


Apr 25, 2011, 12:30 AM
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Realy depends on the area. Sometime I hang from the belay of the route or the next route over. I climb tree nearby, or for boulder problem, use ladders to position myself.


newrivermike


Apr 25, 2011, 6:51 AM
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Re: [dbogardus] Shooting photos on one pitch routes [In reply to]
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It's kind of sad but most of the professional pictures you see in mags are very posed. Instead of trying to quickly get into position to shoot just ask your climber to stop so you can jug up a bit or reposition. I've witnessed some pro climbers and pro photographers working together to get a good pic. It's not climbing at all. It's photography. Sometimes they will have the athlete repeat the same move 20 times, tweaking the exposure, angle, whatever. Capturing a true moment, such as a climber's eyes during an onsight effort, is much more difficult.


dbogardus


Apr 25, 2011, 7:14 AM
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"Yo brah, just pull through that 13b roof again, I forgot I had my lens cap off".


darkgift06


Apr 25, 2011, 9:12 AM
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abe_ascends wrote:
dbogardus wrote:
I'm curious how most photographers get the positioning they want on short routes, or rather where rapping is available.

Do most have ascenders and go up with the climber while shooting or just camp out a good position until the climber gets closer?

Because timing and quick adjustments are so important in climbing photography, I would imagine using an ascender would be all around the way to go but I'm curious to hear other perspectives.

The good ones do whatever it takes to get the shot, which may involve all sorts of rigging. Check out Simon Carter's website, I'm sure I've seen a short doc of his rigging methods there at some point.


http://www.onsight.com.au/ Simon Carter's site.


jeanneret


May 3, 2011, 6:34 PM
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Re: [newrivermike] Shooting photos on one pitch routes [In reply to]
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newrivermike wrote:
It's kind of sad but most of the professional pictures you see in mags are very posed. Instead of trying to quickly get into position to shoot just ask your climber to stop so you can jug up a bit or reposition. I've witnessed some pro climbers and pro photographers working together to get a good pic. It's not climbing at all. It's photography. Sometimes they will have the athlete repeat the same move 20 times, tweaking the exposure, angle, whatever. Capturing a true moment, such as a climber's eyes during an onsight effort, is much more difficult.

I understand why they do it, but I agree with you. It loses that raw emotion that you would get otherwise.

@dbogardus, I'm currently taking shots of climbers in South Korea and they don't wait for anyone. So I have to be able to set up fast. You can waste all that effort chasing a climber trying to get that shot. I suggest that you know exactly what shot you want before even setting up an anchor. That way, you know exactly where you need to be. I use a variation of the RADS system because it's quick to set up and I can rapidly change from ascending to descending. It involves one ascender, a grigri, a pulley, and a foot loop. I can have it up in less than 15 seconds.

Here's my "credentials" to back up my advice...www.jjeanneret.com

I'd be happy to send pictures of my rigging if you think it'd be helpful.

-Jean


(This post was edited by jeanneret on May 3, 2011, 6:35 PM)


cornstateclimber


May 3, 2011, 8:24 PM
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what? you dont want the ass shots from the ground?


jeanneret


May 3, 2011, 9:49 PM
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There's nothing wrong with a little booty every now and then.


pico23


May 5, 2011, 12:01 PM
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Re: [jeanneret] Shooting photos on one pitch routes [In reply to]
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jeanneret wrote:
newrivermike wrote:
It's kind of sad but most of the professional pictures you see in mags are very posed. Instead of trying to quickly get into position to shoot just ask your climber to stop so you can jug up a bit or reposition. I've witnessed some pro climbers and pro photographers working together to get a good pic. It's not climbing at all. It's photography. Sometimes they will have the athlete repeat the same move 20 times, tweaking the exposure, angle, whatever. Capturing a true moment, such as a climber's eyes during an onsight effort, is much more difficult.

I understand why they do it, but I agree with you. It loses that raw emotion that you would get otherwise.

@dbogardus, I'm currently taking shots of climbers in South Korea and they don't wait for anyone. So I have to be able to set up fast. You can waste all that effort chasing a climber trying to get that shot. I suggest that you know exactly what shot you want before even setting up an anchor. That way, you know exactly where you need to be. I use a variation of the RADS system because it's quick to set up and I can rapidly change from ascending to descending. It involves one ascender, a grigri, a pulley, and a foot loop. I can have it up in less than 15 seconds.

Here's my "credentials" to back up my advice...www.jjeanneret.com

I'd be happy to send pictures of my rigging if you think it'd be helpful.

-Jean

When I google RADS system, I get rape aggression defense.

I'd love to see your setup.

Thanks!


Jip182


May 5, 2011, 12:11 PM
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cool video here
http://www.iclimb.com/products/Mtn-Photographer-Clip-from-Higher-Ground.html


kachoong


May 5, 2011, 12:43 PM
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Here's a pic I took of our own Philbox and his "trolleyline" setup. He basically uses a static line that's fixed out away from the cliff, plus the usual jugging/rapping line. It helps get out from the cliff a little. The small rope coiled in his lap is a short length to tension close to or slacken away from the pulley, which allows him to come in or out from the cliff.




guangzhou


May 5, 2011, 6:48 PM
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Re: [jeanneret] Shooting photos on one pitch routes [In reply to]
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jeanneret wrote:
newrivermike wrote:
It's kind of sad but most of the professional pictures you see in mags are very posed. Instead of trying to quickly get into position to shoot just ask your climber to stop so you can jug up a bit or reposition. I've witnessed some pro climbers and pro photographers working together to get a good pic. It's not climbing at all. It's photography. Sometimes they will have the athlete repeat the same move 20 times, tweaking the exposure, angle, whatever. Capturing a true moment, such as a climber's eyes during an onsight effort, is much more difficult.

I understand why they do it, but I agree with you. It loses that raw emotion that you would get otherwise.

@dbogardus, I'm currently taking shots of climbers in South Korea and they don't wait for anyone. So I have to be able to set up fast. You can waste all that effort chasing a climber trying to get that shot. I suggest that you know exactly what shot you want before even setting up an anchor. That way, you know exactly where you need to be. I use a variation of the RADS system because it's quick to set up and I can rapidly change from ascending to descending. It involves one ascender, a grigri, a pulley, and a foot loop. I can have it up in less than 15 seconds.

Here's my "credentials" to back up my advice...www.jjeanneret.com

I'd be happy to send pictures of my rigging if you think it'd be helpful.

-Jean

Where are you shooting i Korea?

Korea, especially the long Granite cracks near Soul are on my hit list this season or next. The climbing looks excellent, especially during the week when everyone is working.

You building your own website?


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