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hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance
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granite_grrl


Apr 29, 2011, 12:44 PM
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hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance
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I got a kitchen table a few weeks ago that I rather like, but it's pretty beat up.

I was going to strip it, sand it, reseal it.....but the wood has cracked where it's been glued together on the table top:






Image 1 and 2 are of the same, and worst split. Images 3 and 4 are at opposite ends of the same joint pieces.

So....what's the best way to fix this?


imnotclever


Apr 29, 2011, 12:57 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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Pop it off the base, clean up the edges on the tablesaw and then biscuit it back together.


edge


Apr 29, 2011, 1:01 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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Well, it split at the glue joint, so there is now glue on both sides of the split, so squeezing more in and clamping it won't work; the new glue will just be bonding to the old, failed glue.

The only real way to fix it is to take the top off, run it through a table saw where the joint gets removed by the blade, and then regluing on the bare wood.

I wish I could tell you that there is an easier way, but there isn't.


edge


Apr 29, 2011, 1:04 PM
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Re: [imnotclever] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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imnotclever wrote:
Pop it off the base, clean up the edges on the tablesaw and then biscuit it back together.

Biscuits aren't necessary if you get a good, tight fit of wood to wood; the glue joint would then be stronger than the surrounding wood.

They might help you line the piece up if it is cupped lengthwise, but I would just glue and clamp it and line it up with a rubber mallet to knock it into place as you tighten the clamps. Run your finger across the joint to feel when it is flush; more accurate than doing it by sight.


(This post was edited by edge on Apr 29, 2011, 1:04 PM)


granite_grrl


Apr 29, 2011, 1:13 PM
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Damn, no way to cheat? The table is pretty darn solid, I just want to make it look pretty.


traddad


Apr 29, 2011, 1:13 PM
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Both of Edge's comments +1.

I'd probably go at it with my jointer plane rather than the saw..

Yes, I am a curmudgeon.


climber49er


Apr 29, 2011, 1:26 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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granite_grrl wrote:
Damn, no way to cheat? The table is pretty darn solid, I just want to make it look pretty.

Nope, if you try to glue it as is, you'll just make busy work for yourself.


imnotclever


Apr 29, 2011, 1:28 PM
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edge wrote:
imnotclever wrote:
Pop it off the base, clean up the edges on the tablesaw and then biscuit it back together.

Biscuits aren't necessary if you get a good, tight fit of wood to wood; the glue joint would then be stronger than the surrounding wood.

They might help you line the piece up if it is cupped lengthwise, but I would just glue and clamp it and line it up with a rubber mallet to knock it into place as you tighten the clamps. Run your finger across the joint to feel when it is flush; more accurate than doing it by sight.

But I've got a biscuit jointer, but no regular jointer. I'm left with table saw tight joints.


edge


Apr 29, 2011, 1:46 PM
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Re: [imnotclever] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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imnotclever wrote:
edge wrote:
imnotclever wrote:
Pop it off the base, clean up the edges on the tablesaw and then biscuit it back together.

Biscuits aren't necessary if you get a good, tight fit of wood to wood; the glue joint would then be stronger than the surrounding wood.

They might help you line the piece up if it is cupped lengthwise, but I would just glue and clamp it and line it up with a rubber mallet to knock it into place as you tighten the clamps. Run your finger across the joint to feel when it is flush; more accurate than doing it by sight.

But I've got a biscuit jointer, but no regular jointer. I'm left with table saw tight joints.

Which should be sufficient if you use a sharp rip blade and the edge against the fence is dead straight. A cleat of straight plywood could be screwed to the underside to ride against the fence.

Of course I have all of the equipment and would follow up with my mechanical jointer or hand held Stanley Bailey #7 or 8 jointer plane. If the joint is not tight, the biscuits would hold it together but you risk the same sort of seperation as the original problem. Plus the glue that "fills" irregularities will expand and contract with changes in humidity and telegraph through the finish.


(This post was edited by edge on Apr 29, 2011, 1:47 PM)


granite_grrl


Apr 29, 2011, 1:51 PM
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Re: [climber49er] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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climber49er wrote:
granite_grrl wrote:
Damn, no way to cheat? The table is pretty darn solid, I just want to make it look pretty.

Nope, if you try to glue it as is, you'll just make busy work for yourself.
And by doing it the right way I pretty much just make work for Chossy......which sounds better than it is considering I'm still waiting for a kitchen that he started 2 years ago.


Diphthong


Apr 29, 2011, 2:09 PM
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Heh, she said wood.


wjca


May 2, 2011, 9:28 AM
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edge wrote:
imnotclever wrote:
edge wrote:
imnotclever wrote:
Pop it off the base, clean up the edges on the tablesaw and then biscuit it back together.

Biscuits aren't necessary if you get a good, tight fit of wood to wood; the glue joint would then be stronger than the surrounding wood.

They might help you line the piece up if it is cupped lengthwise, but I would just glue and clamp it and line it up with a rubber mallet to knock it into place as you tighten the clamps. Run your finger across the joint to feel when it is flush; more accurate than doing it by sight.

But I've got a biscuit jointer, but no regular jointer. I'm left with table saw tight joints.

Which should be sufficient if you use a sharp rip blade and the edge against the fence is dead straight. A cleat of straight plywood could be screwed to the underside to ride against the fence.

Of course I have all of the equipment and would follow up with my mechanical jointer or hand held Stanley Bailey #7 or 8 jointer plane. If the joint is not tight, the biscuits would hold it together but you risk the same sort of seperation as the original problem. Plus the glue that "fills" irregularities will expand and contract with changes in humidity and telegraph through the finish.

It's also possible to joint the edge with a router and flush trim bit if you had a straight edge to run the router against. Wouldn't have to have a table saw.


edge


May 2, 2011, 9:30 AM
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Re: [wjca] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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Of course the easiest solution to the original problem is to use a tablecloth.


Diphthong


May 2, 2011, 9:34 AM
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edge wrote:
Of course the easiest solution to the original problem is to use a tablecloth.

Occam's wood planer.


jeepnphreak


May 2, 2011, 12:37 PM
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Re: [edge] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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edge wrote:
The only real way to fix it is to take the top off, run it through a table saw where the joint gets removed by the blade, and then regluing on the bare wood.

I wish I could tell you that there is an easier way, but there isn't.

+1

After trueing up the split and re-glueing, sand the table with a bit of 100 grt and after things are nice and even get some 350 grt and go over the joint well ad the rest of the table remember to get some tack cloth and get all the dust off the surface when it all smooth. after stain in your favorite shade the joint should be hard to see.


edge


May 2, 2011, 1:10 PM
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Diphthong wrote:
edge wrote:
Of course the easiest solution to the original problem is to use a tablecloth.

Occam's wood planer.

You can trim the tablecloth with a razor, but pinking shears will keep the edges from fraying.


Partner j_ung


May 12, 2011, 3:52 PM
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That doesn't sound gay at all.


chatreed


May 13, 2011, 1:52 AM
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Re: [j_ung] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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glue cannt make up the crack,I think


edge


May 13, 2011, 6:42 AM
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j_ung wrote:
That doesn't sound gay at all.


~*~ Fabulous! ~*~


jorgle


May 17, 2011, 2:38 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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sand, glue then use a pocket drill to tighten up everything.

J


granite_grrl


May 17, 2011, 3:11 PM
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Re: [jorgle] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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jorgle wrote:
sand, glue then use a pocket drill to tighten up everything.

J
I like your style dude, but I might have to go with Edge with this one.


Partner philbox
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May 23, 2011, 10:18 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] hey Edge! or anyone with woodworking experiance [In reply to]
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I have the perfect solution. Fill the joint with silicone and screw it together with a few roofing screws. The hex heads on those screws won't stick out of the top of the table that much. When finished do the table cloth thing as already suggested. Job done. Laugh


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