Forums: Climbing Information: Injury Treatment and Prevention:
Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty?
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Injury Treatment and Prevention

Premier Sponsor:

 


muddyv8


Jul 19, 2011, 1:33 AM
Post #1 of 7 (1394 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 6, 2011
Posts: 12

Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty?
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I've been climbing for about 4 months now and can now send most indoor/outdoor v4s within a handful of attempts. I know there is injury risk from stressing tendons too fast and too soon (via hangboards/campus boards, etc), but is there also the same risk from working problems?

I am not relying solely on my finger/forearm/tendon strength because these are problems and necessitate the proper footwork and technique that supplement strength. However, is there a similar amount of risk to a n00b hangboarding or campusing if I increase the difficulty (and therefore, finger/forearm/tendon strength required) of the problems that I try?

I am now trying to workout the sequences for v5s and v6s, but if I can only complete a few moves due to a lack of strength is this akin to flailing on the campus board? I know there must be some risk of injury, but I want to make sure it's nothing comparable to the risk posed if someone in my situation were to start campus boarding already.

I'm really competitive and want to try harder and harder problems, but obviously don't want to get injured.


dan2see


Jul 19, 2011, 5:56 AM
Post #2 of 7 (1357 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 28, 2006
Posts: 1497

Re: [muddyv8] Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

If those numbers (V5 and V6) really are you goals, if that's where you set your bar, then you should be able to manage a longer, slower, progress.

Or you could try climbing for the fun. The activity is a form of recreation. "Fun" changes your perspective, alters your goals, and makes life easier.

Uhh... what's that word "obviously" refer to?


superchuffer


Jul 19, 2011, 6:17 AM
Post #3 of 7 (1345 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 9, 2011
Posts: 294

Re: [muddyv8] Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

wear a beanie, it protects you from all injuries. and since you are competitive, yell 'you suck' at anyone on your proj bra!


camhead


Jul 19, 2011, 7:21 AM
Post #4 of 7 (1324 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 9, 2001
Posts: 20656

Re: [muddyv8] Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

muddyv8 wrote:
I am now trying to workout the sequences for v5s and v6s, but if I can only complete a few moves due to a lack of strength is this akin to flailing on the campus board? I know there must be some risk of injury, but I want to make sure it's nothing comparable to the risk posed if someone in my situation were to start campus boarding already.

You're asking if it is as easy to injure yourself on a gym problem as on a campus board?

It depends on the type of problem you are working, but yes. If the problem has a weird and/or tweaky pull with bad body positioning, you may be more likely to injure yourself. Often on problems, you'll have the mental motivation to send, and wind up doing something stupid and injuring yourself even more than on a campus board.

Pick your projects wisely, especially if you have shitty route setters. Climb static, climb with your feet, climb slopers, climb open-handed, blablabla. Consider doing more hangboard exercises than campus board stuff.


Partner cracklover


Jul 19, 2011, 9:58 AM
Post #5 of 7 (1293 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 14, 2002
Posts: 9935

Re: [muddyv8] Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

muddyv8 wrote:
I've been climbing for about 4 months now and can now send most indoor/outdoor v4s within a handful of attempts. I know there is injury risk from stressing tendons too fast and too soon (via hangboards/campus boards, etc), but is there also the same risk from working problems?

In roughly 14 years of climbing, I've blown finger pulleys twice. The first time was bouldering in the gym. So yes, it's possible.

GO


muddyv8


Jul 23, 2011, 2:12 AM
Post #6 of 7 (1216 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 6, 2011
Posts: 12

Re: [dan2see] Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Reaching a specific numerical grade is not my goal. My goal is to be able to do harder and harder problems. I want to push myself to be able to send the most difficult moves - this is fun for me. I enjoy problems that are easier for me, however, I find more pleasure in doing problems that I have to struggle to complete.

Working out the sequences to v5s and v6s is a means to improving my skill so that I can climb more difficulty problems.

I guess I meant to say that I'm competitive with myself and I enjoy pushing myself to continually improve.


muddyv8


Jul 23, 2011, 2:22 AM
Post #7 of 7 (1213 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 6, 2011
Posts: 12

Re: [camhead] Possibility of Injury Due to Increased Difficulty? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Ok, thanks for the advice.

I heard that generally, one should wait at least a year until starting to train with the campus board. Is there a suggested experience level or whatnot to reach before hangboarding? Do the tendons need as much time to strengthen for hanging?


Forums : Climbing Information : Injury Treatment and Prevention

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?
$134.99 (10% off)
$80.06 (10% off)
$49.46 (10% off)
$211.50 (10% off)



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook