Forums: Climbing Information: Beginners:
The Art of the Belay...
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Beginners

Premier Sponsor:

 
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


stoneguy


Aug 8, 2011, 5:40 PM
Post #1 of 47 (5054 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 7, 2011
Posts: 139

The Art of the Belay...
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (7 ratings)  
Can't Post

I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?


TheNags


Aug 8, 2011, 6:57 PM
Post #2 of 47 (5013 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 17, 2011
Posts: 53

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Personally (keep in mind I am new), I belay on an ATC. I find it is easier to pay out slack when clipping, and I just feel more in control than with a gri gri. I am assuming you are talking about lead belay, because a 5.12 climber probably doesn't wanna TR all day. I have only been climbing 3 months and am by far the weakest climber in my group. As long as you can catch a big fall softly, and you pay attention, I have found that most experience climbers are happy to have you belay them, and as a newbie it is a great way to learn technique (by seeing it performed right in front of you). hope that helps!


Player


Aug 8, 2011, 7:07 PM
Post #3 of 47 (5004 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 29, 2011
Posts: 56

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (3 ratings)  
Can't Post

A 5.9 belaying them? So now how difficult you climb affects your ability to belay? If your 5.9 belayer sucks, it's probably because you aren't telling them what they are doing wrong, and how to do it better.


kiwiprincess


Aug 8, 2011, 8:36 PM
Post #4 of 47 (4966 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2007
Posts: 307

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (4 ratings)  
Can't Post

Some bad climbers are good belayers and some good climbers are terrible belayers.

Awareness, reliability and pateience are the key traits to look for.

The perfect belayer is the one that gives you dynamic belay to clear the ugly bulge, Says ok when you want one more go at your project despite being at that hanging belay for an hour already, sees the dangers (grounfall, dodgy placements, leg behind rope) acknowledges them calmly.


hugepedro


Aug 8, 2011, 8:48 PM
Post #5 of 47 (4963 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 28, 2002
Posts: 2875

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?

T0, or possibly one of the dumbest posts I've ever seen on this site.


qwert


Aug 8, 2011, 11:47 PM
Post #6 of 47 (4924 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 24, 2004
Posts: 2394

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (7 ratings)  
Can't Post

stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?
I can't think of any forum post that would want a troll typing for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to be funny but the idea is also important.
So, pay attention, drink beer, fuck the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the poster is out of his mind.. usually we're on a CAPS LOCK. What do you want.. how can we be better? be original, bring in the fun after a post, maybe a "understandable post'"..?
What do you need...?

qwert


mc


Aug 8, 2011, 11:56 PM
Post #7 of 47 (4919 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 21, 2003
Posts: 13

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

There are people who have never climbed that I would trust to belay me after a short explanation. There are "experienced" climbers who make me nervous no matter how long they have climbed.

My first partner drank beer and and smoked bowls the whole time and I never doubt he would catch me if I fell. He always had gave or took slack as appropriate...


(This post was edited by mc on Aug 9, 2011, 12:07 AM)


Partner j_ung


Aug 9, 2011, 5:30 AM
Post #8 of 47 (4875 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 21, 2003
Posts: 18687

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?

Well, I disagree with your first premise that climbing ability has any bearing on belaying. But I agree with your major premise that belaying is an art, and that, while it's a fundamental safety skill, it isn't necessarily easy to do it well. Personally, I think there's are intangible qualities to good belayers that are difficult, if not impossible, to teach. An innate understanding of the seriousness of the task is one. Reaction time is another, and the ability to know which reaction is appropriate is yet another. Perhaps all of these come with experience. I dunno.

In no particular order, a truly good belayer...

1. Understands the seriousness of the task and pays attention
2. Knows what type of catch to administer and can do it spontaneously
3. Keeps an appropriate amount of slack or tension in the system
4. Is patient and obedient
5. Is utterly proficient with his or her chosen device
6. Communicates with the climber to the extent possible


stoneguy


Aug 9, 2011, 5:55 AM
Post #9 of 47 (4867 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 7, 2011
Posts: 139

Re: [j_ung] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Sounds fair & clear. I have heard/read many complain about the risk on a difficult climb. What exactly are the different types of catches ? Obviously an overhang/invert wall hurts a lot less, but any hints on how to better protect our lead when you can't see them, which usually means they would hit a ledge or outcrop.


stoneguy


Aug 9, 2011, 7:29 AM
Post #10 of 47 (4834 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 7, 2011
Posts: 139

Re: [TheNags] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Thanks and yes. My partner rarely complains about my belay unless I fail to pay out fast enough occasionally, but that's usually with height. Still, I feel there would be ways to improve. Yes, I try to be focused and attentive. Climbing 4 months & started seconding a month ago.


Partner j_ung


Aug 9, 2011, 7:37 AM
Post #11 of 47 (4822 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 21, 2003
Posts: 18687

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

stoneguy wrote:
Sounds fair & clear. I have heard/read many complain about the risk on a difficult climb. What exactly are the different types of catches ? Obviously an overhang/invert wall hurts a lot less, but any hints on how to better protect our lead when you can't see them, which usually means they would hit a ledge or outcrop.

If communication isn't possible, I keep a default amount of slack in the system and catch whatever fall occurs. With no visual or auditory feedback, that's about all you can do. The good news is, if you can't communicate, at least they aren't likely to hit the ground.


MS1


Aug 9, 2011, 8:00 AM
Post #12 of 47 (4806 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 24, 2009
Posts: 560

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

stoneguy wrote:
Thanks and yes. My partner rarely complains about my belay unless I fail to pay out fast enough occasionally, but that's usually with height. Still, I feel there would be ways to improve. Yes, I try to be focused and attentive. Climbing 4 months & started seconding a month ago.

Sounds like you need to practice feeding out slack so that you can do it quickly enough. No matter how tall your partner is, you should always be able to whip out enough rope for him to make his clips. If you regularly short-rope your leader, pretty soon that will be the end of that climbing partnership.


granite_grrl


Aug 9, 2011, 8:58 AM
Post #13 of 47 (4774 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2002
Posts: 14800

Re: [j_ung] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

j_ung wrote:
stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?

Well, I disagree with your first premise that climbing ability has any bearing on belaying. But I agree with your major premise that belaying is an art, and that, while it's a fundamental safety skill, it isn't necessarily easy to do it well. Personally, I think there's are intangible qualities to good belayers that are difficult, if not impossible, to teach. An innate understanding of the seriousness of the task is one. Reaction time is another, and the ability to know which reaction is appropriate is yet another. Perhaps all of these come with experience. I dunno.

In no particular order, a truly good belayer...

1. Understands the seriousness of the task and pays attention
2. Knows what type of catch to administer and can do it spontaneously
3. Keeps an appropriate amount of slack or tension in the system
4. Is patient and obedient
5. Is utterly proficient with his or her chosen device
6. Communicates with the climber to the extent possible
I think that your list is the bare minimum that I would expect from a belayer. If I'm on a sport route that's really pushing my limits I want a belayer who can do all those things, but are good enough at rope management that it doesn't even feel like they're at the other end of the rope.

Even better than that is a belayer that knows me well enough and gives me useful prompts and encouragement while I'm climbing. I'm lucky because my main climbing partner knows me better than anyone I know (my hubby), he also gives me the dreamiest soft catches out of anyone I know. Not that my other partners are giving hard catches, but they don't have the pillow like quality of the catches from my husband.


hugepedro


Aug 9, 2011, 9:33 AM
Post #14 of 47 (4751 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 28, 2002
Posts: 2875

Re: [j_ung] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

j_ung wrote:
stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?

Well, I disagree with your first premise that climbing ability has any bearing on belaying. But I agree with your major premise that belaying is an art, and that, while it's a fundamental safety skill, it isn't necessarily easy to do it well. Personally, I think there's are intangible qualities to good belayers that are difficult, if not impossible, to teach. An innate understanding of the seriousness of the task is one. Reaction time is another, and the ability to know which reaction is appropriate is yet another. Perhaps all of these come with experience. I dunno.

In no particular order, a truly good belayer...

1. Understands the seriousness of the task and pays attention
2. Knows what type of catch to administer and can do it spontaneously
3. Keeps an appropriate amount of slack or tension in the system
4. Is patient and obedient
5. Is utterly proficient with his or her chosen device
6. Communicates with the climber to the extent possible

7. Is competent with self-rescue techniques
8. Doesn't just assume that I know what I'm doing and have considered and prepared for all aspects of the route, uses their own judgement to analyze the situation and make suggestions
9. Makes sure they understand the plan before I leave the deck


Mariofercol


Aug 9, 2011, 9:56 AM
Post #15 of 47 (4739 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 16, 2008
Posts: 103

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

I belay 5.13s in a good day Sly


bearbreeder


Aug 9, 2011, 10:11 AM
Post #16 of 47 (4724 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 1, 2009
Posts: 1960

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

catches me when i fall

keeps me tight over a ledge

gets ready to jump when the fall is clean

doesnt short rope me ... but note that id rather be short roped than have someone have too much slack in the system over a ledge or off the ground, which is hard to tell when he cant see you on a long multi ... belaying or easier lower angle terrain IMO is much more demanding than higher angle "harder" climbs

knows what to do if i eff up and get injured

and knows what to do on multi

thats about it .. there are other things ... but those are the big ones

oh and being a hawt chick helps Wink


JoeHamilton


Aug 9, 2011, 10:32 AM
Post #17 of 47 (4715 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 15, 2011
Posts: 812

Re: [bearbreeder] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

I don't have as much experience as a lot of you. But, just f-ing catch me if I fall.


JoeHamilton


Aug 9, 2011, 10:33 AM
Post #18 of 47 (4713 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 15, 2011
Posts: 812

Re: [JoeHamilton] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Oh and teach me the rest, so I can offer you what's best for you.


Partner happiegrrrl


Aug 9, 2011, 4:33 PM
Post #19 of 47 (4653 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 25, 2004
Posts: 4615

Re: [j_ung] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

j_ung wrote:
In no particular order, a truly good belayer...

1. Understands the seriousness of the task and pays attention
2. Knows what type of catch to administer and can do it spontaneously
3. Keeps an appropriate amount of slack or tension in the system
4. Is patient and obedient
5. Is utterly proficient with his or her chosen device
6. Communicates with the climber to the extent possible

add "Is ready to climb when the leader calls "On belay" when doing multipitch(although I suppose that is more of a "art of seconding" quality.

I'm not sure I would choose "obedient" as a term though. A good belayer has their partner's back, and maybe there are times not to be so submissive(thinking of a time I had a leader who was sketching out and wanting to "go" instead of putting in a piece; which would be the last he could get for several feet, and he was just passing the zone of 'fall and probably be okay' into 'fall and you will probably get hurt' and I refused slack until he placed.


The infamous drkodos once said(or yelled, actually) "The belayer's job is to catch the fall. Anything more is a perk!" Then "get off the rope! Get off the rope or I'm lowerin' ya to the ground!!!111!"


dagibbs


Aug 9, 2011, 6:51 PM
Post #20 of 47 (4612 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 30, 2007
Posts: 887

Re: [happiegrrrl] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

happiegrrrl wrote:

add "Is ready to climb when the leader calls "On belay" when doing multipitch(although I suppose that is more of a "art of seconding" quality.

Really? Nope. As a general rule, I'm not taking down my anchor until I'm on belay.


dan2see


Aug 9, 2011, 7:58 PM
Post #21 of 47 (4587 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 28, 2006
Posts: 1497

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

On sport climbs with groups, generally all the guys are good. But sometimes a guy is chatting the girls, or telling his stories, or watching the birds across the river.

It's great to have standards of behaviour and rules of conduct, but frankly my feeling is, while I'm watching my belayer, I'm not climbing. And climbers come from anywhere.

So I try to just focus on the climb. I ask one thing only: that my belayer always has one hand on the tail of the belay.

Beyond that, if I really don't like what's going on down there, I'll find a different guy to belay me.


villageidiot


Aug 9, 2011, 9:21 PM
Post #22 of 47 (4538 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 11, 2005
Posts: 104

Re: [stoneguy] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

When projecting a good belayer:

Never short ropes

Allows the climber to fall enough such that he does not swing hard into the wall, but not enough that getting back on route requires a lot of work

Can lock off and hold a climber exactly where he or she wants to be

Can both lower the climber and help him move up on a route

Knows how to boink

Can actually boink

Keeps the rope under enough tension to keep large loops of slack from forming between bolts and getting in the way

If heavier than the climber, knows when to jump to soften the fall

Has useful beta, or knows when not to say anything

Can keep an eye on the climbers stuff, kid, dog, the weather, and make sure Bob Scarpelli is not approaching

Is still up for belaying one last burn is tired, sore, bored, pissed off, or otherwise ready to call it a day


Partner j_ung


Aug 10, 2011, 4:34 AM
Post #23 of 47 (4482 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 21, 2003
Posts: 18687

Re: [hugepedro] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

hugepedro wrote:
j_ung wrote:
stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?

Well, I disagree with your first premise that climbing ability has any bearing on belaying. But I agree with your major premise that belaying is an art, and that, while it's a fundamental safety skill, it isn't necessarily easy to do it well. Personally, I think there's are intangible qualities to good belayers that are difficult, if not impossible, to teach. An innate understanding of the seriousness of the task is one. Reaction time is another, and the ability to know which reaction is appropriate is yet another. Perhaps all of these come with experience. I dunno.

In no particular order, a truly good belayer...

1. Understands the seriousness of the task and pays attention
2. Knows what type of catch to administer and can do it spontaneously
3. Keeps an appropriate amount of slack or tension in the system
4. Is patient and obedient
5. Is utterly proficient with his or her chosen device
6. Communicates with the climber to the extent possible

7. Is competent with self-rescue techniques
8. Doesn't just assume that I know what I'm doing and have considered and prepared for all aspects of the route, uses their own judgement to analyze the situation and make suggestions
9. Makes sure they understand the plan before I leave the deck

Your 8 and 9 are covered in my list, I think. I tried to keep it pretty general. Good number 7.


Partner j_ung


Aug 10, 2011, 4:36 AM
Post #24 of 47 (4481 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 21, 2003
Posts: 18687

Re: [granite_grrl] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

granite_grrl wrote:
j_ung wrote:
stoneguy wrote:
I can't think of any 5.12 climbers that would want a 5.9 belaying for them. So what are we missing. Yes, everyone wants to go "up" but the Belay is also important.
So, pay attention, don't drink beer, don't talk to the tourists.... What exactly do you expect? Part of the time the climber is out of sight.. usually we're on a GriGri. What do you want.. how can we be better? Pay out the rope on time, bring in the slack after a clip, maybe a "soft catch"..?
What do you need...?

Well, I disagree with your first premise that climbing ability has any bearing on belaying. But I agree with your major premise that belaying is an art, and that, while it's a fundamental safety skill, it isn't necessarily easy to do it well. Personally, I think there's are intangible qualities to good belayers that are difficult, if not impossible, to teach. An innate understanding of the seriousness of the task is one. Reaction time is another, and the ability to know which reaction is appropriate is yet another. Perhaps all of these come with experience. I dunno.

In no particular order, a truly good belayer...

1. Understands the seriousness of the task and pays attention
2. Knows what type of catch to administer and can do it spontaneously
3. Keeps an appropriate amount of slack or tension in the system
4. Is patient and obedient
5. Is utterly proficient with his or her chosen device
6. Communicates with the climber to the extent possible
I think that your list is the bare minimum that I would expect from a belayer. If I'm on a sport route that's really pushing my limits I want a belayer who can do all those things, but are good enough at rope management that it doesn't even feel like they're at the other end of the rope.

Even better than that is a belayer that knows me well enough and gives me useful prompts and encouragement while I'm climbing. I'm lucky because my main climbing partner knows me better than anyone I know (my hubby), he also gives me the dreamiest soft catches out of anyone I know. Not that my other partners are giving hard catches, but they don't have the pillow like quality of the catches from my husband.

I think those are covered in my numbers 3 and 6, but yeah, the specifics sure help, IMO.


Partner j_ung


Aug 10, 2011, 4:42 AM
Post #25 of 47 (4476 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 21, 2003
Posts: 18687

Re: [happiegrrrl] The Art of the Belay... [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

happiegrrrl wrote:
I'm not sure I would choose "obedient" as a term though. A good belayer has their partner's back, and maybe there are times not to be so submissive(thinking of a time I had a leader who was sketching out and wanting to "go" instead of putting in a piece; which would be the last he could get for several feet, and he was just passing the zone of 'fall and probably be okay' into 'fall and you will probably get hurt' and I refused slack until he placed.

The infamous drkodos once said(or yelled, actually) "The belayer's job is to catch the fall. Anything more is a perk!" Then "get off the rope! Get off the rope or I'm lowerin' ya to the ground!!!111!"

If you refused me slack, I'd carpet F bomb you. BUT, I suppose I can imagine doing that in one or two situations, such as when climbing with an inexperienced leader who obviously didn't realize what he or she was about to do. Actually, even then, I don't think I'd refuse slack. I'd advise and then continue the belay.

RD is a whole other ball of wax. It's almost as though some of the norms of climbing don't apply to him... and somehow it all works really well. The few times I climbed with him, I was certainly never tentative about going above my gear. He's a top notch partner.

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Forums : Climbing Information : Beginners

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook