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What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall
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bearbreeder


Oct 24, 2011, 11:01 PM
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What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall
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http://vimeo.com/29334252

In 2002, Craig DeMartino's life should have ended. Craig took a 100-foot ground fall after a miscommunication with his climbing partner. The accident left Craig in a wheelchair and a slew of medical problems. Thankful to be alive, Craig still struggled to redefine himself after the accident. His lifestyle had changed forever. He struggled to play with his kids. The outdoors were no longer a part of his life. After being diagnosed with a neurological condition, Craig reached a turning point. He could amputate his slow-healing foot to stem his nerve condition and gamble that he could get his life back or he could stick with the obvious outcome -- stay in a wheelchair and grapple with pain for the rest of his life..


(This post was edited by bearbreeder on Oct 24, 2011, 11:02 PM)


shockabuku


Oct 25, 2011, 9:31 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall [In reply to]
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I had the pleasure of meeting Craig and climbing around him for a couple of years. He's a great guy with a really positive attitude. He's definitely not the guy you think of as disabled.


potreroed


Oct 25, 2011, 10:23 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall [In reply to]
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I know a guy who was soloing, fell 145 feet to the ground, landed on two big packs he had there, staggered down to the bottom of the canyon to find an off-duty ambulance waiting. No broken bones, no internal injuries but he had multiple lacerations and was still digging small tree branches out of his neck a year later.

A couple of years later he fell 60 feet (again soloing 5.12, broken holds) and broke both ankles.


bearbreeder


Oct 25, 2011, 8:55 PM
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Re: [shockabuku] What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall [In reply to]
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shockabuku wrote:
I had the pleasure of meeting Craig and climbing around him for a couple of years. He's a great guy with a really positive attitude. He's definitely not the guy you think of as disabled.

thanks for posting yr experience with him ...

i cant imagine having to make that decision ... to amputate or stay wheelchair bound ...

i once saw a girl with an artificial leg lead a hand crack on gear ... its amazing what you can do when you have the will ...


notapplicable


Oct 25, 2011, 10:20 PM
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Re: [bearbreeder] What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall [In reply to]
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bearbreeder wrote:
http://vimeo.com/29334252

In 2002, Craig DeMartino's life should have ended. Craig took a 100-foot ground fall after a miscommunication with his climbing partner. The accident left Craig in a wheelchair and a slew of medical problems. Thankful to be alive, Craig still struggled to redefine himself after the accident. His lifestyle had changed forever. He struggled to play with his kids. The outdoors were no longer a part of his life. After being diagnosed with a neurological condition, Craig reached a turning point. He could amputate his slow-healing foot to stem his nerve condition and gamble that he could get his life back or he could stick with the obvious outcome -- stay in a wheelchair and grapple with pain for the rest of his life..

Wow. It's amazing what some people can survive and overcome.


shockabuku


Oct 26, 2011, 8:10 AM
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Re: [bearbreeder] What Itís Like to Survive a 100-Foot Climbing Fall [In reply to]
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bearbreeder wrote:
shockabuku wrote:
I had the pleasure of meeting Craig and climbing around him for a couple of years. He's a great guy with a really positive attitude. He's definitely not the guy you think of as disabled.

thanks for posting yr experience with him ...

i cant imagine having to make that decision ... to amputate or stay wheelchair bound ...

i once saw a girl with an artificial leg lead a hand crack on gear ... its amazing what you can do when you have the will ...


You know what's still amazing to me is that Craig's injury was as bad as it really was. I would never have guessed at the extent of the injury or amount of discomfort it causes him based on what I saw him do.


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