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Poll: Gender-preferential treatment?
Women definitely get preferential treatment/easier time/more breaks in life than men do, because of their gender 5 / 18%
Women get discriminated against and overall have harder life than men. 11 / 39%
50/50, both genders get positive and negative breaks about equally. 12 / 43%
28 total votes
 

lena_chita
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Dec 26, 2011, 8:23 PM
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Gender-preferential treatment?
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A certain guy and I are having this continuous discussion. He thinks that women get a lot of perks and breaks in life, because they are women, way more than men do.

Examples:

1) He gets a new washer delivered. The delivery guys bring the washer into the basement, take the old one, and leave. He has to install the washer (which isn't a big deal, just connecting a couple of hoses, but that's not the point).
I am surprised to hear this, because when I had a washer purchased from the same store within the past year, the delivery included installation at no extra charge.
His response: that's because you are a woman. The guys would just do it for you, and you don't even have to ask. REALLY?

2) a hotel room is missing a hair dryer, and I would like an extra pillow. I walk up to the service desk, get a smile, and apology, and walk away with a hair dryer and a pillow.
His response: that's because you are a woman. If I went in there asking for a hair dryer and an extra pillow, they would have called me fag and told me to get lost. REALLY?


So, is it true that I am walking through life completely oblivious to my privileged position as "fair sex", while seeing more dramatic effects of gender discrimination in pay, glass ceiling, etc. etc. as outweighing the "perks" of delivery guys installing driers and hotel clerks rushing to get me a pillow?

Of course, everyone encounters both positive and negative things, and maybe attributes some of them to their gender.

But OVERALL, if you had to make an estimation, would you say that women have it easier than men, the opposite, or both get about the same?


Urban_Cowboy


Dec 26, 2011, 9:30 PM
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Re: [lena_chita] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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I'd agree with the two examples you gave. But you should ask him who gets the better "deal" when it involves a vehicle; especially if you're taking it to get fixed. Guys by default don't get raked over the coals as much as women do when it comes to that...even if both sexes have the same knowledge on the subject.

Definitely matters what subject is involved. I'd say it's 50/50.


notapplicable


Dec 26, 2011, 10:08 PM
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While women do get preferential treatment in some regards (bigger tips, upgrades, offers to fix or help with stuff, doors held, etc...) I think the balance is still in the mans favor on most "big picture" issues. One look at the fields of business and politics reveals an unsettling level of inequality between the sexes that no amount of door holding or travel perks/upgrades can make up for. It's not even close IMO.


damienclimber


Dec 27, 2011, 3:38 AM
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lena_chita wrote:
A certain guy and I are having this continuous discussion. He thinks that women get a lot of perks and breaks in life, because they are women, way more than men do.

Examples:

1) He gets a new washer delivered. The delivery guys bring the washer into the basement, take the old one, and leave. He has to install the washer (which isn't a big deal, just connecting a couple of hoses, but that's not the point).
I am surprised to hear this, because when I had a washer purchased from the same store within the past year, the delivery included installation at no extra charge.
His response: that's because you are a woman. The guys would just do it for you, and you don't even have to ask. REALLY?

2) a hotel room is missing a hair dryer, and I would like an extra pillow. I walk up to the service desk, get a smile, and apology, and walk away with a hair dryer and a pillow.
His response: that's because you are a woman. If I went in there asking for a hair dryer and an extra pillow, they would have called me fag and told me to get lost. REALLY?


So, is it true that I am walking through life completely oblivious to my privileged position as "fair sex", while seeing more dramatic effects of gender discrimination in pay, glass ceiling, etc. etc. as outweighing the "perks" of delivery guys installing driers and hotel clerks rushing to get me a pillow?

Of course, everyone encounters both positive and negative things, and maybe attributes some of them to their gender.

But OVERALL, if you had to make an estimation, would you say that women have it easier than men, the opposite, or both get about the same?


I believe all people should be treated equally no matter what their sex, race, religion or what foreign country they come from.


I also believe there should be no affirmative action since that says people aren't treated fairly.

If you want to be a doctor it should be based on objective tests, experience, and its not fair if a white man has to pay and have 500,000 in loans while a black women has none.
It stood be determined on need only.

That being said I believe there is a glass ceiling in most business careers for women.
Especially when you get to top executive levels , CEO and on boards.

Of course there has never been a women president in the U.S, either

Women in some boys club business do have to prove themselves more and often have to more pressure to be exceptional versus a lower level expected of men in the same industry.


chadnsc


Dec 27, 2011, 11:50 AM
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Re: [lena_chita] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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I think both genders get preferential treatment depending on the situation.

One thing I have noticed is that in my profession of architecture / engineering has been dominated by white men in the past. Without a doubt their was gender and race discrimination in my profession and I find that disgusting and unacceptable.

To make up for these past practices many firms now have unofficial polices to create a diverse workplace. Why unofficial you ask, because it's illegal to show preference to someone based on gender or ethnic background but firms still prefer to hire women and minorities.

In the past nine years I worked for my last firm we hired five new designers. Four of them where women and one of them was a man and native american.


Another example: I'm friends with a guy who manages 20 employees at a large architectural firm; 15 white males, four women, and one minority. My friend the manager had his year end bonus reduced for 'not having a diverse enough workplace' (this was stated on his bonus in a line item) The firm has no hiring policy based on diversity as it's illegal to do so.


climbs4fun
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Dec 27, 2011, 7:00 PM
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Re: [lena_chita] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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lena_chita wrote:
A certain guy and I are having this continuous discussion. He thinks that women get a lot of perks and breaks in life, because they are women, way more than men do.

Examples:

1) He gets a new washer delivered. The delivery guys bring the washer into the basement, take the old one, and leave. He has to install the washer (which isn't a big deal, just connecting a couple of hoses, but that's not the point).
I am surprised to hear this, because when I had a washer purchased from the same store within the past year, the delivery included installation at no extra charge.
His response: that's because you are a woman. The guys would just do it for you, and you don't even have to ask. REALLY?

2) a hotel room is missing a hair dryer, and I would like an extra pillow. I walk up to the service desk, get a smile, and apology, and walk away with a hair dryer and a pillow.
His response: that's because you are a woman. If I went in there asking for a hair dryer and an extra pillow, they would have called me fag and told me to get lost. REALLY?


So, is it true that I am walking through life completely oblivious to my privileged position as "fair sex", while seeing more dramatic effects of gender discrimination in pay, glass ceiling, etc. etc. as outweighing the "perks" of delivery guys installing driers and hotel clerks rushing to get me a pillow?

Of course, everyone encounters both positive and negative things, and maybe attributes some of them to their gender.

But OVERALL, if you had to make an estimation, would you say that women have it easier than men, the opposite, or both get about the same?

number 1 is true. #2, if you were currently anywhere else in the country other than where you are right this moment, I would also agree. But you aren't. he would have gotten the same treatment you did in this case.

Don't get him started on the ladies nights and drinks specials while you are here. You will not pay a cover charge to get into clubs, but he will. Cool


jt512


Dec 27, 2011, 7:40 PM
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Re: [climbs4fun] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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In substantive matters, women are discriminated against more than men. Whether it follows that women "overall have harder life lives than men" is unclear.

Jay


granite_grrl


Dec 28, 2011, 8:00 AM
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Re: [lena_chita] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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My POV working as a female elctrical engineer in a world of men.

My career has been within industry, either as a plant engineer or being a vender designing and bringing new equpment into a plant. This is very male dominated. There aren't that many female electrical engineers and even fewer who work on the floor in industrial plants.

I won't lie, I get treated differently on site. The trades people are a little more interested in helping me out, I have also been brought chairs and tables (or items to be used as such) instead of having to stand at a panel and work on my laptop. These things are great and I do think that being a female has had a lot to do with it.

On the flip side I have felt it really hard to fit in in some situation. Most notably was at one of my last jobs. I don't play hockey, I don't play golf, the guys just seemed to want to hang out with the guys. I feel this hurt me with integration in the company which I'm sure helped their decision in who to lay off when buisness slowed down.

My sister is a chemical engineer who was working in consulting. She was laid off not long before I was from the previously mentioned position. She was laid off because she was the wrong "fit" for the company. We talked a lot about this fit for both her and I and questions about being female instead of male weighed heavily in our discussion.

Another thing discussed was how we were both at prime child bearing age. Not that either of us wanted childern, but I'm sure companies aren't thrilled about the idea of investing in someone who will take at least a year off if they have a kid, if they choose to come back to work at all.

Now this is not to say that our gender was the reason we were both laid off, but I think our feeling like outsiders in the workplace sure did and that quickly leads us not being the right "fit". I for one would trade these little perks if it meant that it wasn't so hard to integrate into a male dominated work force.


donald949


Dec 28, 2011, 1:15 PM
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Good to get another perspective of a plant engineer. Where I work, we are a rather large company, without the up and down cycles. I have worked with, and for, female engineers that enjoy being in the field, and they are deffinately valued by the company. They are still rather rare. Recently we are getting more females through the trades and desk engineering, but the field engineers remain slow to cycle in. Why, I don't know.
But you got to get the guys talking about climbing along with the football. I'm sure they would dig hearing about some of your climbing adventures.
But to answer Lena's question, partly. It is situational dependent, but there is gender preferential treatment sometimes your on the top and sometimes not. I think there are still a lot of old boy clubs out there that will be hard to get into. But I would recomend putting yourself somewhere your skills are valued. They are out there. Not that it is easy to figure out and find.


petsfed


Dec 28, 2011, 5:50 PM
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Re: [damienclimber] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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damienclimber wrote:
I also believe there should be no affirmative action since that says people aren't treated fairly.

If you want to be a doctor it should be based on objective tests, experience, and its not fair if a white man has to pay and have 500,000 in loans while a black women has none.
It stood be determined on need only.

Because previous conditions (e.g., ability to afford MCAT tutoring) that clearly influence entrance to medical school are uniform, and the only source of racial or gender inhomogeneity in any field is due to innate characteristics of the race/gender in question.

As a college student, I used to be very upset about affirmative action and how it was screwing me out of a scholarship, but honestly, over the 18 years before I went to college, my family's annual income was more than double those groups for which these programs exist to help. That means that in terms of aggregate income, it took 5 years for that wage gap to pay for my entire VERY ELONGATED college career. That is to say, the wage gap over 5 years was more than the cost of attendance for the 8 years it took me to get a bachelor's degree.

At the employment end, it is absolutely illegal to hire or fire based on race, creed, gender, etc; as it should be. But education is an opportunity and a commodity, and it should not be the case that people must resign themselves to a lower quality education, or miss out on certain job opportunities because of socioeconomic position. An upper-middle-class white male can get into the very best schools much easier than a lower-class black kid of any gender, not because the best schools are racist, but because schools in affluent areas are better, attract better teachers, have better supplies, and because the parents are much more able to provide additional resources, tutoring, prep-courses, etc.

Make no mistake, getting into medical school (for instance) is HARD WORK. Its just that somebody who can afford all of those aids without breaking a sweat will have an easier time of meeting the entrance criteria than somebody who can't afford them.


Partner rrrADAM


Dec 29, 2011, 4:44 PM
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I'd say 50/50, as you get perks in some areas, but discriminated aginst in others...

Even a remotely semi-attractive chick in many bars or clubs may not have to buy a single drink all night, where even the most attractive men have to buy their own.

But, many women still get dirsciminated aginst in certain fields of work... Not all, but still, any is too many. And that's just here in the US... Many other countries are far worse, and even some regions in the US are worse than others.


For what it's worth... The groups at my work (nuclear plant) that have women in them: e.g., service, technical, engineering, operations, financial, human resources, have women at all levels, up to and including executive level management, who perform just as well as the men, and are paid and treated the same... But then again, I work for a VERY large publically held utility, that adheres to its code of ethics policies.


(This post was edited by rrrADAM on Dec 29, 2011, 4:53 PM)


jt512


Dec 29, 2011, 5:12 PM
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http://skepchick.org/...es-me-hate-atheists/


lena_chita
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Dec 29, 2011, 7:11 PM
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That's a pretty good way to illustrate how I feel about the issue!

Yes, I am not stupid, I do realize that women of certain age and attractiveness get "perks" such as guys buying them beer at the bar or getting free entrance to the strip clubs.

But weighing "a guy holding a door open for me" (which, btw, I always do for someone who happens to be entering the building right after me, regardless of their gender.) vs. "a guy doesn't think twice about stopping at a random unfamiliar gas station after dark, but women usually have to pay more attention to things like that" seems like a no-brainer. The "perk" of an open door or a free beer is small and insignificant compared to safety issues, in terms of affecting the overall average quality of life.

And as far as discrimination in a professional world, how about this scenario:

In my lab, the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2. The count for bachelor- or associate-level technicians goes Males 1/females 6. And if you look at professor level... oi! I think you can use fingers on one hand to cover all female PIs in 5 large departments. And I've seen it pretty much everywhere in science.


Partner rrrADAM


Dec 30, 2011, 1:11 PM
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lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?


lena_chita
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Dec 30, 2011, 8:15 PM
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rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?

I do not know the exact answer to this question, and do not know where to look it up. But limited personal experience makes me fairly certain that it is skewed towards more males, though not quite 7:2, maybe something like 5:3.

But than again, I am looking at new graduate students for the gut feeling of 5:3, and when I am looking at actual working MD/PhDs, I am looking at people who got their MD/PhDs 10-25 years ago. I think it is changing towards more equal spread, in terms of new students just entering the field.


jt512


Dec 30, 2011, 9:20 PM
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lena_chita wrote:
rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?

I do not know the exact answer to this question, and do not know where to look it up. But limited personal experience makes me fairly certain that it is skewed towards more males, though not quite 7:2, maybe something like 5:3.

But than again, I am looking at new graduate students for the gut feeling of 5:3, and when I am looking at actual working MD/PhDs, I am looking at people who got their MD/PhDs 10-25 years ago. I think it is changing towards more equal spread, in terms of new students just entering the field.

It is well established that the higher in academic science you go, the smaller the proportion of females. There have been at least a couple of serious studies into why this is the case. I don't have references handy, but they're out there. If you are unable to find them, let me know. I might be able to ask around and dig them up.

Jay


granite_grrl


Dec 31, 2011, 2:58 AM
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Re: [jt512] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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jt512 wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?

I do not know the exact answer to this question, and do not know where to look it up. But limited personal experience makes me fairly certain that it is skewed towards more males, though not quite 7:2, maybe something like 5:3.

But than again, I am looking at new graduate students for the gut feeling of 5:3, and when I am looking at actual working MD/PhDs, I am looking at people who got their MD/PhDs 10-25 years ago. I think it is changing towards more equal spread, in terms of new students just entering the field.

It is well established that the higher in academic science you go, the smaller the proportion of females. There have been at least a couple of serious studies into why this is the case. I don't have references handy, but they're out there. If you are unable to find them, let me know. I might be able to ask around and dig them up.

Jay
In all fields? Curious.


Partner rrrADAM


Dec 31, 2011, 8:25 AM
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lena_chita wrote:
rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?

I do not know the exact answer to this question, and do not know where to look it up. But limited personal experience makes me fairly certain that it is skewed towards more males, though not quite 7:2, maybe something like 5:3.

But than again, I am looking at new graduate students for the gut feeling of 5:3, and when I am looking at actual working MD/PhDs, I am looking at people who got their MD/PhDs 10-25 years ago. I think it is changing towards more equal spread, in terms of new students just entering the field.

Then, as I'm sure you are well aware, given your own estimates and timelines, it sounds as if the numbers you see in your lab roughly represent the talent pool. If there were more females in the higher levels than the talent pool had to offer for people who got their advanced degrees a while ago, then it would show gender-preferential treatment in favor of females.

No?


Also, of those numbers you estimate... Roughly how many have chosen to be full time moms later on, thus removing themselves from the talent pool? My sister-in-law has an advanced degree in biology, and worked in a lab in academia, got paid little, switched to a pharmecutical company, made lots of $$$, but gave it up 2 years ago to raise her twins.


(This post was edited by rrrADAM on Dec 31, 2011, 8:29 AM)


jt512


Dec 31, 2011, 8:45 AM
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granite_grrl wrote:
jt512 wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?

I do not know the exact answer to this question, and do not know where to look it up. But limited personal experience makes me fairly certain that it is skewed towards more males, though not quite 7:2, maybe something like 5:3.

But than again, I am looking at new graduate students for the gut feeling of 5:3, and when I am looking at actual working MD/PhDs, I am looking at people who got their MD/PhDs 10-25 years ago. I think it is changing towards more equal spread, in terms of new students just entering the field.

It is well established that the higher in academic science you go, the smaller the proportion of females. There have been at least a couple of serious studies into why this is the case. I don't have references handy, but they're out there. If you are unable to find them, let me know. I might be able to ask around and dig them up.

Jay
In all fields? Curious.

I don't know about all fields, but it's the general trend across many fields. There's a book Why So Slow? The Advancement of Women by Virginia Valian. I have it at home, but haven't read it. Chapter 11 is on gender differences in academia, and the end notes contain several citations pertaining to the sciences.

Jay


lena_chita
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Dec 31, 2011, 9:31 AM
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rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
rrrADAM wrote:
lena_chita wrote:
...the count for MD/PhD level scientists goes Males 7/females 2...


What are the percentages, according to gender, who get MD/PhD level degrees in your field?

I do not know the exact answer to this question, and do not know where to look it up. But limited personal experience makes me fairly certain that it is skewed towards more males, though not quite 7:2, maybe something like 5:3.

But than again, I am looking at new graduate students for the gut feeling of 5:3, and when I am looking at actual working MD/PhDs, I am looking at people who got their MD/PhDs 10-25 years ago. I think it is changing towards more equal spread, in terms of new students just entering the field.

Then, as I'm sure you are well aware, given your own estimates and timelines, it sounds as if the numbers you see in your lab roughly represent the talent pool. If there were more females in the higher levels than the talent pool had to offer for people who got their advanced degrees a while ago, then it would show gender-preferential treatment in favor of females.

No?


Also, of those numbers you estimate... Roughly how many have chosen to be full time moms later on, thus removing themselves from the talent pool? My sister-in-law has an advanced degree in biology, and worked in a lab in academia, got paid little, switched to a pharmecutical company, made lots of $$$, but gave it up 2 years ago to raise her twins.

Some women do this-- the bolded part. A lot more continue to work, but choose to work reduced hours.

But that's the whole point. The system is set up in such a way that you have to put in a lot more than 40 hours (unpaid overtime, of course, because you are on a salary, not an hourly wage) if you want to advance in an academic career. And that is hard to do if you want to have kids and actually spend some waking time with them.

Women are faced with career vs. kids choice. Men usually aren't, or at least not to the extent that women are.
While there are certain situations where it makes more sense for the guy to reduce his working hours or stay at home completely to take care of the kids, and I know some men who do this, in most cases the male of the family earns more than the female, and that affects the decision of who stays home or reduces the hours.

Our University is only now (in the past year) introducing things such as emergency sick child care and overnight child care for work-related out-of-town trips. But even so, unless I absolutely cannot miss an important meeting, I am going to opt to stay home with a sick child instead of leaving her with a random stranger...


petsfed


Dec 31, 2011, 11:35 AM
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My girlfriend sent me an article a while back that observed that amongst female academics of all stripes, child-rearing occurred almost uniformly after tenure, whereas amongst men, that tended to only occur if their spouse was also an academic.

By the way, Adam, I've noticed that women in technical fields (I'm a TA for Engineering Physics I & II, so if a field needs physics in any way, I interact with freshman in that field) are terribly rare. Whatever it is that causes it is much earlier even than college. This is strange, to me, because the ratio is only like 3:1 amongst our grad students, while its about 10:1 over all undergrads in engineering, as well as physics, astronomy, chemistry, geology, and a few others. The advance lab I TA for (junior level physics lab) had no women in it last semester.

I, for one, think that the social pressures that keep women out of technical fields and the social pressures that lead to increasingly poor American student performance are interrelated.


lagr01


Jan 2, 2012, 8:08 PM
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Perhaps you should tell your friend to check these facts and to stop whinging.


SylviaSmile


Jan 3, 2012, 1:27 PM
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Urban_Cowboy wrote:
I'd agree with the two examples you gave. But you should ask him who gets the better "deal" when it involves a vehicle; especially if you're taking it to get fixed. Guys by default don't get raked over the coals as much as women do when it comes to that...even if both sexes have the same knowledge on the subject.

Definitely matters what subject is involved. I'd say it's 50/50.

I'd agree, with the caveat that there are always exceptions on both sides. Some women do not get that special assistance, due to their giving the impression that they neither need nor appreciate help from guys (and are perfectly able to get a good deal on a car on their own).

As for the discussion on the disparity of the ratio between men and women in the academic sciences, I've seen articles on that and can't help but wonder, is it possible that there are more men than women at the PhD levels in the sciences because more men than women WANT to be there? In other words, is it clear that the inequality is definitely a bad thing for women? On an anecdotal note, my best calculus professor in college was a full-time mom, a math PhD who clearly had a lot of love for the subject and was able to fit in the adjunct professorship with her other duties and responsibilities. I think it can be done, though clearly it would be difficult to have a full-time academic career along with being a full-time mom.


SylviaSmile


Jan 3, 2012, 1:32 PM
Post #24 of 40 (2192 views)
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Re: [SylviaSmile] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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Before someone gets on my case, I don't mean to say that women aren't still discriminated against in a lot of fields/places. Yes, that happens. I just wonder whether gender discrimination is the sole, or even the primary, reason why there are more men than women in the sciences.


SylviaSmile


Jan 3, 2012, 1:39 PM
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Re: [SylviaSmile] Gender-preferential treatment? [In reply to]
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And to be fair, why don't we care about statistics going the opposite direction? For instance, there are way more women than men in the nursing profession, yet no one seems to be up in arms about that.

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