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Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers
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djlachelt


Feb 28, 2012, 11:08 AM
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Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers
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I just happened upon this article and thought some people here might find this study interesting. I was just fascinated at how that actually carried out the study.

Pathomechanics of Closed Rupture of the Flexor Tendon Pulleys in Rock Climbers
http://www.jbjs.org/...ume=80&page=1012


johnwesely


Feb 28, 2012, 11:41 AM
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Re: [djlachelt] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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That was pretty interesting. I imagine if they changed the grip position, the a2 pulley would blow first. I have found that, personally, smaller holds tend to stress the a4 more, and larger holds tend to stress the a2.


shockabuku


Feb 28, 2012, 12:21 PM
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Re: [djlachelt] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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djlachelt wrote:
I just happened upon this article and thought some people here might find this study interesting. I was just fascinated at how that actually carried out the study.

Pathomechanics of Closed Rupture of the Flexor Tendon Pulleys in Rock Climbers
http://www.jbjs.org/...ume=80&page=1012

"Just happened upon." I tell my wife stuff like that after I go buy climbing gear.


onceahardman


Feb 29, 2012, 2:17 PM
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Re: [djlachelt] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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Interesting study. Obviously, it's very preliminary, and who knows what differences exist between 20-something fit and experienced trained climbers, and the dead, frozen thawed arms of 62-83 year old people at an unknown level of training.

But I'm glad some early studies are being done carefully. And it appears to confirm that crimping is how pulleys get damaged.


anarkhos


Feb 29, 2012, 3:50 PM
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Re: [onceahardman] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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In reply to:
And it appears to confirm that crimping is how pulleys get damaged.

Classic logical fallacy. All it confirms is that crimping can cause damaged pulleys, not that damaged pulleys are all caused by crimping.

I ruptured my A1 this spring after falling on a jam. I was hanging by my finger and had to climb to retrieve it. Took 9mo off. Still hurts.

I read the study when I injured it and noted how they said A1 pully ruptures didn't occur. Well, maybe if all you're doing is studying the crimp.


onceahardman


Feb 29, 2012, 4:12 PM
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Re: [anarkhos] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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Wow, anarkhos.

For the sake of brevity, I opted to oversimplify. Not really a "classic logical fallacy", in the realm of ad hominem or appeal to authority.

Please allow me to amend.

The paper demonstrates that it is plausible that crimping is a likely means of A2 and A4 pulley tears in dead, detached, frozen, thawed, elderly cadaver arms, and that A4 is weaker than A2 in dead, detached, frozen, thawed, elderly cadaver arms, and that bowstringing is only likely to be visible when both the A2 and A4 are badly damaged.

The researchers were unable to identify any damage to the A1 in the positions studied, so unfortunately, this study was of little help to you. That's not the fault of the study. They studied what they studied, and found what they found.

I hope your A1 is doing well, though.


curt


Feb 29, 2012, 6:22 PM
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Re: [onceahardman] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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onceahardman wrote:
And it appears to confirm that crimping is how pulleys get damaged.

I realize that anecdotal stories don't mean all that much but every pulley injury I have ever had resulted from open hand pocket pulling moves--and not from crimping.

Curt


onceahardman


Mar 2, 2012, 3:08 PM
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Re: [curt] Study of Pulley Rupture in Climbers [In reply to]
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curt wrote:
onceahardman wrote:
And it appears to confirm that crimping is how pulleys get damaged.

I realize that anecdotal stories don't mean all that much but every pulley injury I have ever had resulted from open hand pocket pulling moves--and not from crimping.

Curt

I remember that about you, and in fact, I thought of you before I responded to this. I really don't have a conclusive answer, but there are a 3 possibilities at least:

-You suffered a couple of oddball injuries, perhaps due to your own body geometry or physiology.

-Your injuries were not accurately diagnosed. You had a ligament or capsule injury that was misdiagnosed as a pulley.

-You briefly pulled into a crimp in the pocket(s) and injured your pulleys without realizing you were actually crimped.

Given your (respected) physics background, I hope you looked at the linked paper, and can see the obvious outward force on the A2 and A4 while crimping. This injury is almost unheard of in non-climbers.


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