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xadmx


Apr 11, 2012, 1:16 PM
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getting fit
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hi i,am looking for a bit of advice if you can help.

bit about me, i am 33 years old 5.9 tall now about 11 1/2 stone 161 pounds. all the fat seems to be on my gut lol.
but i had a back injury about 10 years ago and my fizeo guy has told me i have a weak core due to avoiding using my back.
i was a real junk food sort of guy and all i drank was fizzy drinks only :). i started climbing about 6 months ago 1-2 times a week. now i have cut out all fizzy drinks and only drink water, plus i have started to eat proper food. i have even started to look at the calories on the back of the packets lol.
so far i have lost about 7 ibs but i really need some ideas on exercises i can do and some sort of food chart of whats good to eat and how much i should eat.
any help would be appreciated.
thanks adam


singletrackmike


Apr 11, 2012, 1:23 PM
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Re: [xadmx] getting fit [In reply to]
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Hey Adam. Do a search on the Primal Diet, or Paleo Diet. In over 30 years of training and "being careful about what I eat", nothing has made a difference in my health and strength like this diet.


herites


Apr 11, 2012, 2:45 PM
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Fuck paleo and other fad shit. Either decrease your calorie intake or increase the amount of calories your body uses (working out) Counting calories could help, but if you increase your workout volume (go running for example) and eat the same amount of calories you will lose weight. Getting a strong core won't help much with your beer gut.
I can't give you exact numbers on calories, it depends on a lot of things. An average male needs 2500 calories a day, to lose 1 lb/week you should have about 300 deficit but this is really just an average. Visit a dietitian if you want the exact numbers your body needs.
Try to eat foods which make you feel full, but don't contain a lot of calories, and eat small meals often during the day. Cook for yourself, in a teflon pan, eat lean meat and veggies, etc. The results won't come fast, but they'll come steady and will stay, and you won't need any special maintaining as long as you keep your new diet and get up from your couch. Hike around crags on off days, try to be out in the nature as much as possible, (if you take a trip on a low budget it's either climb or eat, it will get results fast) don't buy any wonderpills or books about special diets.


camhead


Apr 11, 2012, 2:49 PM
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Diets are like religion. Everyone wants to proselytize theirs to you, but has no interest in hearing anyone else's thoughts.

Everyone's different, so no one diet is going to work. For the basics, I'd say cut the junk food, up the veggies, exercise, and don't eat until you're stuffed. Beyond that, you'll just have to figure out what works for you.


granite_grrl


Apr 12, 2012, 4:42 AM
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camhead wrote:
Diets are like religion. Everyone wants to proselytize theirs to you, but has no interest in hearing anyone else's thoughts.

Everyone's different, so no one diet is going to work. For the basics, I'd say cut the junk food, up the veggies, exercise, and don't eat until you're stuffed. Beyond that, you'll just have to figure out what works for you.

I would agree. Another suggestion (if you can get into it) is keeping track of your calorie intake. If you have a smart phone there are a number of apps for it (Live Strong is one of the more popular that I know of), or you could use a program on your computer.

Counting calories really helps you be aware of what you're putting into your mouth. Some things that don't seem like a bad food choice might actually have a ton of calories. Some of these things (like bread and pasta) you probably don't want to eliminate, but you can reduce how much you're taking in). For me it also makes me more conscience of my snaking, which can be a big issue for me.


xadmx


Apr 12, 2012, 9:07 AM
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thanks guys/girls some really helpful info.
adam


gogounou


Apr 13, 2012, 11:15 AM
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Hey Adam,

An rc.com user (jt512) has put together an oft-referenced guide called "How to Lose Weight to Improve Your Climbing." It includes a bit of a primer on what sorts of things to eat, and might be helpful to you. I hope that jt512 won't mind my linking to it here.

J


adelphos


Apr 13, 2012, 11:30 AM
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I've mentioned this in other posts and I'll keep preaching it as I have personally seen a lot of physical growth from it.

Do Crossfit. You don't have to go to a gym, you don't need a lot of special training. The website is free, the workout of the day is free. Crossfit is great for climbers because it does emphasize core strength and develops upper body strength.

Just one example of many:

My wife and I spent about $200 outfitting a garage gym about four years ago. When we started, she couldn't do a single pullup. I literally had to hold her legs to do a pullup. Fast forward to today, a few weeks back she completed a workout with 50, that's right 50 pullups.

5-6 days a week, typically less than 30 minutes per day. I promise you will see the results you desire.


sungam


Apr 22, 2012, 2:56 AM
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gogounou wrote:
Hey Adam,

An rc.com user (jt512) has put together an oft-referenced guide called "How to Lose Weight to Improve Your Climbing." It includes a bit of a primer on what sorts of things to eat, and might be helpful to you. I hope that jt512 won't mind my linking to it here.

J
He won't mind, he made that guide to help people lose weight to improve their climbing, not so everyone will love him and shower him with hugs and tolerance when he links it.

It really is a good guide, though.

If the OP wants even more information, I recommend getting a copy of "Gold Medal Nutrition" by Glenn Cardwell. Should be like 15 bucks on amazon. It doesn't give you a diet outline, it just gives you the information you need to make your own.

Fad diets are stupid.


rhythm164


Apr 22, 2012, 7:33 AM
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Dont make weight loss up in your mind to be something it's not, super difficult. It's not. If you're just looking to shed pounds and not do any climbing-specific training, which at 6 months in is exactly what you should be doing, the recipe is simple: stop eating shit, start doing cardio, make your own food from whole, wholesome ingredients. OK, so that's a little over simplified, but distilled, it will yield success. It's sounds like you're on the right track so far though, but do a little research, both to figure out what to eat, and what not to eat, both in big picture (e.g. - McDonalds), and on a small scale (e.g. - high fructose corn syrup). Pay attention to ingredients, consume high quality fats, fiber to help you feel full, and lean proteins. Try to keep your metabolism firing and your blood sugar on an even keel by consuming more smaller meals throughout the day instead of a few large ones. eat out less, and when you do, learn how to order off a menu intelligently, there are actually websites to help you do this. and cardio... calories in <calories out = weight loss. and it doesnt really take as much time as you might think. banging out a couple runs during the week will go a long way, or, I found it very effective to go for a mile jog every night shortly before bed, like an hour or two. it fired my metabolism up and kept it going while I was asleep. If you can, work in some time on a road bike, this is the most effective cross training I've ever done. I hear a lot of people whine about putting on leg mass from road biking, but i've not experienced this. I will generally do some short duration lunch hour rides twice a week (12-16 miles, usually working in some intervals), and a longer ride (20-30 miles) on the weekend. I've seen results in terms of increased core strength and the ability to maintain body tension during harder boulder problems, plus my V grade max has bumped up 2 grades since I started biking regularly. I will say that I'm not biking to lose weight, just as a cross training tool, so it may be different for you, but the bottom line is burning calories = weight loss. Anywyas, it's been said before, but stuff that works for me, may not work for you. experiment, figure out what your body wants by paying attention, keep journal if you like, i've never done this in terms of weight loss, but I do keep a training journal and I find it immensely advantageous. Don't buy into fad diets (basically any diet that has an actual name attached to it: Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, no. Use of your brain, yes), but do do some research, surf some nutrition blogs, and find some solid recipe websites to keep your meals intresting (epicurious, post-punk kitchen, and the Huffington Post lifestyle sections often have great options). One last thing that I personally found really helpful, weight yourself everyday, especially when you start to see results. I found nothing kept my motivation up better than seeing that improvement, not only that but it also helped me gage how much I should eat that day. If you have any questions I might be able to help with feel free to shoot me a PM.

Anyway, good luck man, you can do it, no doubt about it. A little commitment, and some minor lifestyle changes, and you'll be well on your way! Kick ass!


(This post was edited by rhythm164 on Apr 22, 2012, 7:55 AM)


Greggle


Apr 22, 2012, 10:10 AM
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Re: [rhythm164] getting fit [In reply to]
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rhythm164 wrote:
Dont make weight loss up in your mind to be something it's not, super difficult. It's not. If you're just looking to shed pounds and not do any climbing-specific training, which at 6 months in is exactly what you should be doing, the recipe is simple: stop eating shit, start doing cardio, make your own food from whole, wholesome ingredients. OK, so that's a little over simplified, but distilled, it will yield success. It's sounds like you're on the right track so far though, but do a little research, both to figure out what to eat, and what not to eat, both in big picture (e.g. - McDonalds), and on a small scale (e.g. - high fructose corn syrup). Pay attention to ingredients, consume high quality fats, fiber to help you feel full, and lean proteins. Try to keep your metabolism firing and your blood sugar on an even keel by consuming more smaller meals throughout the day instead of a few large ones. eat out less, and when you do, learn how to order off a menu intelligently, there are actually websites to help you do this. and cardio... calories in <calories out = weight loss. and it doesnt really take as much time as you might think. banging out a couple runs during the week will go a long way, or, I found it very effective to go for a mile jog every night shortly before bed, like an hour or two. it fired my metabolism up and kept it going while I was asleep. If you can, work in some time on a road bike, this is the most effective cross training I've ever done. I hear a lot of people whine about putting on leg mass from road biking, but i've not experienced this. I will generally do some short duration lunch hour rides twice a week (12-16 miles, usually working in some intervals), and a longer ride (20-30 miles) on the weekend. I've seen results in terms of increased core strength and the ability to maintain body tension during harder boulder problems, plus my V grade max has bumped up 2 grades since I started biking regularly. I will say that I'm not biking to lose weight, just as a cross training tool, so it may be different for you, but the bottom line is burning calories = weight loss. Anywyas, it's been said before, but stuff that works for me, may not work for you. experiment, figure out what your body wants by paying attention, keep journal if you like, i've never done this in terms of weight loss, but I do keep a training journal and I find it immensely advantageous. Don't buy into fad diets (basically any diet that has an actual name attached to it: Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, no. Use of your brain, yes), but do do some research, surf some nutrition blogs, and find some solid recipe websites to keep your meals intresting (epicurious, post-punk kitchen, and the Huffington Post lifestyle sections often have great options). One last thing that I personally found really helpful, weight yourself everyday, especially when you start to see results. I found nothing kept my motivation up better than seeing that improvement, not only that but it also helped me gage how much I should eat that day. If you have any questions I might be able to help with feel free to shoot me a PM.

Anyway, good luck man, you can do it, no doubt about it. A little commitment, and some minor lifestyle changes, and you'll be well on your way! Kick ass!

Who the fuck's going to read that?


sungam


Apr 22, 2012, 11:21 AM
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Greggle wrote:
Who the fuck's going to read that?
Greggle, despite the fact he is deluded and thinks "Knight of the Old Republic" was better then "Diablo 2", is right. So I am going to dish out some Fluttershy magnitude love and format that motherfucker.


rhythm164 wrote:
Dont make weight loss up in your mind to be something it's not, super difficult. It's not.

If you're just looking to shed pounds and not do any climbing-specific training, which at 6 months in is exactly what you should be doing, the recipe is simple: stop eating shit, start doing cardio, make your own food from whole, wholesome ingredients.

OK, so that's a little over simplified, but distilled, it will yield success.

It's sounds like you're on the right track so far though, but do a little research, both to figure out what to eat, and what not to eat, both in big picture (e.g. - McDonalds), and on a small scale (e.g. - high fructose corn syrup).

Pay attention to ingredients, consume high quality fats, fiber to help you feel full, and lean proteins.

Try to keep your metabolism firing and your blood sugar on an even keel by consuming more smaller meals throughout the day instead of a few large ones.

eat out less, and when you do, learn how to order off a menu intelligently, there are actually websites to help you do this.


and cardio... calories in <calories out = weight loss. and it doesnt really take as much time as you might think.

banging out a couple runs during the week will go a long way, or, I found it very effective to go for a mile jog every night shortly before bed, like an hour or two. it fired my metabolism up and kept it going while I was asleep.


If you can, work in some time on a road bike, this is the most effective cross training I've ever done. I hear a lot of people whine about putting on leg mass from road biking, but i've not experienced this. I will generally do some short duration lunch hour rides twice a week (12-16 miles, usually working in some intervals), and a longer ride (20-30 miles) on the weekend. I've seen results in terms of increased core strength and the ability to maintain body tension during harder boulder problems, plus my V grade max has bumped up 2 grades since I started biking regularly. I will say that I'm not biking to lose weight, just as a cross training tool, so it may be different for you, but the bottom line is burning calories = weight loss.

Anywyas, it's been said before, but stuff that works for me, may not work for you. experiment, figure out what your body wants by paying attention, keep journal if you like, i've never done this in terms of weight loss, but I do keep a training journal and I find it immensely advantageous. Don't buy into fad diets (basically any diet that has an actual name attached to it: Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, no. Use of your brain, yes), but do do some research, surf some nutrition blogs, and find some solid recipe websites to keep your meals intresting (epicurious, post-punk kitchen, and the Huffington Post lifestyle sections often have great options).


One last thing that I personally found really helpful, weight yourself everyday, especially when you start to see results. I found nothing kept my motivation up better than seeing that improvement, not only that but it also helped me gage how much I should eat that day. If you have any questions I might be able to help with feel free to shoot me a PM.

Anyway, good luck man, you can do it, no doubt about it. A little commitment, and some minor lifestyle changes, and you'll be well on your way! Kick ass!


I guess I'll also post Spikkedem's awesome spreadsheet:
http://mail.rockclimbing.com/..._reply;so=ASC;mh=25;


Greggle


Apr 22, 2012, 11:58 AM
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sungam wrote:
Greggle wrote:
Who the fuck's going to read that?
Greggle, despite the fact he is deluded and thinks "Knight of the Old Republic" was better then "Diablo 2", is right. So I am going to dish out some Fluttershy magnitude love and format that motherfucker.


rhythm164 wrote:
Dont make weight loss up in your mind to be something it's not, super difficult. It's not.

If you're just looking to shed pounds and not do any climbing-specific training, which at 6 months in is exactly what you should be doing, the recipe is simple: stop eating shit, start doing cardio, make your own food from whole, wholesome ingredients.

OK, so that's a little over simplified, but distilled, it will yield success.

It's sounds like you're on the right track so far though, but do a little research, both to figure out what to eat, and what not to eat, both in big picture (e.g. - McDonalds), and on a small scale (e.g. - high fructose corn syrup).

Pay attention to ingredients, consume high quality fats, fiber to help you feel full, and lean proteins.

Try to keep your metabolism firing and your blood sugar on an even keel by consuming more smaller meals throughout the day instead of a few large ones.

eat out less, and when you do, learn how to order off a menu intelligently, there are actually websites to help you do this.


and cardio... calories in <calories out = weight loss. and it doesnt really take as much time as you might think.

banging out a couple runs during the week will go a long way, or, I found it very effective to go for a mile jog every night shortly before bed, like an hour or two. it fired my metabolism up and kept it going while I was asleep.


If you can, work in some time on a road bike, this is the most effective cross training I've ever done. I hear a lot of people whine about putting on leg mass from road biking, but i've not experienced this. I will generally do some short duration lunch hour rides twice a week (12-16 miles, usually working in some intervals), and a longer ride (20-30 miles) on the weekend. I've seen results in terms of increased core strength and the ability to maintain body tension during harder boulder problems, plus my V grade max has bumped up 2 grades since I started biking regularly. I will say that I'm not biking to lose weight, just as a cross training tool, so it may be different for you, but the bottom line is burning calories = weight loss.

Anywyas, it's been said before, but stuff that works for me, may not work for you. experiment, figure out what your body wants by paying attention, keep journal if you like, i've never done this in terms of weight loss, but I do keep a training journal and I find it immensely advantageous. Don't buy into fad diets (basically any diet that has an actual name attached to it: Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, no. Use of your brain, yes), but do do some research, surf some nutrition blogs, and find some solid recipe websites to keep your meals intresting (epicurious, post-punk kitchen, and the Huffington Post lifestyle sections often have great options).


One last thing that I personally found really helpful, weight yourself everyday, especially when you start to see results. I found nothing kept my motivation up better than seeing that improvement, not only that but it also helped me gage how much I should eat that day. If you have any questions I might be able to help with feel free to shoot me a PM.

Anyway, good luck man, you can do it, no doubt about it. A little commitment, and some minor lifestyle changes, and you'll be well on your way! Kick ass!


I guess I'll also post Spikkedem's awesome spreadsheet:
http://mail.rockclimbing.com/..._reply;so=ASC;mh=25;

You're the Shining Armor to my Princess Cadence.


sungam


Apr 22, 2012, 12:27 PM
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Re: [Greggle] getting fit [In reply to]
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Greggle wrote:
sungam wrote:
Greggle wrote:
Who the fuck's going to read that?
Greggle, despite the fact he is deluded and thinks "Knight of the Old Republic" was better then "Diablo 2", is right. So I am going to dish out some Fluttershy magnitude love and format that motherfucker.


rhythm164 wrote:
Dont make weight loss up in your mind to be something it's not, super difficult. It's not.

If you're just looking to shed pounds and not do any climbing-specific training, which at 6 months in is exactly what you should be doing, the recipe is simple: stop eating shit, start doing cardio, make your own food from whole, wholesome ingredients.

OK, so that's a little over simplified, but distilled, it will yield success.

It's sounds like you're on the right track so far though, but do a little research, both to figure out what to eat, and what not to eat, both in big picture (e.g. - McDonalds), and on a small scale (e.g. - high fructose corn syrup).

Pay attention to ingredients, consume high quality fats, fiber to help you feel full, and lean proteins.

Try to keep your metabolism firing and your blood sugar on an even keel by consuming more smaller meals throughout the day instead of a few large ones.

eat out less, and when you do, learn how to order off a menu intelligently, there are actually websites to help you do this.


and cardio... calories in <calories out = weight loss. and it doesnt really take as much time as you might think.

banging out a couple runs during the week will go a long way, or, I found it very effective to go for a mile jog every night shortly before bed, like an hour or two. it fired my metabolism up and kept it going while I was asleep.


If you can, work in some time on a road bike, this is the most effective cross training I've ever done. I hear a lot of people whine about putting on leg mass from road biking, but i've not experienced this. I will generally do some short duration lunch hour rides twice a week (12-16 miles, usually working in some intervals), and a longer ride (20-30 miles) on the weekend. I've seen results in terms of increased core strength and the ability to maintain body tension during harder boulder problems, plus my V grade max has bumped up 2 grades since I started biking regularly. I will say that I'm not biking to lose weight, just as a cross training tool, so it may be different for you, but the bottom line is burning calories = weight loss.

Anywyas, it's been said before, but stuff that works for me, may not work for you. experiment, figure out what your body wants by paying attention, keep journal if you like, i've never done this in terms of weight loss, but I do keep a training journal and I find it immensely advantageous. Don't buy into fad diets (basically any diet that has an actual name attached to it: Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, no. Use of your brain, yes), but do do some research, surf some nutrition blogs, and find some solid recipe websites to keep your meals intresting (epicurious, post-punk kitchen, and the Huffington Post lifestyle sections often have great options).


One last thing that I personally found really helpful, weight yourself everyday, especially when you start to see results. I found nothing kept my motivation up better than seeing that improvement, not only that but it also helped me gage how much I should eat that day. If you have any questions I might be able to help with feel free to shoot me a PM.

Anyway, good luck man, you can do it, no doubt about it. A little commitment, and some minor lifestyle changes, and you'll be well on your way! Kick ass!


I guess I'll also post Spikkedem's awesome spreadsheet:
http://mail.rockclimbing.com/..._reply;so=ASC;mh=25;

You're the Shining Armor to my Princess Cadence.



rhythm164


Apr 22, 2012, 2:33 PM
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Greggle wrote:
Who the fuck's going to read that?

possibly the OP, who's interested in dropping some weight. if I had to guess.


sungam


Apr 23, 2012, 1:00 AM
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rhythm164 wrote:
Greggle wrote:
Who the fuck's going to read that?

possibly the OP, who's interested in dropping some weight. if I had to guess.
I think he was talking about how it just appeared as a daunting wall of text. Blocks of text like that are hard to read.


Verticality


Apr 23, 2012, 3:30 AM
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http://www.nicros.com/training/

The Nicros (a holds manufacturer) website has an excellent training section which adresses pretty much all areas in some basic detail. A good place to start if you're committed to improving.


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