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rocdr


Jun 29, 2012, 4:07 PM
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Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale
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[http://www.ebay.com/itm/190697243098?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649]

http://www.ebay.com/itm/190697243098?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

Runs like new, no prob starting. A week ago I drilled 20 holes in super hard Central WY quartzite on a 1/4 tank. Went through 2 bits but the drill wanted more.
Asked for $225.


splish


Jul 21, 2012, 5:46 PM
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Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?


dagibbs


Jul 21, 2012, 6:39 PM
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splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.


majid_sabet


Jul 21, 2012, 8:45 PM
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I have few of them and two rare hilti gas operated SDS hammer drill. These are very hard to find items and pricy.The new one can go up as much as $1000 and I can't see how we could operate without them specially, when we are in a part of world where finding power on site and recharging battery will be a nightmare and not to mentioned heavy battery pack and cost . At 13 lbs, these gas operated drill outrun any SDS cordless drill.






splish


Jul 22, 2012, 10:32 PM
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dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!


Kartessa


Jul 23, 2012, 7:59 AM
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splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

Says the guy who bolts sandstone bricks...


granite_grrl


Jul 23, 2012, 9:43 AM
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dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

I just checked out Majid's photos and a gas drill like that looks pretty kick ass! Batteries go bad. I've known a few people who have retro fitted their hammer drills with hobby batteries, but it's a really heavy setup.

Also, cold batteries don't work for long, which is a problem when bolting in the winter. A gas drill would be great for this.


granite_grrl


Jul 23, 2012, 9:45 AM
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Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

Says the guy who bolts sandstone bricks...

Yes, the stone that you're drilling makes a HUGE difference in how hard a drill has to work.


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 10:24 AM
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Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

Says the guy who bolts sandstone bricks...

Actually I didn't bolt, nor do I climb the sandstone archways. That was somebody else. Look at the photos again, I bolted the piers which are mainly limestone and granite blocks.

It's listed on RC.com as Canada, Ontario, Golden Horseshoe, Jordan Harbour. It's not the greatest climbing spot, but it's the only one that is close and it's great for training.


JimTitt


Jul 23, 2012, 10:31 AM
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splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

You´ve clearly no idea of how effective gas drills are (and how much of a pain in the butt they can be) nor any idea about energy storage!
The best are from Atlas Copco but you want to be a REAL MAN to lug one of theirs around.


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 10:40 AM
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No, that was exactly my point. I have never heard of these, so I don't know anything about them.
But I would not want to lug one of these around when I have access to many high end battery hammer drills, and more than enough batteries to complete any task that presents itself.
Anyway, my batteries have never been affected by the cold, nor do they run out fast, and they are a fraction of the weight of gas powered tools. Yes the batteries do eventually die, but they are relatively cheap, and the Rigid ones are guaranteed for life as long as you fill out and mail in the Warranty card.


Kartessa


Jul 23, 2012, 11:02 AM
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splish wrote:
Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

Says the guy who bolts sandstone bricks...

Actually I didn't bolt, nor do I climb the sandstone archways. That was somebody else. Look at the photos again, I bolted the piers which are mainly limestone and granite blocks.

It's listed on RC.com as Canada, Ontario, Golden Horseshoe, Jordan Harbour. It's not the greatest climbing spot, but it's the only one that is close and it's great for training.

http://www.rockclimbing.com/...Detailed/109372.html

Says "we" bolted 35 climbs... implies you had some part in it.

Just a little info for you though: Southern Ontario has hundreds of routes on real/actual rock. Only 35min from Jordan.


USnavy


Jul 23, 2012, 11:05 AM
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splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
too!
I dont think you cant use the word 18v and higher end in the same sentence. Wink As far as rotary hammer drills go, 18v is the bottom of the scale. My drill is the larger Bosch Bulldog and it uses 36v lithium ion batteries. I can drill 20 1/2" x 2.75" holes in steel hard basalt on ONE battery, not three. Oh, and I paid less for my drill than you did. Although I will give you one point, one pound is pretty light. Actually that seems impossibly light for a rotary hammer drill, my drill is something like 8 lbs. Which drill do you have?


(This post was edited by USnavy on Jul 23, 2012, 11:05 AM)


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 11:49 AM
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USnavy wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
too!
I dont think you cant use the word 18v and higher end in the same sentence. Wink As far as rotary hammer drills go, 18v is the bottom of the scale. My drill is the larger Bosch Bulldog and it uses 36v lithium ion batteries. I can drill 20 1/2" x 2.75" holes in steel hard basalt on ONE battery, not three. Oh, and I paid less for my drill than you did. Although I will give you one point, one pound is pretty light. Actually that seems impossibly light for a rotary hammer drill, my drill is something like 8 lbs. Which drill do you have?

I do residential contracting, so I don't have the big work horse hammer drills. I use a RIGID X2, Model: R8411503 1/2" Hammer Drill, it weighs 4.5Lbs. And the batter is the Rigid Max 2.5Ah 18V Model: CS0851. about 1.7Lbs




USnavy


Jul 23, 2012, 11:58 AM
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splish wrote:
USnavy wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
too!
I dont think you cant use the word 18v and higher end in the same sentence. Wink As far as rotary hammer drills go, 18v is the bottom of the scale. My drill is the larger Bosch Bulldog and it uses 36v lithium ion batteries. I can drill 20 1/2" x 2.75" holes in steel hard basalt on ONE battery, not three. Oh, and I paid less for my drill than you did. Although I will give you one point, one pound is pretty light. Actually that seems impossibly light for a rotary hammer drill, my drill is something like 8 lbs. Which drill do you have?

I do residential contracting, so I don't have the big work horse hammer drills. I use a RIGID X2, Model: R8411503 1/2" Hammer Drill, it weighs 4.5Lbs. And the batter is the Rigid Max 2.5Ah 18V Model: CS0851. about 1.7Lbs

[image]http://img2.shoptoit.ca/images/detail/49282000/49282940.jpg[/image]
Ah, well that is not a rotary hammer drill, that is just a general around the house multi-drill. A word of warning, do not use that drill to place bolts, unless you are placing glue-in bolts or you are drilling in very soft rock. Here is the problem, when you use a drill like that for an application in which it is not designed for (heavy masonry work, AKA bolting sport routes,) you end up getting asymmetrical holes that take an "S" shape through the rock. When it takes you five minutes to drill one hole, you get impatient and press hard. That forces the drill bit to wonder, creating an asymmetrical hole. If you install an expansion bolt into a hole like this, only a small portion of the expansion clip or sleeve may actually come into contact with the rock. That can lead to a comprised placement and a greatly reduced pull out strength. I also have Bosch's 36v Li-ion multi-drill, which is a larger version of the drill you posted. However, even though it is Bosch's top of the line multi-drill, it still takes five minutes to drill a 3/8" hole in basalt. I placed five 3/8" Power-Bolts in holes drilled by my multi-drill and three of the five pulled out below their rating. One pulled with only 4 kN.

It is not as much of an issue with glue-in bolts, because glue-in bolts do not have an expansion clip, so it does not really matter. It also does not matter as much for really soft rock because the drill is normally powerful enough for that type of rock. But for hard rock, you need to be using a rotary hammer drill.

Also, you got seriously hosed on that purchase. I paid $230 for my Bosch multi-drill and it is more powerful than yours, and it is 36V. I have the 18636. You may want to consider getting one for your next replacement, they are really nice. The only downside is they are heavy as hell. Frown


(This post was edited by USnavy on Jul 23, 2012, 12:07 PM)


majid_sabet


Jul 23, 2012, 12:05 PM
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splish wrote:
No, that was exactly my point. I have never heard of these, so I don't know anything about them.
But I would not want to lug one of these around when I have access to many high end battery hammer drills, and more than enough batteries to complete any task that presents itself.
Anyway, my batteries have never been affected by the cold, nor do they run out fast, and they are a fraction of the weight of gas powered tools. Yes the batteries do eventually die, but they are relatively cheap, and the Rigid ones are guaranteed for life as long as you fill out and mail in the Warranty card.

you do not own gasoline drill nor know nothing about them so why do you even make any comment on something you do even not know ?

plus, your cordless drill will function poorly in cold weather especially in freezing temp cause rechargeable batteries do not produce enough current when cold to drill back to back. A cup of gasoline can allow a gasoline drill to drill in any conditions, cold / hot whatever.


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 12:12 PM
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USnavy wrote:
splish wrote:
USnavy wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
too!
I dont think you cant use the word 18v and higher end in the same sentence. Wink As far as rotary hammer drills go, 18v is the bottom of the scale. My drill is the larger Bosch Bulldog and it uses 36v lithium ion batteries. I can drill 20 1/2" x 2.75" holes in steel hard basalt on ONE battery, not three. Oh, and I paid less for my drill than you did. Although I will give you one point, one pound is pretty light. Actually that seems impossibly light for a rotary hammer drill, my drill is something like 8 lbs. Which drill do you have?

I do residential contracting, so I don't have the big work horse hammer drills. I use a RIGID X2, Model: R8411503 1/2" Hammer Drill, it weighs 4.5Lbs. And the batter is the Rigid Max 2.5Ah 18V Model: CS0851. about 1.7Lbs

[image]http://img2.shoptoit.ca/images/detail/49282000/49282940.jpg[/image]
Ah, well that is not a rotary hammer drill, that is just a general around the house multi-drill. A word of warning, do not use that drill to place bolts, unless you are placing glue-in bolts or you are drilling in very soft rock. Here is the problem, when you use a drill like that for an application in which it is not designed for (heavy masonry work, AKA bolting sport routes,) you end up getting asymmetrical holes that take an "S" shape through the rock. When it takes you five minutes to drill one hole, you get impatient and press hard. That forces the drill bit to wonder, creating an asymmetrical hole. If you install an expansion bolt into a hole like this, only a small portion of the expansion clip or sleeve may actually come into contact with the rock. That can lead to a comprised placement and a greatly reduced pull out strength. I also have Bosch's 36v Li-ion multi-drill, which is a larger version of the drill you posted. However, even though it is Bosch's top of the line multi-drill, it still takes five minutes to drill a 3/8" hole in basalt. I placed five 3/8" Power-Bolts in holes drilled by my multi-drill and three of the five pulled out below their rating. One pulled with only 4 kN.

It is not as much of an issue with glue-in bolts, because glue-in bolts do not have an expansion clip, so it does not really matter. It also does not matter as much for really soft rock because the drill is normally powerful enough for that type of rock. But for hard rock, you need to be using a rotary hammer drill.

Also, you got seriously hosed on that purchase. I paid $230 for my Bosch multi-drill and it is more powerful than yours.

I am sorry, but I disagree with that. It's not the drill, it is the operator.

My father has a few trades, Pattern Maker, Gas Fitter, Carpenter. So we have been drilling and placing anchor bolts in to concrete for a combined 40 years at least. If you have a good sharp masonary bit, and you hold your drill steady, the anchor will not pull out. Also the forces on an anchor bolt are sheer forces. Unless it is in an overhang.

This is not a common household multi-drill, it is contractor grade. Yes, it does take approx. 2 to 4 minutes per hole, but I am experienced in drilling, and placing anchor bolts. In many situations, the anchors I have placed for construction purposes hold much higher forces than that of climbing.

Another very important part of the puzzle is the actual anchor bolt you use. There are over 15 different kinds of sleeve systems on anchor bolts, some are much better than others. Most people don't even pay attention to the sleeves on their bolts. But the anchor bolts with the full length sleeves are the worst. If the bolt is not placed in at full depth, the sleeve can actually bind and not allow the anchoring sleeve to expand as it should.

Not many climbers carry impact guns or torque wrenches with them. So another reason your bolts may pull out is because they were under or over tightened. All concrete anchors are supposed to be torqued to certain specifications. These specs measured in ft-lbs ensure that the sleeve spreads and applies even force to the entire hole.

If the hole is over-sized, then the bolt will never fully tighten. It will run down to the end of the threads and stop there. At that point, it will seem like it is placed properly because the nut can no longer spin. That is a very dangerous situation. But is easily detected by the length of the bolt sticking out of the hole. If you places your bolt in with only a 1/4" sticking out, and when you are done tightening it, there is 3/4" out, then you have a problem! It should never take any more than 5 or 6 turns to lock the wedge in place.


(This post was edited by splish on Jul 23, 2012, 12:33 PM)


granite_grrl


Jul 23, 2012, 12:26 PM
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Re: [Kartessa] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

Says the guy who bolts sandstone bricks...

Actually I didn't bolt, nor do I climb the sandstone archways. That was somebody else. Look at the photos again, I bolted the piers which are mainly limestone and granite blocks.

It's listed on RC.com as Canada, Ontario, Golden Horseshoe, Jordan Harbour. It's not the greatest climbing spot, but it's the only one that is close and it's great for training.

http://www.rockclimbing.com/...Detailed/109372.html

Says "we" bolted 35 climbs... implies you had some part in it.

Just a little info for you though: Southern Ontario has hundreds of routes on real/actual rock. Only 35min from Jordan.

We noticed that too. Considering most of those routes have been there since I've started visiting the place I was very surprised (because I thought I knew the group that did most of hte bolting out there), but didn't care enough to start asking questions.

Listen Splish, people appreciate a partner who is honest about their experience and abilities. I consider people who exagerate on these points to be a liability.


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 12:41 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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granite_grrl wrote:
Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
Kartessa wrote:
splish wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

Well, that's because you guys use drills like Ryobi, and suck. I have higher end drills. My Rigid drill are $640 each, one is an 18V, and one is a 24V Lithium.
I have 6 battery packs between the 2 drills. Last time out I brought the 18V with 3 battery packs. The batteries weigh in at 1.7Lbs each and the drill is just over 1Lbs. I drilled 24 3" x 3/8" holes and didn't even use the 3rd battery.
Ryobi is actually owned by Rigid. It is their lower grade tool, just like Dewalt owns Black & Decker and so on. If you want to drill all day, carry less weight up the rope, look into some Rigid drills, the new lithiums are super light, or the new milwauki drills are amazing too!

Says the guy who bolts sandstone bricks...

Actually I didn't bolt, nor do I climb the sandstone archways. That was somebody else. Look at the photos again, I bolted the piers which are mainly limestone and granite blocks.

It's listed on RC.com as Canada, Ontario, Golden Horseshoe, Jordan Harbour. It's not the greatest climbing spot, but it's the only one that is close and it's great for training.

http://www.rockclimbing.com/...Detailed/109372.html

Says "we" bolted 35 climbs... implies you had some part in it.

Just a little info for you though: Southern Ontario has hundreds of routes on real/actual rock. Only 35min from Jordan.

We noticed that too. Considering most of those routes have been there since I've started visiting the place I was very surprised (because I thought I knew the group that did most of hte bolting out there), but didn't care enough to start asking questions.

Listen Splish, people appreciate a partner who is honest about their experience and abilities. I consider people who exagerate on these points to be a liability.


It does say we, meaning over the years, climbs have been bolted, added, adjusted, and bolts replaced.
Granted, I was not involved in every single route, I have done much to help maintain it, including adding bolts, replacing bolts, building decks for the bottom of the pier (which I need some repairs), replacing the webbing on regular basis, adding chains in some areas, and just last weekend adding bottom anchors to climb using a soloist. The origional routes in the 2 archways, I had nothing to do with them, but I do know the group of guys who did them, and have spoken to them on occassion. Jason, Randall, Andre, and a few others whose names I can't remember at the moment. One of which manages a rescue company in Grimsby.
I was just making a generalization as "we" including everyone who ever helped over the years.


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 12:52 PM
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Re: [splish] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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If you guys really want to pick on something, pick on the fact that I mentioned there are about 35 climbs there. According to RC.com, there are only 16.
I think there are more than that, but I never follow the routes anyway.


granite_grrl


Jul 23, 2012, 1:25 PM
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Re: [splish] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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splish wrote:
If you guys really want to pick on something, pick on the fact that I mentioned there are about 35 climbs there. According to RC.com, there are only 16.
I think there are more than that, but I never follow the routes anyway.

I don't think you're helping your case.


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 1:33 PM
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Re: [granite_grrl] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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I wasn't trying to help my case...
I really don't have a case to help.
Implying a case would mean I am trying to win some arguement or put myself in a better situation. I am not.
I am simply bored and reading through some forums. I comment on the forums as I see fit as that is the whole purpose of a forum.
I may not always be right, nor is anyone here. We all have opinions and such.
Anyway, happy climbing, take care.


anthonymason


Jul 23, 2012, 6:02 PM
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Re: [splish] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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1st off, I've been a contractor for years, Being a Plumber,and a Carpenter I have many real RIGID tools, when Rigid was bought out a few years back they started making drills and light home duty tools.

I work often in Hospitals in California setting siesmic anchors, Granted these anchors are the for siesmic loads and differ from climbing anchors, Drilling the holes requires the same skill.
When using a non-rotary hammer drill it can cause the hole to be out of shape, I won't say its just the tool/or operators fault, but having the right tool for the job pays off.

Having a Gas powered rotary hammer drill in or around civilization seems like over kill, but if you venture away from the western civilized world I would definitly buy one.

My vote for proffesional drills are for HILTI.
Whether they are 18v-36v cordless, corded/gas rotary-hammers or coring hammers they simply have no competition.Cool


splish


Jul 23, 2012, 9:14 PM
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Re: [anthonymason] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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anthonymason wrote:
1st off, I've been a contractor for years, Being a Plumber,and a Carpenter I have many real RIGID tools, when Rigid was bought out a few years back they started making drills and light home duty tools.

I work often in Hospitals in California setting siesmic anchors, Granted these anchors are the for siesmic loads and differ from climbing anchors, Drilling the holes requires the same skill.
When using a non-rotary hammer drill it can cause the hole to be out of shape, I won't say its just the tool/or operators fault, but having the right tool for the job pays off.

Having a Gas powered rotary hammer drill in or around civilization seems like over kill, but if you venture away from the western civilized world I would definitly buy one.

My vote for proffesional drills are for HILTI.
Whether they are 18v-36v cordless, corded/gas rotary-hammers or coring hammers they simply have no competition.Cool

I would agree with you. Hilti or Bosch would be my choices as well. My father is the real contractor in the family.
I just do small home renovations, bathrooms, kitchen remodels, and basement finishing mostly.
Most of the concrete anchors I put in are into foundations for wall fasteners, or for brackets to hold up air conditioning brackets, and such. But I have done a few for large signage, and with the wind forces they take, I would say it is equivalent or higher than climbing forces.
I don't disagree that the holes are always perfect when drilled with a smaller grade drill, but I do disagree the anchor will pull out because of a slight deformation in the hole.
The drill bit would snap before the hole became that far out of alignment. My rigid is the X2 with the steel housing and steel gears, not the newer cheaper ones. It has drilled thousands of holes through just about everything. In the last summer, I used it on 17 decks to anchor the rim joist into the foundations, and then used the same drill to drill out and install all the lag bolts and installed all the deck screws. It is a very powerful and reliable drill.
I grew up using Milwaki and Makita, but switched to Rigid because of the warranty.
I did burn out one rigid drill, a $500 drill, went to home depot, and they didn't make that one anymore, so they gave me the next model up right off the shelf. I also have thier portable table saw, 12" double compound slider miter saw, and a whole arsenal of rigid hand power tools and cordless tools. My father is even starting to switch over now after 30 years of using nothing but Milwauki and Makita.
They are a great tool if you spend the money and get the higher grade...


majid_sabet


Jul 23, 2012, 10:04 PM
Post #25 of 98 (8944 views)
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Re: [granite_grrl] Ryobi Gas Powered Drill for Sale [In reply to]
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granite_grrl wrote:
dagibbs wrote:
splish wrote:
Didn't even know they make these, and I am a contractor. I have 3 Rigid Hammer Drill, battery powered. Why would anyone want to lug a gas engine up a route to bolt it when there are cordless drills?

Because gasoline packs more energy-density than rechargeable batteries. Or, to put it another way, you can drill a lot more into hard rock with one of these per amount of fuel/battery hauled in.

I just checked out Majid's photos and a gas drill like that looks pretty kick ass! Batteries go bad. I've known a few people who have retro fitted their hammer drills with hobby batteries, but it's a really heavy setup.

Also, cold batteries don't work for long, which is a problem when bolting in the winter. A gas drill would be great for this.










(This post was edited by majid_sabet on Jul 23, 2012, 10:29 PM)

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