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"Reading" a Problem
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Conquistador


Aug 21, 2012, 4:47 PM
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"Reading" a Problem
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When I approach a wall, esp. for indoor bouldering (I should qualify) I find that I tend to get "lost" amongst the routes. I have a hard time figuring out the best approach, and once I'm there I get a bit colorblind and won't see holds that are right in front of my face.

Any advice on how to "read" problems for optimal performance?


csiebsen


Aug 22, 2012, 3:19 PM
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Re: [Conquistador] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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I think building those skills only comes with practice. My first time climbing indoors was similar to yours but now it comes pretty naturally. You'll start to see what the setter had in mind for the route and you'll start making mental notes where the holds are so you can find them with your feet.

Have fun with it, it's a great hobby.


jbro_135


Aug 23, 2012, 8:32 AM
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Re: [Conquistador] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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I've had the same problem lately since I moved and joined a new gym. I have lots of climbing experience, but it's still a sea of multi-colored tape to me too. You get used to it eventually.


ecade


Aug 23, 2012, 8:56 AM
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Re: [Conquistador] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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Conquistador wrote:
When I approach a wall, esp. for indoor bouldering (I should qualify) I find that I tend to get "lost" amongst the routes. I have a hard time figuring out the best approach, and once I'm there I get a bit colorblind and won't see holds that are right in front of my face.

Any advice on how to "read" problems for optimal performance?

I do this really laughable thing that i find helps (and it makes other at the gym or crag smile so its win win)

I dance it out. Well perhaps its not dancing, but that's what obersevers often say I'm doing.

I study the problem, figuring out the optimal way to grab holds, body position, leg movements etc... and then I run myself through it eyes open focusing on each hold, mimicking facial expressions (like that face you can make gripping a tough crimp), breathing etc... until i can do it eyes closed. I mimic nearly every part of the problem.

You will look very silly, people will laugh and giggle, but I find this helps a lot for me. And besides people are smiling more, who cares if they laugh at you, the sports personal and i find this has help me reach my personal bests

Best of luck


petsfed


Aug 23, 2012, 9:05 AM
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Re: [ecade] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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ecade wrote:
Conquistador wrote:
When I approach a wall, esp. for indoor bouldering (I should qualify) I find that I tend to get "lost" amongst the routes. I have a hard time figuring out the best approach, and once I'm there I get a bit colorblind and won't see holds that are right in front of my face.

Any advice on how to "read" problems for optimal performance?

I do this really laughable thing that i find helps (and it makes other at the gym or crag smile so its win win)

I dance it out. Well perhaps its not dancing, but that's what obersevers often say I'm doing.

I study the problem, figuring out the optimal way to grab holds, body position, leg movements etc... and then I run myself through it eyes open focusing on each hold, mimicking facial expressions (like that face you can make gripping a tough crimp), breathing etc... until i can do it eyes closed. I mimic nearly every part of the problem.

You will look very silly, people will laugh and giggle, but I find this helps a lot for me. And besides people are smiling more, who cares if they laugh at you, the sports personal and i find this has help me reach my personal bests

Best of luck

This. If you need help seeing those sequences, then climb more and pick up a technique trainer like The Self Coached Climber, but mostly just force yourself to pick out all the holds, then start trying to figure out how to link any two adjacent holds. You don't need to work out the entire problem, but a move or two may help.


edge


Aug 23, 2012, 10:16 AM
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Re: [petsfed] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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petsfed wrote:
ecade wrote:
Conquistador wrote:
When I approach a wall, esp. for indoor bouldering (I should qualify) I find that I tend to get "lost" amongst the routes. I have a hard time figuring out the best approach, and once I'm there I get a bit colorblind and won't see holds that are right in front of my face.

Any advice on how to "read" problems for optimal performance?

I do this really laughable thing that i find helps (and it makes other at the gym or crag smile so its win win)

I dance it out. Well perhaps its not dancing, but that's what obersevers often say I'm doing.

I study the problem, figuring out the optimal way to grab holds, body position, leg movements etc... and then I run myself through it eyes open focusing on each hold, mimicking facial expressions (like that face you can make gripping a tough crimp), breathing etc... until i can do it eyes closed. I mimic nearly every part of the problem.

You will look very silly, people will laugh and giggle, but I find this helps a lot for me. And besides people are smiling more, who cares if they laugh at you, the sports personal and i find this has help me reach my personal bests

Best of luck

This. If you need help seeing those sequences, then climb more and pick up a technique trainer like The Self Coached Climber, but mostly just force yourself to pick out all the holds, then start trying to figure out how to link any two adjacent holds. You don't need to work out the entire problem, but a move or two may help.

I agree with these posts. Virtually all competition climbers mime the moves from the ground while previewing a route. Generally speaking, this is easier to do on indoor routes, but can also be of help indoors.

I find that it is also helpful when you can't figure out a sequence to pick a higher point that you know you will want to be in a certain position and figure it out "top down" to get a fresh perspective.


Conquistador


Aug 23, 2012, 12:36 PM
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Re: [petsfed] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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Thanks for the tips, all --

I have seen in videos the 'dancing' climbers do to prepare a send, but never tried it out for efficacy myself. It does seem silly but anyone who is taking things seriously should understand the intent -- anyone taking it too seriously probably shouldn't be climbing!

Picked up 'Self-Coached Climber' after numerous recommendations, it seems a great resource but I am only starting to read through it.

Thanks to all again!


knubs


Aug 23, 2012, 1:55 PM
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Re: [Conquistador] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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keep looking ahead. i dont climb indoors much, but outdoors i find the route and once i am about to climb it i stand there and ignore all the stuff that people are saying to me then i focus on the first few moves in a route (up to the first piece of gear at least) and then i execute those planned moves. my feet know where to go already at that point so im not looking down much and i can keep looking up at the moves i'm not even to yet. this allows me to climb much smoother and more efficiently,
it sucks being on a climb and zoning on where you are at too much. it's hard to see the holds all around you.
the biggest thing is just being experienced enough to know what moves you can and cant do. i couldnt plan ahead at all until i started learning different moves that work for me and getting more experience with them.


Syd


Oct 27, 2012, 1:12 AM
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Re: [knubs] "Reading" a Problem [In reply to]
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I've climbed indoors with color blind guys. It really is quite painful. You could always climb outdoors, where color doesn't count. You will always find it hard to "see" moves on hard routes though. That's why climbers project.


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