Forums: Climbing Information: Injury Treatment and Prevention:
Preventing a rope burn injury
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Injury Treatment and Prevention

Premier Sponsor:

 


midtempo


Aug 29, 2012, 9:31 AM
Post #1 of 17 (3285 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 16, 2012
Posts: 9

Preventing a rope burn injury
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I took my first lead falls this past weekend. On the first fall, I got a nasty rope burn injury and a resulting second- or first-degree burn. I would like to know if, during sport climbing, there is a way of climbing or managing the rope that would prevent this sort of injury from happening in the first place. I am guessing that there really isn't.


lena_chita
Moderator

Aug 29, 2012, 9:45 AM
Post #2 of 17 (3274 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 27, 2006
Posts: 5695

Re: [midtempo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (3 ratings)  
Can't Post

midtempo wrote:
I took my first lead falls this past weekend. On the first fall, I got a nasty rope burn injury and a resulting second- or first-degree burn. I would like to know if, during sport climbing, there is a way of climbing or managing the rope that would prevent this sort of injury from happening in the first place. I am guessing that there really isn't.


Um, if there wasn't then top-level sport climbers wouldn't have any unburned skin left, there would be nothing but criss-cross of scars... and that is obviously not the case.

You can go a long way towards preventing a rope burn (or, even more unpleasantly, an upside-down flip) by making sure your rope is not behind your foot as you are moving. It seems more complicated than it sounds at first, because as soon as we are talking meandering routes, overhanging terrain requiring flagging, backstepping, etc. etc., it seems that there is no way to avoid the rope behind your foot thing. But I suggest you watch more experienced climbers and pay attention to what they do. You'll see that people do adjust the rope position, sometimes draping the rope over the knee, for example, to avoid it being stuck behind the ankle. it is easier to see than to explain in words.

Then you have to pay attention to it yourself, when climbing. Every step, you have to think about it, in addition to thinking about where you place your hands and feet, you have to keep in mind the direction of fall and the position of the rope, last clipped bolt, etc. etc. Mileage on easier terrain will help you, where you are not so gripped that you can't pay attention to the rope... No substitute for practice...

This is not a guarantee that you will never get a rope burn. Even experienced people occasionally make mistakes, and you are far from being experienced. But it will go a long way towards not getting a burn every time you fall.


jowybyo


Aug 29, 2012, 10:04 AM
Post #3 of 17 (3264 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 6, 2012
Posts: 20

Re: [lena_chita] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (3 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
Even experienced people occasionally make mistakes, and you are far from being experienced.

Sorry to hijack your thread Tempo but, it really irks me that so many people on this forum feel the need to take a jab at someones experience level. The attitude quite often is very stand-offish and arrogant on this website. It's really not needed. I can say that the general attitude on this forum towards newbies has prevented me from asking questions and learning from more experienced climbers.

I was always taught that there are no dumb questions. This mantra doesn't seem to apply at RC. Tempo asked a simple question; there was no need to state that "you are far from being experienced."

Tempo have you taken a sport climbing class at your local gym? They will go over techniques that Lena mentioned. Might be a go place to start before getting to the practice makes perfect suggestion.

-Joe B.


granite_grrl


Aug 29, 2012, 10:17 AM
Post #4 of 17 (3256 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2002
Posts: 14799

Re: [jowybyo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

There's nothing wrong with calling a duck a duck.

When learning to climb with the rope in the best spot it's nice to go out with a more experienced climber. It does take a lot of climbing time to keep the rope in the right place without thinking. While you're learning it's nice to have someone with experience watch you and give you little warnings ("dude, watch the rope, it's behind your leg").

Also, if you have a situation where you don't know how to position the rope you can ask the other person and hopefully get some useful feedback.


majid_sabet


Aug 29, 2012, 12:08 PM
Post #5 of 17 (3224 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 12, 2002
Posts: 8357

Re: [midtempo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

midtempo wrote:
I took my first lead falls this past weekend. On the first fall, I got a nasty rope burn injury and a resulting second- or first-degree burn. I would like to know if, during sport climbing, there is a way of climbing or managing the rope that would prevent this sort of injury from happening in the first place. I am guessing that there really isn't.


wear pants and problem solved


midtempo


Aug 29, 2012, 12:16 PM
Post #6 of 17 (3219 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 16, 2012
Posts: 9

Re: [granite_grrl] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (4 ratings)  
Can't Post

I don't take classes in climbing gyms. I feel foolish paying money for something I can get for free: cliffs and the great outdoors. I am primarily an outdoor climber and I learned how to lead sport by doing it informally at Rumney in New Hampshire. My first climbing partner when I started leading there was a 5.13 climber, so I got some good experience. But in the future, I will ask other bystanders at the bottom of crags about input about this issue, and I will watch them closely to see how they manage the rope as they climb up.

Concerning condescending attitude, this is a message forum after all. So I expect a certain amount of passive-aggressive responses and the like. It's the norm on the Interwebs. Even if the tone could use improvement, I feel honored that experienced climbers will give useful advice. Although I have noticed that many serious climbers are a cantankerous bunch.


(This post was edited by midtempo on Aug 29, 2012, 12:22 PM)


midtempo


Aug 29, 2012, 12:19 PM
Post #7 of 17 (3217 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 16, 2012
Posts: 9

Re: [majid_sabet] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
wear pants and problem solved

Yes, that occurred to me as well. Being literal here, that won't be quite enough. My injury was on my arm, not the leg. But yes, long shirt-sleeves and long pants.


majid_sabet


Aug 29, 2012, 12:28 PM
Post #8 of 17 (3207 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 12, 2002
Posts: 8357

Re: [midtempo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

midtempo wrote:
In reply to:
wear pants and problem solved

Yes, that occurred to me as well. Being literal here, that won't be quite enough. My injury was on my arm, not the leg. But yes, long shirt-sleeves and long pants.

also, always wear gloves when belaying.


dagibbs


Aug 29, 2012, 2:02 PM
Post #9 of 17 (3184 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 30, 2007
Posts: 887

Re: [midtempo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

People have given good advice on being aware of where the rope is, in relationship to where you are at all times, and modifying that. Another thing, if falling never grab for the rope. I've seen a couple nasty rope burns when the falling climber grabed for the other side of the rope, and had it (of course) run through their hands at speed.


csiebsen


Aug 30, 2012, 8:14 AM
Post #10 of 17 (3111 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 29, 2012
Posts: 53

Re: [midtempo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

midtempo wrote:
Although I have noticed that many serious climbers are a cantankerous bunch.

Noticed this myself, have come to terms with it and doesn't bother me much anymore. Taking a person with an overwhelming passion for being on the rock and locking them up in a cube behind a monitor is by definition, "cruel and unusual". Being kind of ornary, though not excusable, is understandable.Wink


markc


Aug 30, 2012, 10:01 AM
Post #11 of 17 (3083 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 21, 2003
Posts: 2475

Re: [midtempo] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Regardless of the tone of some of the comments, you've received some helpful feedback already. This may not be relevant depending on where you were when you fell, but belayer positioning could also be an issue. If you're relatively low on the route and the belayer isn't in a good location (such as too far from the base), there could be an increasingly taut line in your fall zone.

Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.


majid_sabet


Aug 30, 2012, 11:17 AM
Post #12 of 17 (3060 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 12, 2002
Posts: 8357

Re: [markc] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

markc wrote:
Regardless of the tone of some of the comments, you've received some helpful feedback already. This may not be relevant depending on where you were when you fell, but belayer positioning could also be an issue. If you're relatively low on the route and the belayer isn't in a good location (such as too far from the base), there could be an increasingly taut line in your fall zone.

Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.

what are the disadvantageous of wearing pants while climbing ?


markc


Aug 30, 2012, 11:41 AM
Post #13 of 17 (3052 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 21, 2003
Posts: 2475

Re: [majid_sabet] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.

what are the disadvantageous of wearing pants while climbing ?

I didn't expressly state there are disadvantages to wearing pants. I don't think there are disadvantages to seat belts 99.9% of the time, but I'd still advocate for accident prevention.

But since you asked, here are some potential disadvantages for pants: Pants could be too hot. If you wear pants that are nipped in at the cuff, you look goofy grabbing dinner after climbing. If you wear more normal pants and don't cuff them up, you might obscure your vision. Related to this topic, you can still get bruises and abrasions through the fabric.


majid_sabet


Aug 30, 2012, 12:37 PM
Post #14 of 17 (3023 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 12, 2002
Posts: 8357

Re: [markc] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

markc wrote:
majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.

what are the disadvantageous of wearing pants while climbing ?

I didn't expressly state there are disadvantages to wearing pants. I don't think there are disadvantages to seat belts 99.9% of the time, but I'd still advocate for accident prevention.

But since you asked, here are some potential disadvantages for pants: Pants could be too hot. If you wear pants that are nipped in at the cuff, you look goofy grabbing dinner after climbing. If you wear more normal pants and don't cuff them up, you might obscure your vision. Related to this topic, you can still get bruises and abrasions through the fabric.

I see more climbers with cuts and bruises wearing shorts then wearing pants


sbaclimber


Aug 30, 2012, 2:08 PM
Post #15 of 17 (3002 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 21, 2004
Posts: 3075

Re: [majid_sabet] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.

what are the disadvantageous of wearing pants while climbing ?

I didn't expressly state there are disadvantages to wearing pants. I don't think there are disadvantages to seat belts 99.9% of the time, but I'd still advocate for accident prevention.

But since you asked, here are some potential disadvantages for pants: Pants could be too hot. If you wear pants that are nipped in at the cuff, you look goofy grabbing dinner after climbing. If you wear more normal pants and don't cuff them up, you might obscure your vision. Related to this topic, you can still get bruises and abrasions through the fabric.

I see more climbers with cuts and bruises wearing shorts then wearing pants
So...!?
I get more scrapes and scabs when I crack climb without a tape-glove, but f-ed if I am going to spend 10-15min and 3m+ of tape to create a glove for a one-off single pitch of crack climbing to save me a bit of skin...Crazy
(plus, I find those scabs good reminders of how piss-poor my crack climbing technique has gotten...)


(This post was edited by sbaclimber on Aug 30, 2012, 2:10 PM)


shotwell


Aug 31, 2012, 1:17 AM
Post #16 of 17 (2951 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 5, 2009
Posts: 366

Re: [majid_sabet] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.

what are the disadvantageous of wearing pants while climbing ?

I didn't expressly state there are disadvantages to wearing pants. I don't think there are disadvantages to seat belts 99.9% of the time, but I'd still advocate for accident prevention.

But since you asked, here are some potential disadvantages for pants: Pants could be too hot. If you wear pants that are nipped in at the cuff, you look goofy grabbing dinner after climbing. If you wear more normal pants and don't cuff them up, you might obscure your vision. Related to this topic, you can still get bruises and abrasions through the fabric.

I see more climbers with cuts and bruises wearing shorts then wearing pants

This is logical, as you wouldn't see the injuries through the pants.


majid_sabet


Aug 31, 2012, 9:11 AM
Post #17 of 17 (2911 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 12, 2002
Posts: 8357

Re: [shotwell] Preventing a rope burn injury [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

shotwell wrote:
majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
majid_sabet wrote:
markc wrote:
Majid made the (hopefully tongue-in-cheek) comment to just "wear pants and problem solved." That's like suggesting that wearing a helmet is the solution to inverted falls. Awareness of your position relative to the rope mitigates much of this risk. Go with that rather than minimizing negative consequences from bad habits.

what are the disadvantageous of wearing pants while climbing ?

I didn't expressly state there are disadvantages to wearing pants. I don't think there are disadvantages to seat belts 99.9% of the time, but I'd still advocate for accident prevention.

But since you asked, here are some potential disadvantages for pants: Pants could be too hot. If you wear pants that are nipped in at the cuff, you look goofy grabbing dinner after climbing. If you wear more normal pants and don't cuff them up, you might obscure your vision. Related to this topic, you can still get bruises and abrasions through the fabric.

I see more climbers with cuts and bruises wearing shorts then wearing pants

This is logical, as you wouldn't see the injuries through the pants.


I am not talking about covering old wounds but rather, does wearing pants decreases cuts and bruises while climbing and ultimately, does it reduces rope burn injuries .


Forums : Climbing Information : Injury Treatment and Prevention

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook