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Access Here Threatened by NPS - Contact PATC
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johnely


Nov 15, 2012, 5:39 PM
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Access Here Threatened by NPS - Contact PATC  (North_America: United_States: Virginia: North_Western: Little_Stony_Man)
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There is one month starting 11/14/12 to get involved and stop this threat to access.
MadMadFrownMad Contact PATC or Access Fund and get involved!

Contact me (John Ely) for more info.
JohnDEly@gmail.com
2012
Impacts of Alternative B: Balance Between Natural Resource
Protection and Visitor Use (NPS Preferred Alternative)
Impact Analysis: Under Alternative B, climbing management would be implemented
through the proposed Climbing Management Guidelines. Most rock outcrop management
would rely on minimal management tactics like displays, internet and print information
and educational programs. North Marshall Summit and Marys Rock would be monitored
for climbing impacts and may have further restrictions or prohibitions imposed in the
future. Rock climbing access would be maintained for the majority of climbs, but low
National Park Service Rock Outcrop Management Plan
Shenandoah National Park Environmental Assessment/Assessment of Effect
Chapter 4: Environmental Consequences 112
barriers and signs would be installed on some access points and informal trail routes.
Running anchor ropes and webbing across the AT or other trials would be prohibited.
Climbing activities on cliff areas within 35 meters north of the “chute” trail all points
south and climbing activity in the area of large boulders on the northern most end of the
cliffs would be prohibited. Some improvements would be made to the “chute” trail. The
AT may be relocated to the existing Passamaquoddy Trail to help reduce visitor
congestion at upper cliffs. This action is contingent upon approval for simultaneous
relocation of the AT to its original path through the Skyland Resort development one
mile south of Little Stony Man Mountain. Anchor ropes and webbing that cross the AT or
other trails would be prohibited. Rock climbing access would be maintained to the
majority of climbs on the Little Stony Man Cliffs. The ability of rock climbers to use or
establish routes on the southern cliff or far northern boulders would be eliminated.
At Old Rag Mountain the western summit would be closed to visitation and a trail rerouted
and hardened to prevent trampling of the rare species Huperzia. Rock climbers
would encounter low barriers and signs on informal access trails and would encounter
short trail-re-routes, educational signs, and low barriers that direct them around rare plant
populations adjacent to climbing staging areas or trails.
Actions at Management Category 1 sites include restricting rock climbing and closing
informal trails at North Marshall. At South Marshall, use of the Appalachian Trail would
be re-routed away from the cliff and rock outcrops. At Overall Run Falls North informal
trails to outcrops would be closed. Visitor access would be focused at non-sensitive areas.
At Hawksbill Summit, rock and ice climbing would be prohibited and the multiple
informal trails to the cliffs between the Byrds Nest Shelter and the summit viewing
platform would be closed. Signage and physical barriers on the Frazier Discovery Trail at
Loft Mountain’s northern most summit outcrop would reduce use of the site, protecting
plant communities.
Actions at Management Category 2 sites include containing visitation at the overlook
outcrop and closing informal trails at Marys Rock. Off-trail rock scrambling in the lichen
community would be reduced at Blackrock South District.
For Management Category 3 and 4 sites, monitoring would be established. At Category 3
sites monitoring would be done to assess impacts of visitor use at Franklin Cliffs.
No climbing regulations would be implemented for sites in Management Category 5.
Adverse impacts to Little Stony Man Mountain would be minor and impacts to Old Rag
Mountain and sites in Management Categories 1 and 2 would be negligible. There would
be no impacts to Management Category 3-5 sites. There would also be beneficial impacts
from improvements to climbing facilities at Little Stony Man Mountain.
Overall, impacts to Climbing Activities would be negligible to minor with beneficial
impacts.
National Park Service Rock Outcrop Management Plan
Shenandoah National Park Environmental Assessment/Assessment of Effect
Chapter 4: Environmental Consequences 113
Cumulative Impacts: The Old Rag parking lot project would not impact climbing
activities associated with the rock outcrops nor are there any actions associated with the
project that would impact other climbing activities in the Park. Therefore, it would not
contribute to cumulative impacts to climbing activities; there are no cumulative impacts.
Conclusion: There would be adverse, site-specific minor, short-term impacts from the
installation of signs and barriers. Actions under Alternative B would result in adverse,
site-specific, negligible to minor, long-term impacts on climbing activities. There would
be beneficial impacts at Little Stony Man Mountain. There would be no cumulative impacts from past, present and reasonably foreseeable future actions.
2008
Impacts of Alternative B: Balance Between Natural Resource
Protection and Visitor Use (NPS Preferred Alternative)
Impact Analysis: Under Alternative B, climbing management would be implemented
through the proposed Climbing Management Guidelines. Most rock outcrop management
would rely on minimal management tactics like displays, internet and print information
and educational programs. North Marshall Summit and Marys Rock would be monitored
for climbing impacts and may have further restrictions or prohibitions imposed in the
future. Rock climbing access would be maintained for the majority of climbs, but low
barriers and signs would be installed on some access points and informal trail routes. Use
of tree anchors across the trail (presently the AT) would be prohibited.
At Little Stony Man Mountain fixed anchors would be allowed to be installed as
authorized by the Superintendent’s Office and not installed or maintained by the NPS,
and climbing access to some areas would be prohibited. Climbing activities on cliff areas
within 35 meters north of the “chute” trail all points south and climbing activity in the
area of large boulders on the northern most end of the cliffs would be prohibited. Some
improvements would be made to the “chute” trail. The AT may be relocated to the
existing Passamaquoddy Trail to help reduce visitor congestion at upper cliffs. This
action is contingent upon approval for simultaneous relocation of the AT to its original
path through the Skyland Resort development one mile south of Little Stony Man
Mountain. Anchor ropes and webbing that cross the trail would be prohibited. Rock
climbing access would be maintained to the majority of climbs on the Little Stony Man
Cliffs. Rock climbers would have access to installed fixed anchors, and a more stable and
safe return to the base of the cliffs using the “chute” trail. The ability of rock climbers to
use or establish routes on the southern cliff or far northern boulders will be eliminated.
Fixed anchors would be allowed to be installed as authorized by the Superintendent’s
Office and not installed or maintained by the NPS at the Little Stony Man Mountain
upper cliffs as a safe alternative to tree anchors or less experienced climbers not
comfortable with using rock anchors.
At Old Rag Mountain the western summit would be closed to visitation and a trail rerouted
and hardened to prevent trampling of the rare species Huperzia. Rock climbers
would encounter low barriers and signs on informal access trails and would encounter
short trail-re-routes, educational signs, and low barriers that direct them around rare plant
populations adjacent to climbing staging areas or trails.
Actions at Management Category 1 sites include restricting rock climbing and closing
informal trails at North Marshall. At South Marshall, use of the Appalachian Trail would
be re-routed away from the cliff and rock outcrops. At Overall Run Falls North informal
trails to outcrops would be closed. Visitor access would be focused at non-sensitive areas.
At Hawksbill Summit, rock and ice climbing would be prohibited and the multiple
informal trails to the cliffs between the Byrds Nest Shelter and the summit viewing
platform would be closed. Signage and physical barriers on the Frazier Discovery Trail at
Loft Mountain’s northern most summit outcrop would reduce use of the site, protecting
plant communities.
National Park Service Rock Outcrop Management Plan
Shenandoah National Park Environmental Assessment/Assessment of Effect
Chapter 4: Environmental Consequences 118
Actions at Management Category 2 sites include containing visitation at the overlook
outcrop and closing informal trails at Marys Rock. Off-trail rock scrambling in the lichen
community would be reduced at Blackrock South District.
For Management Category 3 and 4 sites, monitoring would be established. At Category 3
sites monitoring would be done to assess impacts of visitor use at Franklin Cliffs.
No climbing regulations would be implemented for sites in Management Category 5.
Adverse impacts to Little Stony Man Mountain would be minor and impacts to Old Rag
Mountain and sites in Management Categories 1 and 2 would be negligible. There would
be no impacts to Management Category 3-5 sites. There would also be beneficial impacts
from improvements to climbing facilities at Little Stony Man Mountain.
Overall, impacts to Climbing Activities would be negligible to minor with beneficial
impacts.
Cumulative Impacts: The Old Rag parking lot project would not impact climbing
activities associated with the rock outcrops nor are there any actions associated with the
project that would impact other climbing activities in the Park. Therefore, it would not
contribute to cumulative impacts to climbing activities; there are no cumulative impacts.
Conclusion: There would be adverse, site-specific minor, short-term impacts from the
installation of signs and barriers. Actions under Alternative B would result in adverse,
site-specific, negligible to minor, long-term impacts on climbing activities. There would
be beneficial impacts at Little Stony Man Mountain. There would be no cumulative
impacts from past, present and reasonably foreseeable future actions.


kikitastrophe


Nov 16, 2012, 8:45 AM
Post #2 of 3 (1159 views)
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Registered: Oct 19, 2009
Posts: 25

Re: [johnely] Access Here Threatened by NPS - Contact PATC [In reply to]
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This is a lot of words, can you make an executive summary so people don't ignore this very important issue? I might be confused, but this is what I was able to get out of your post:

1. They want to restrict climbing access
2. New rule to forbid Anchors/ropes from crossing the Appalachian Trail/Other Trails
3. They say they will "maintain access to the majority of climbs" at Little Stony Man
4. They want to forbid use/development of southern cliffs and northern boulders At Little Stony Man
5. Restrict access to Western Old Rag summit to protect Huperzia plants
6. Prohibit rock and ice climbing at Hawksbill Summit


marc801


Nov 16, 2012, 9:52 AM
Post #3 of 3 (1151 views)
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Registered: Aug 1, 2005
Posts: 2731

Re: [kikitastrophe] Access Here Threatened by NPS - Contact PATC [In reply to]
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kikitastrophe wrote:
This is a lot of words, can you make an executive summary so people don't ignore this very important issue?
+1
To the OP: TL;DR


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