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yanqui


Nov 21, 2012, 4:42 AM
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Registered: Feb 24, 2004
Posts: 1550

Not looking good
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I was fairly convinced no one would be doing anything significant about this problem and unfortunately I was right However, the bad news is still a bummer:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/...environment-20410942


Toast_in_the_Machine


Nov 21, 2012, 11:06 AM
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Registered: Sep 11, 2008
Posts: 5184

Re: [yanqui] Not looking good [In reply to]
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yanqui wrote:
I was fairly convinced no one would be doing anything significant about this problem and unfortunately I was right However, the bad news is still a bummer:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/...environment-20410942

Oh, fracking hell. I thought we were doing something:
http://www.economist.com/...on-dioxide-emissions

In reply to:
Thanks to the shale-gas bonanza, America now finds itself almost accidentally among the rich nations that have seen their carbon-dioxide emissions from electricity generation fall in recent years.


yanqui


Nov 21, 2012, 5:00 PM
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Registered: Feb 24, 2004
Posts: 1550

Re: [Toast_in_the_Machine] Not looking good [In reply to]
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Toast_in_the_Machine wrote:
yanqui wrote:
I was fairly convinced no one would be doing anything significant about this problem and unfortunately I was right However, the bad news is still a bummer:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/...environment-20410942

Oh, fracking hell. I thought we were doing something:
http://www.economist.com/...on-dioxide-emissions

In reply to:
Thanks to the shale-gas bonanza, America now finds itself almost accidentally among the rich nations that have seen their carbon-dioxide emissions from electricity generation fall in recent years.

Unfortunately, as the very same report by the IEA points out, the problem keeps getting worse anyway:

http://www.iea.org/...y/name,27216,en.html

I find it interesting to note that the actual IEA report attributes the short term changes in the US to "switching from coal to gas as well as the mild winter" and the overall changes come from "lower oil use in the transport sector (linked to efficiency improvements, higher oil prices and the economic downturn which has cut vehicle miles travelled) and a substantial shift from coal to gas". Thus fracking plays a role, but for some strange reason the other factors from the IEA report aren't mentioned in the Economistīs article ... a bias perhaps?

When it comes to fracking for gas it may certainly be less C0_2 intensive than burning coal, but it also comes with its own environmental costs. Just ask these guys:

http://stateimpact.npr.org/...water-contamination/

The good thing about this kind of contamination is at least it doesn't fuck over the rest of the world.


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