Forums: Climbing Information: Beginners:
Question for older climbers.
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Beginners

Premier Sponsor:

 
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


arcadiandj


Dec 15, 2012, 4:27 PM
Post #1 of 27 (5516 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 15, 2012
Posts: 2

Question for older climbers.
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Greetings:) I am 47 and am giving climbing a try for the first time since childhood. As an active person throughout my life, I want to start off right and prevent injuries. Do any of you more experienced climbers that are older have any words of wisdom for an older noob?


moose_droppings


Dec 15, 2012, 4:33 PM
Post #2 of 27 (5511 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 7, 2005
Posts: 3362

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

arcadiandj wrote:
Greetings:) I am 47 and am giving climbing a try for the first time since childhood. As an active person throughout my life, I want to start off right and prevent injuries. Do any of you more experienced climbers that are older have any words of wisdom for an older noob?

Find an experienced person to show you the ropes.
Don't get in a big hurry to advance through the grades, pace yourself with difficulty and learning. Safety is as much key to longevity as anything else.


edge


Dec 15, 2012, 5:16 PM
Post #3 of 27 (5476 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 14, 2003
Posts: 9118

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

Well I'm 51, but I started 36 years ago so I have no words of advice on starting later. In fact, I have no real basis for speaking as an "older" climber either. For what it's worth:

1. Get proper instruction. Pay attention, ask questions, make sure you understand the concepts and reasoning behind safety, technique, and ethics. Gyms are great for this; ask around first to find the best instructors.

2. Challenge yourself mentally, but ease into the physical progress slow and steady. Climbing can be a lifetime pursuit, so approach it like a marathon, not a sprint. Tendons strengthen over time, and heal slowly. Think mileage over difficulty at first.

3. Don't skimp on gear. Buy the best that you can afford, and try on any soft goods like harnesses or shoes before purchasing. If you can demo these first, so much the better.

4. Begin with comfy but snug, economical shoes. Focus on footwork. I used to teach kids to have "quiet feet" by putting jingle bells on elastics over their instep. Try to climb without hearing them. Goofy, but effective.

5. Watch the better climbers, and see how and why they position themselves for different moves. Try these techniques yourself bouldering and/or traversing.

6. Listen to your body. If your tendons or muscles need a break, which will happen often at first, then take a break. Use this time to read, practice knots, or work general fitness.

7. Climb with younger, more experienced partners. If not chronologically younger, then younger by attitude and approach. They will push you and keep you stoked.

8. Never use the words extreme, brah, or can't. Are you old enough to remember Gumby?

9. DO NOT wear socks in your shoes or clip your chalk bag to your harness with a toy carabiner. See #8 above.

10. Never take anything you read on the web as gospel, this post included.

Good luck, have fun, and be safe.


potreroed


Dec 15, 2012, 6:43 PM
Post #4 of 27 (5386 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 30, 2001
Posts: 1454

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

I know several climbers who started in their 40's and are solid 5.11 climbers in their 60's

Climb outdoors as much as possible and build a good base at each grade before pushing into a higher grade.

Have fun!!


Syd


Dec 15, 2012, 6:46 PM
Post #5 of 27 (5385 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2012
Posts: 300

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

arcadiandj wrote:
I want to start off right and prevent injuries.

"Edge" has made some good points. I started at 48, 16 years ago.
It is almost impossible to injure yourself unless you lead, then it's almost a certainty if you climb long enough. Hence, I'd suggest sticking to top rope for some years until you have picked up plenty of experience.
The other major type of injury is finger injury, most commonly from crimping. Just avoid crimping as much as possible. Even hangboard manufacturers recommend you don't crimp. Shoulder injury also seems fairly common, but it will be quite a while before you're doing the sort of moves that might cause it.
If you follow the above, the biggest risks are with ticks and snakes. Even the latter can be minimised by climbing at shady summer crags.


shockabuku


Dec 15, 2012, 8:08 PM
Post #6 of 27 (5361 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 20, 2006
Posts: 4867

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Don't campus. Don't dyno until you've been climbing for a while and your hands and arms have adapted. When your elbows start to feel sore, tone down the intensity and/or take a break for a few days. Focus on technique (maybe by watching other people or doing some drills) not strength. Stay away from the pull-ups. I'm 45, everyone I know my age and older has at least occasional trouble with their elbows.

I wouldn't recommend staying away from leading. Injury from lead climbing isn't an age related issue it's a knowledge and experience (and some luck) issue. Lead when you feel ready to lead; otherwise you'll cheat yourself out of one of the best reasons to climb.


(This post was edited by shockabuku on Dec 15, 2012, 8:12 PM)


marc801


Dec 16, 2012, 7:54 AM
Post #7 of 27 (5264 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 1, 2005
Posts: 2770

Re: [edge] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
Edge's 10 tips
Actually these are excellent tips for any age new climber (with the probable exception of#7 for younger climbers).


bearbreeder


Dec 16, 2012, 11:16 AM
Post #8 of 27 (5237 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 1, 2009
Posts: 1960

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (4 ratings)  
Can't Post

if you want to climb harder ... climb with hawt gurls 1/2 your age ... that might also get you injured too ...

but it sure is more fun Tongue


arcadiandj


Dec 16, 2012, 6:39 PM
Post #9 of 27 (5162 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 15, 2012
Posts: 2

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Thank you everyone for your very helpful responses.


fitzontherocks


Dec 16, 2012, 8:19 PM
Post #10 of 27 (5139 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 11, 2003
Posts: 858

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I'm 53-- started climbing at 40. While I agree "the best exercise for climbing is climbing," that's not always possible. I go to the (exercise) gym about 3X a week and work on general fitness. A couple of more climbing-centered exercises are finger curls, pullups and sit ups and planks for the core. Some will say it's not necessary but it works for me and I think contributes to my pretty injury-free climbing career. I feel it in my fingers more now than I used to. Take ibuprofen after every climb. Can still lead 10s and easy 11s outdoors and more important... I have fun on 7s and 8s, too. Start out easy. Do easy routes over and over til you get them wired and build your confidence and skills. And if you're in Arkansas, hit me up. If I can get out of the old folks home, I'll rope up with you :)


Syd


Dec 17, 2012, 1:55 AM
Post #11 of 27 (5115 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2012
Posts: 300

Re: [shockabuku] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

shockabuku wrote:
Don't campus. Don't dyno until you've been climbing for a while and your hands and arms have adapted.

I agree. Dynos are a great way to injure yourself, even after conditioning, but dynamic moves are great and essential on most harder routes.

In reply to:
Stay away from the pull-ups.

I also avoid chin ups because I found they were causing tennis elbow. I was able to do 37 a few years back but found it didn't help my climbing. However, training on my hangboard with smaller movements or static hangs and lifts has given dramatic improvements.

In reply to:
I wouldn't recommend staying away from leading. Injury from lead climbing isn't an age related issue it's a knowledge and experience (and some luck) issue. Lead when you feel ready to lead; otherwise you'll cheat yourself out of one of the best reasons to climb.

Leading should not be the main reason to climb, unless you're some sort of macho man trying to impress. I've seen a great number of young blokes enthusiastically get into leading; scare themselves silly; then drop out of climbing altogether. I climbed indoors TR for 10 years before my first outdoor climb. I absolutely loved indoors but now I love outdoor climbing even more. If you are leading slabs and vertical walls, at some point you will seriously injure yourself. Once you are an excellent climber and climbing mainly overhangs, you will find leading much safer.


bearbreeder


Dec 17, 2012, 3:02 AM
Post #12 of 27 (5106 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 1, 2009
Posts: 1960

Re: [Syd] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

Syd wrote:
Leading should not be the main reason to climb, unless you're some sort of macho man trying to impress. I've seen a great number of young blokes enthusiastically get into leading; scare themselves silly; then drop out of climbing altogether. I climbed indoors TR for 10 years before my first outdoor climb. I absolutely loved indoors but now I love outdoor climbing even more. If you are leading slabs and vertical walls, at some point you will seriously injure yourself. Once you are an excellent climber and climbing mainly overhangs, you will find leading much safer.

funny ... the people i know lead just fine without 10 years of being a toppu roperu tofu guy ...

if you dont want to lead its yr call ... just realize yr dependent upon others in the many places that dont have a TR access ...

i guess you dont want to do much multipitch ... because you NEED to lead ... unless youre always trying to beg a rope gun to always drag you up because you dont have the ability to get on the sharp end ... and even then many partners want someone who can lead some of the pitches

and yr simply projecting your own fears upon the tons of other people who DO lead safely because of your own insecurities when you tell em not to lead

Wink


(This post was edited by bearbreeder on Dec 17, 2012, 3:10 AM)


granite_grrl


Dec 17, 2012, 5:17 AM
Post #13 of 27 (5082 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2002
Posts: 14903

Re: [bearbreeder] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

bearbreeder wrote:
Syd wrote:
Leading should not be the main reason to climb, unless you're some sort of macho man trying to impress. I've seen a great number of young blokes enthusiastically get into leading; scare themselves silly; then drop out of climbing altogether. I climbed indoors TR for 10 years before my first outdoor climb. I absolutely loved indoors but now I love outdoor climbing even more. If you are leading slabs and vertical walls, at some point you will seriously injure yourself. Once you are an excellent climber and climbing mainly overhangs, you will find leading much safer.

funny ... the people i know lead just fine without 10 years of being a toppu roperu tofu guy ...

if you dont want to lead its yr call ... just realize yr dependent upon others in the many places that dont have a TR access ...

i guess you dont want to do much multipitch ... because you NEED to lead ... unless youre always trying to beg a rope gun to always drag you up because you dont have the ability to get on the sharp end ... and even then many partners want someone who can lead some of the pitches

and yr simply projecting your own fears upon the tons of other people who DO lead safely because of your own insecurities when you tell em not to lead

Wink


I think Syd's comments were mostly based on this:
In reply to:
otherwise you'll cheat yourself out of one of the best reasons to climb

You know, I'll say that the majority of the time I'd rather lead, but I also love TRing sometimes too. Telling someone that they have insecurities because they weren't into leading isn't cool. It sucks when you feel like you have to do something you don’t enjoy because someone like you is judging them.

My suggestion to the OP, not as someone who is particularly old but as someone who has been climbing for a while and has had to come back from pretty major injury: Just start by getting out and getting a base of movement. Ignore this whole conversation on leading at the moment, it’s moot. You'll figure out if this is something you're interested on your own without people on the internet telling you one thing or another. Try to work on movement at first, getting volume at easier grades. This will also help ease your tendons and joints into the process.

Also, if you’re having fun ignore if the “cool” kids think you should be doing something different. There’s no room for ego in climbing.


bearbreeder


Dec 17, 2012, 5:31 AM
Post #14 of 27 (5075 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 1, 2009
Posts: 1960

Re: [granite_grrl] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

granite_grrl wrote:

You know, I'll say that the majority of the time I'd rather lead, but I also love TRing sometimes too. Telling someone that they have insecurities because they weren't into leading isn't cool. It sucks when you feel like you have to do something you don’t enjoy because someone like you is judging them.
.

telling peole they shouldnt lead because they are "some sort of macho man trying to impress" and that "If you are leading slabs and vertical walls, at some point you will seriously injure yourself."

ABSOLUTELY isnt cool or true ... or otherwise everyone i know would be a "macho man" (how about women) or seriously injured ...

people can TR all they want ... its when they go on the intrawebs and project their fears unto others about their own insecurities ... about something that thousands of climbers do safely ...

now thats REAL COOL Tongue


Syd


Dec 17, 2012, 1:10 PM
Post #15 of 27 (4968 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 25, 2012
Posts: 300

Re: [bearbreeder] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

bearbreeder wrote:
telling peole they shouldnt lead

Read the opening request:

arcadiandj wrote:
Greetings:) I am 47 and am giving climbing a try for the first time since childhood. As an active person throughout my life, I want to start off right and prevent injuries. Do any of you more experienced climbers that are older have any words of wisdom for an older noob?

"I want to start off right and prevent injuries."

You may enjoy leading but it is a way to guarantee injuries rather than prevent them.


bearbreeder


Dec 17, 2012, 1:20 PM
Post #16 of 27 (4962 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 1, 2009
Posts: 1960

Re: [Syd] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

Syd wrote:

You may enjoy leading but it is a way to guarantee injuries rather than prevent them.

i really dont think theres anymore that needs to be said ... as i guess the thousands if not more climbers leading every day are "guaranteed" to be injured

there are many things in climbing that will get you injured, leading responsibly aint one of the things that will "guarantee" it ... ive seen more injuries personally from bouldering than anything else

but then i try not to project my fear on others to overcome my weakness

Tongue


njrox


Dec 17, 2012, 1:26 PM
Post #17 of 27 (4956 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 12, 2011
Posts: 251

Re: [edge] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

edge wrote:
8. Never use the words extreme, brah, or can't. Are you old enough to remember Gumby?

9. DO NOT wear socks in your shoes or clip your chalk bag to your harness with a toy carabiner. See #8 above.

10. Never take anything you read on the web as gospel, this post included.

I strongly disagree with #8, brah.

I also disagree with #9 on two points. I've worn socks on cold days (bright white ones too, so eat it brah) and I clip my nut tool to my harness with a toy biner.

The rest, including #10 is pretty solid.


jorgegonzalez


Dec 17, 2012, 1:33 PM
Post #18 of 27 (4949 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 17, 2005
Posts: 140

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

I'm 57 and have quit numerous times, to no avail. Such is life!

But my advice to you is the same as for anyone new to climbing. Take it easy and work your way through the grades. Climb for yourself and emphasize enjoyment of the experience and not the competitive, trying to impress your friends aspect. Remember, gain elevation with your feet, steep and overhanging climbs require superior arm strength, which we don't have in abundance anymore.

In that vein, I prefer slab and cracks to face climbs. Thin finger holds are murder on us, my hands hurt for days sometimes and finger pulls require months to heal.

It helps to know where you climb. I personally prefer the Alabama Hills in the Eastern Sierras because the 5.8s and 9s are supreme, and with a little warm-up I'll hit the occasional 5.10, without having to walk for miles or grunt up steep gullies.

It's ironic, but after chasing the numbers for years I've resorted to going back to my favorite areas, particularly Joshua Tree, and discovering all these great 5.8-5.9 climbs that I overlooked before. Found a lot of gems.


healyje


Dec 17, 2012, 2:28 PM
Post #19 of 27 (4925 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 22, 2004
Posts: 4199

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

I took up golf very briefly in my early 50s and asked a golf pro what was the single best thing I could do to learn the game. He replied, "start young."

That said, skip the numbers, ignore the difficulty, skip the colored tape, and don't buy into the universal delusion you need painfully tight shoes or chalk. Climb outdoors as often as possible and just enjoy yourself.


marc801


Dec 17, 2012, 3:39 PM
Post #20 of 27 (4899 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 1, 2005
Posts: 2770

Re: [njrox] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

njrox wrote:
edge wrote:
8. Never use the words extreme, brah, or can't. Are you old enough to remember Gumby?

9. DO NOT wear socks in your shoes or clip your chalk bag to your harness with a toy carabiner. See #8 above.

10. Never take anything you read on the web as gospel, this post included.

I strongly disagree with #8, brah.
So you like addressing someone as an article of women's clothing?
Wait. What?


edge


Dec 17, 2012, 4:31 PM
Post #21 of 27 (4881 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 14, 2003
Posts: 9118

Re: [njrox] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

njrox wrote:
edge wrote:
8. Never use the words extreme, brah, or can't. Are you old enough to remember Gumby?

9. DO NOT wear socks in your shoes or clip your chalk bag to your harness with a toy carabiner. See #8 above.

10. Never take anything you read on the web as gospel, this post included.

I strongly disagree with #8, brah.

I also disagree with #9 on two points. I've worn socks on cold days (bright white ones too, so eat it brah) and I clip my nut tool to my harness with a toy biner.

Well, given your location, you may be in a Regionalized Exception Zone. Most other places this sort of thing makes you look like a dork.


gunkiemike


Dec 17, 2012, 4:40 PM
Post #22 of 27 (4873 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 1, 2002
Posts: 2265

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Lots of good stuff here, esp. from edge. But just to re-emphasize a few points: climb whatever style (lead, TR, boulder) makes you happy. Don't chase big numbers. Unless doing so is really what makes you happy, then do so VERY carefully - working the same problems over and over is a great way to tweak something. Work on getting smart about the sport as much as you work on getting fit/flexible/strong. Do lots of core strength exercises. Be careful about who you rope up with. Don't damage your feet with too-small shoes. Be kind to people at the crag.


njrox


Dec 17, 2012, 6:29 PM
Post #23 of 27 (4842 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 12, 2011
Posts: 251

Re: [edge] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

edge wrote:
njrox wrote:
edge wrote:
8. Never use the words extreme, brah, or can't. Are you old enough to remember Gumby?

9. DO NOT wear socks in your shoes or clip your chalk bag to your harness with a toy carabiner. See #8 above.

10. Never take anything you read on the web as gospel, this post included.

I strongly disagree with #8, brah.

I also disagree with #9 on two points. I've worn socks on cold days (bright white ones too, so eat it brah) and I clip my nut tool to my harness with a toy biner.

Well, given your location, you may be in a Regionalized Exception Zone. Most other places this sort of thing makes you look like a dork.

Calf length white tube socks with red and blue stripes at the top carrying a full rack of hexes on the approach trail racked on a plastic Field and Stream keychain biner, broseph.


shockabuku


Dec 17, 2012, 8:21 PM
Post #24 of 27 (4817 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 20, 2006
Posts: 4867

Re: [granite_grrl] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

granite_grrl wrote:
bearbreeder wrote:
Syd wrote:
Leading should not be the main reason to climb, unless you're some sort of macho man trying to impress. I've seen a great number of young blokes enthusiastically get into leading; scare themselves silly; then drop out of climbing altogether. I climbed indoors TR for 10 years before my first outdoor climb. I absolutely loved indoors but now I love outdoor climbing even more. If you are leading slabs and vertical walls, at some point you will seriously injure yourself. Once you are an excellent climber and climbing mainly overhangs, you will find leading much safer.

funny ... the people i know lead just fine without 10 years of being a toppu roperu tofu guy ...

if you dont want to lead its yr call ... just realize yr dependent upon others in the many places that dont have a TR access ...

i guess you dont want to do much multipitch ... because you NEED to lead ... unless youre always trying to beg a rope gun to always drag you up because you dont have the ability to get on the sharp end ... and even then many partners want someone who can lead some of the pitches

and yr simply projecting your own fears upon the tons of other people who DO lead safely because of your own insecurities when you tell em not to lead

Wink


I think Syd's comments were mostly based on this:
In reply to:
otherwise you'll cheat yourself out of one of the best reasons to climb

You know, I'll say that the majority of the time I'd rather lead, but I also love TRing sometimes too. Telling someone that they have insecurities because they weren't into leading isn't cool. It sucks when you feel like you have to do something you don’t enjoy because someone like you is judging them.

My suggestion to the OP, not as someone who is particularly old but as someone who has been climbing for a while and has had to come back from pretty major injury: Just start by getting out and getting a base of movement. Ignore this whole conversation on leading at the moment, it’s moot. You'll figure out if this is something you're interested on your own without people on the internet telling you one thing or another. Try to work on movement at first, getting volume at easier grades. This will also help ease your tendons and joints into the process.

Also, if you’re having fun ignore if the “cool” kids think you should be doing something different. There’s no room for ego in climbing.

I think you all may have missed a pretty important part of my argument:
shockabuku wrote:
Lead when you feel ready to lead; otherwise you'll cheat yourself out of one of the best reasons to climb.

Climbing is pretty much about self responsibility and deciding how much risk you're willing to accept. That's one of the best parts of it (for me).


Toast_in_the_Machine


Dec 23, 2012, 7:36 PM
Post #25 of 27 (4473 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 11, 2008
Posts: 5184

Re: [arcadiandj] Question for older climbers. [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Leverage your strengths, minimize your weaknesses.

If you have disposable income that a dirtbag climber just out of college doesn't have, feel free to use it.

If it takes you longer to recover from a hard training session than it did 10 year ago (actually for me it is harder to recover from a lost night of sleep), then plan on taking a little more time.

I know I'm not breaking any news, but you are not likely to be at the top of 8a.nu. But no big deal, you probably didn't want to get there anyways. Go to where you want to go and enjoy the journey.

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Forums : Climbing Information : Beginners

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook