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nick97


Sep 19, 2012, 6:30 PM
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Bouldering Progression
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Ive been climbing V4's for quite a while now. Like 3 months and I can't seem to progress into the 5's. I climb 5.11c though so I should be climbing V5. Im a tall guy and a lot of V5s are overhung (my weakness). Should I be climbing more 4's and 3's and trying a five every now and then or just projecting v5's? Any tips on technique too for a taller guy?


mleogrande


Sep 19, 2012, 7:23 PM
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Re: [nick97] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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Projecting can be strenuous. The more years you've been climbing, the more projecting your body can tolerate. If your just starting off, I would only project maybe once a week, whereas, some experienced climbers may project with greater frequency.

The grade of V4 is where I find that a lot of people stop progressing or progression slows down. There can be many reasons why.

1) Lack of core strength
2) Lack of technique
3) Not taking time off to heal the body, fingers, and allow for muscle growth/strengthening
4) Not training smart for results wanted

You should evaluate these things, and even ask an experienced climber to give his/her opinion of you. Keep in mind that everytime you improve a grade, that the next grade is even more difficult to obtain. People usually progress fast at first. But this pace is not sustainable.

The sport of bouldering is very complex. Knowing how to train, and how to send hard problems takes time and experience. Surround yourself with experienced and positive people.

Whenever I notch up a grade, it's after tampering my training, or a few weeks after a long rest when I get back into the flow. Good luck. I hope you get some good responses here that help you.


sunam


Dec 29, 2012, 4:04 PM
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Re: [nick97] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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I have been climbing for a short amount of time but have had great success due a couple of training techniques I found online which I will share with you.(I cannot give advice to being a tall climber as I am short but all tips I give should be able to help you.)

#1 working on foot work, the best way that I found to do this was with a single drill. You are going to want to do this on problems that are not easy but well within your ability level. As you climb your goal is to make absolutely no noise with your feet. You also want to make sure that you are placing your foot effectively on first touch, so as soon as your foot meets the hold you don't move it or reposition it. This will force you to pay attention to where and how you are placing your feet, it will make you overall a more controlled climber as well as a climber that doesn't just pull themselves up the wall with their arms(it saves a lot of energy giving you more time on the wall in increase in skill that much faster).

#2 controlling your body/weight and understanding your center of gravity. The way in which I found was best to do this was again on problems that are not to hard(also make sure it isn't a very dynamic climb). As you climb you want to hover over a hold with your hand for 3 seconds before grabbing onto it, this might seem strange but what it will do for you is engage all the support muscles in your body big time. It will also force you to make every move very balanced(for quite a while I did this and it completely changed my foot work, where I put my feet, where I planned to put them before I was even on the wall everything).

#3 get on problems that are 2 grades ahead of your ability, pick 2 or 3 with different styles/types of holds and work your but off to do as many moves on them as possible. This will not only give you confidence after getting moves you didn't think you could make but will also help you build strength. I would suggest doing this only once a week to give your body good enough rest between pushing it and for only about a hour when fresh.

I put these in order of importance, first learn how to place your feet then learn where to put them lastly get the physical strength for harder problems. The reason for this is that most climbers I have seen and I was guilty of this as well have the strength for harder problems but lack the technique. Most people I have talked to have increased 2 or 3 grades by just improving their foot work, which tips 1 and 2 will help you do. Also these tips are useful at any climbing level as the will always help improve your technique and strength if you are doing them on the appropriate grades.

I climb 3 times a week all 3 days I do the first 2 tips for at least part of the time I spend climbing if not all some days, and the 3rd I do 1 to 2 times a week depending on how I feel. Using these 3 tips I have ben able to progress very quickly from climbing at a v2 level to now climbing at a v6-7 level without hitting a plateau(though I am at one now)

I hope these tips are found to be helpful and good luck crushing!


spiderman5


Dec 29, 2012, 4:17 PM
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Re: [sunam] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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all the things sunam mentioned are spot on. The thing that has helped me to progress is to continue to push myself to take harder routes while mixing in manageable routes to practice technique on.


koolmoedee


Jan 3, 2013, 12:28 AM
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Re: [nick97] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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Don't take the following as gospel, but here's how I made my progression:

Project individual moves on stuff that's considerably harder than you can climb. For you that probably means V5, V6, V7.

Ask for lots of beta from people for each move, and work individual moves until you can do them. Take pride in each move you successfully project.

This will force you to learn a variety of hard moves, and hone the techniques and little adjustments that separate success from failure.

You'll have plenty of time to climb 3s and 4s when you warm up and cool down. When you do them,focus on using good, crisp technique.

---------

As for your height and overhangs, core strength is a critical weak point for taller climbers. If you cross train, focus on lower back especially, but also abs, glutes, and hamstrings. At the gym, try starting with inverted rows, progress to one-arm inverted rows, then one-arm/one-leg rows, then with weights added.

Like this, but with your legs straight:
http://tinyurl.com/aj8ofsb

When climbing, focus on maintaining good body tension: drive your hips forward towards the wall with your torso straight as a board. Bend your knees to keep your centre of gravity low. On overhanging problems, you will often want to drive your knees forward so you weight is on top of your feet instead of behind them.

One way to train your body tension is to climb easy overhangs while keeping your entire torso - from hips to shoulders - within 4 inches of the wall.

Good luck.


hyhuu


Jan 3, 2013, 9:29 AM
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Re: [nick97] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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nick97 wrote:
I climb 5.11c though so I should be climbing V5.

Would you be surprised to know that there are people who can climb 5.11c but can't boulder V5 and vice versa? One is not neccessary indicative of the other.


crackmeup


Jan 3, 2013, 11:45 AM
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Re: [hyhuu] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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hyhuu wrote:
nick97 wrote:
I climb 5.11c though so I should be climbing V5.

Would you be surprised to know that there are people who can climb 5.11c but can't boulder V5 and vice versa? One is not neccessary indicative of the other.

In fact, most 5.11c routes at gyms contain no moves harder than v2 (maybe an occasional v3). Outdoors, I know many people who climbed their first 5.12a before their first v5.


koolmoedee


Jan 3, 2013, 3:21 PM
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Re: [crackmeup] Bouldering Progression [In reply to]
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crackmeup wrote:
hyhuu wrote:
nick97 wrote:
I climb 5.11c though so I should be climbing V5.

Would you be surprised to know that there are people who can climb 5.11c but can't boulder V5 and vice versa? One is not neccessary indicative of the other.

In fact, most 5.11c routes at gyms contain no moves harder than v2 (maybe an occasional v3). Outdoors, I know many people who climbed their first 5.12a before their first v5.

A route with a V4 move as its hardest move would be 5.12a.

There's a 5.12a sport climb in Squamish that's basically 5.10a start with a V4 crux and a V3/5.11c finish.

Indoors, setters usually try to make routes more consistent, so 5.11c indoors would most likely be V2/occasional V3.

Personally, I find V4 considerably easier than 5.12a because I have no endurance.


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