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Terrorism and the public imagination
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Kartessa


May 13, 2013, 11:32 AM
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Terrorism and the public imagination
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An excellent article:
http://gawker.com/...magination-504465287


Gmburns2000


May 14, 2013, 5:50 PM
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Re: [Kartessa] Terrorism and the public imagination [In reply to]
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Kartessa wrote:
An excellent article:
http://gawker.com/...magination-504465287

yup. thanks for sharing.


notapplicable


May 15, 2013, 8:33 PM
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Re: [Kartessa] Terrorism and the public imagination [In reply to]
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"How do you make a terrorist? You just label him a terrorist. You move your attention away from the things that actually matter in your life, and you focus it on The Terror. You participate in becoming terrorized. You allow a small sliver of violent people to warp your entire society's perspective on reality. And you eventually arrive at a place where it seems perfectly reasonable to forget about children being shot at a Mother's Day party, because our leaders and our media and our minds are still occupied with Muslims with pressure cookers.
There will be more terrorism, because terrorism works. The American imagination can't seem to get enough of it.
"

^Truth^

At a cultural level, we have become something of a bubble boy. But wasn't that the idea all along?


(This post was edited by notapplicable on May 15, 2013, 8:35 PM)


Partner cracklover


Jun 4, 2013, 1:07 PM
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Re: [Kartessa] Terrorism and the public imagination [In reply to]
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Kartessa wrote:
An excellent article:
http://gawker.com/...magination-504465287

What I liked most about Obama's big speech a couple weeks ago was that his real message seemed to be: "Let's think about wrapping up the War On Terror and begin to move on".

I have believed for a long time that enshrining the concept of terrorism in our legal system is a terrible mistake that adds nothing productive and creates all kinds of problems. I would like to see it absolutely abolished.

You murder people, you get charged with murder. You rally a group of people to murder people - the bunch of you get charged with murder, accessory, aid and abetting, etc. Does anybody think that Charles Manson got off easy because we didn't have "terrorism" back then?

Now we have the mess that is Guantanamo Bay, we have the legacy of the US participating in torture, and in extra-judicial transportation to countries where our "enemies" can be disappeared, we have targeted executions of US citizens abroad administered not by the legal branch but by the executive branch. It's a fucking mess. Just throw the whole thing out. Use the existing real legal constructs

And when the bad guys are hiding out in places with no effective government, or a government that doesn't like us? I say "Oh well." It's not the end of the world if people out there hate us and snipe at us from time to time. I'm not against targeted military attacks when appropriate, if they get too strong. But other than that, whatever. Ignore them.

GO


scrapedape


Jun 5, 2013, 1:51 PM
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Re: [cracklover] Terrorism and the public imagination [In reply to]
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Related:

http://themonkeycage.org/...g-terrorism-matters/

Basic argument: popular discourse applies the terrorism label too freely, obscuring important nuances with implications for how we deal with violence.

In reply to:
Despite intra-field debate, most North American scholars adopt the three-prong definition of terrorism: it is politically motivated, perpetrated by non-state actors like lone wolves or organizations, and targets civilians rather than the military. This means that when a government attacks civilians like in Assad’s Syria, when the perpetrators are motivated by pecuniary gain like on the streets of Detroit, or when they target military assets like the USS Cole, academic purists would distinguish such acts of violence from terrorism.

When it comes to defining terrorism, motives therefore matter. Mass shootings—like the one in Tucson by Jared Loughner, the one in the Aurora movie theater by James Holmes, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting by Adam Lanza, or the New Orleans Mother’s Day shooting—would be treated as something else. Some scholars provide no distinction between rampage violence and terrorist acts. But in reality, there is an important difference—rampage shooters are not politically motivated.


tylerpinnacle


Sep 1, 2013, 4:58 AM
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Kartessa


Sep 4, 2013, 12:04 PM
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Re: [tylerpinnacle] Terrorism and the public imagination [In reply to]
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tylerpinnacle wrote:
First the shooting in sandy hook and then the bombing in boston and now the mothers day shooting is really just stupid what do they think that they will acomplish by shooting each other and other stupid stuff

Are you high?


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