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tpcollins


Dec 30, 2013, 7:35 AM
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My last question . . .
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Are there certain line brands or types of line that are more suitable to work better with a prusik loop than others? The technical terms are a bit confusing with their various "coatings", etc., I'd just like to know which ones grip the best immediately with minimal slippage? Thanks.


lena_chita
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Dec 30, 2013, 7:46 AM
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Re: [tpcollins] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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tpcollins wrote:
Are there certain line brands or types of line that are more suitable to work better with a prusik loop than others? The technical terms are a bit confusing with their various "coatings", etc., I'd just like to know which ones grip the best immediately with minimal slippage? Thanks.

It is not a straightforward answer because it depends on other things in the system, such as the diameter of the rope onto which you are tying your prussic, vs. the diameter of the prussic cord, the number of wraps you put into your prusik, etc.

It sounds like you need something like this:

http://www.allhandsfire.com/...Kj2LsCFc6TfgodLRwA2g

or this:

http://www.campmor.com/...i_gpa=pla&ci_kw=

pre-tied or sewn, versatile enough...


tpcollins


Dec 30, 2013, 7:55 AM
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Re: [lena_chita] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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Thanks lena_chita - my bad, I need to rephrase my question:

What type of standing line provides the most grip when a prusik loop is attached to it - not the prusik itself?

But the links to those prussic looks are great, thanks.


hobo_climber


Dec 30, 2013, 12:21 PM
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Re: [tpcollins] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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Even with your question rephrased Lena's answer is still the most applicable.

"It is not a straightforward answer because it depends on other things in the system, such as the diameter of the rope onto which you are tying your prussic, vs. the diameter of the prussic cord, the number of wraps you put into your prusik, etc."

The variables mentioned have a far greater impact on the 'gripping' power of a Prussic than the 'coating' on your rope.

But to add another variable to the mix, any brand spanking new rope, especially static rope (which I'm assuming your planning on using) will be a great deal slicker than any used rope, and you'll have to be a lot more careful to make sure your Prussic will grip.


rocknice2


Dec 30, 2013, 12:29 PM
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Re: [tpcollins] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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Your seriously over thinking this or trying to do it on a minimalist budget.
Once you have your high hide, anchor a rope above where you are going to stand. Drop the rope to he ground and attach a weight to it so it's easier to go up. Buy a GriGri and use that to secure your upward climb and you can use it to decend as well. You obviously got up the tree somehow to establish the hide so there is no reason to climb a rope up. When in the hide stay attached to the GriGri and tie a backup knot just incase. The GG will allow you to adjust the lenght of rope easily. There is no need to have a ton of slack out with this system and that solves your falling below a limb and any huge fall factor issues.

Seriously stay away from prussics and trying to climb up a rope. I don't see any reason for climb one since you need to establish an anchor without one to begin with. This is not the cheapst way to do it but is far simpler choice. Don't end up as bear fodder or worse a grizzly pinata.


petsfed


Dec 30, 2013, 12:42 PM
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Re: [rocknice2] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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rocknice2 wrote:
Once you have your high hide, anchor a rope above where you are going to stand. Drop the rope to he ground and attach a weight to it so it's easier to go up. Buy a GriGri and use that to secure your upward climb and you can use it to decend as well. You obviously got up the tree somehow to establish the hide so there is no reason to climb a rope up. When in the hide stay attached to the GriGri and tie a backup knot just incase. The GG will allow you to adjust the lenght of rope easily. There is no need to have a ton of slack out with this system and that solves your falling below a limb and any huge fall factor issues.

If the point is to arrest falls, rather than climb the rope, then it should be clarified that a dynamic rope is your best option, rather than a static rope. Falling on the static rope, from any height, will land you on the continuum of suck, with minor kidney pain on one side, and total anchor failure on the other. Get a dynamic rope.


tpcollins


Dec 30, 2013, 1:53 PM
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Re: [petsfed] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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petsfed wrote:

If the point is to arrest falls, rather than climb the rope, then it should be clarified that a dynamic rope is your best option, rather than a static rope. Falling on the static rope, from any height, will land you on the continuum of suck, with minor kidney pain on one side, and total anchor failure on the other. Get a dynamic rope.

Thanks for the reply petsfed, but I'm only concerned about arresting a 2' - 3' fall. I could have explained it in more detail as to my use but it seems I usually get my butt chewed off so I was trying to limit the scope.

I've spent most of the day researching static versus dynamic ropes and the various characteristics between them. It appears that the sheath on a dynamic rope is made of nylon with properties that suit that type of need. The sheath on a static rope appears to be made of polymer which does not stretch nearly as much, is more abrasion and friction resistant, is water resistant, and not affected by UV rays.

It seems the static rope would be a better candidate to stay outside for 2-3 months and still be able to arrest a fall. And I would use 6-8 turns on my prussic loop. But if dynamic rope would be a better choice to be kept outdoors in the elements for a 2'-3' fall, than that's what I need to know.


csproul


Dec 30, 2013, 6:53 PM
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Re: [tpcollins] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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Even a 2-3' fall on static material is dangerous. If you are falling, you need a dynamic rope.


marc801


Dec 31, 2013, 8:08 AM
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Re: [tpcollins] My last question . . . [In reply to]
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tpcollins wrote:
I've spent most of the day researching static versus dynamic ropes and the various characteristics between them. It appears that the sheath on a dynamic rope is made of nylon with properties that suit that type of need. The sheath on a static rope appears to be made of polymer which does not stretch nearly as much, is more abrasion and friction resistant, is water resistant, and not affected by UV rays.
Nylon is a polymer; static ropes are made of nylon.

Go with a dynamic rope and the Gri-gri arrangement described by rocknice. Using a prusik to arrest a fall is not the most reliable approach.


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