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jt512


Oct 22, 2003, 4:11 PM
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Introductions
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As of this afternoon (10/22) we have 12 members. Welcome, everybody! To get the ball rolling why don't each of us introduce ourselves. Let us know a little about your climbing background, your interest in mental training for climbing, what you hope to get out of this group, and anything else you'd like to mention. Also, I have a request. No one should feel compelled to do so, but I think it would be nice if we addressed each other by our first names, rather than our usernames.

I'll start off.

I first climbed in 1985 in Yosemite. The route, the heinous "Unnamed 5.1" on the Manure Pile Buttress. Rumors that this route had been free soloed by Royal Robins in '39 in high heels persist, but are unconfirmed. At any rate, I was hooked. Partners were harder to find back in those days, especially for a completely untalented climber such as myself. Thus, I climbed sporadically for several years, until finally finding a regular partner around 1988. Mabel, a 40-year-old Chinese woman who looked 20 and rode a Harley, and I climbed together for several years, mostly at J Tree, Stoney Point, and various local trad crags. This continued until I took a lead fall in which I grounded, severely spraining my ankle. It took several years for my ankle really to get strong and I didn't climb again until about 6 years ago, when I discovered sport climbing. Though I do rack up now and again, today mostly I sport climb, as I prefer gymnastic climbing at my limit to other flavors of climbing.

Although my ankle has healed from the fall I mention above, my head, more than 10 years later, has not. I find myself all too often not climbing with full commitment, grabbing a draw rather than risking a reasonable fall, etc. This takes away from my enjoyment of climbing. For me, the greatest satisfaction comes from climbing with complete commitment, climbing till I either clip the anchors or fall. I've gotten to a point in climbing where I know I can work a hard route and eventually redpoint it, but how I approach the route has become more important to me than whether I achieve the redpoint. I'd honestly rather fall while giving 100% to the effort than reach the anchors and score another redpoint. What I'm trying to accomplish using the Warrior principles is to learn to consistently commit 100% to the effort.

-Jay


Partner phaedrus


Oct 22, 2003, 8:02 PM
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As of this afternoon (10/22) we have 12 members. Welcome, everybody! To get the ball rolling why don't each of us introduce ourselves. Let us know a little about your climbing background, your interest in mental training for climbing, what you hope to get out of this group, and anything else you'd like to mention. Also, I have a request. No one should feel compelled to do so, but I think it would be nice if we addressed each other by our first names, rather than our usernames.

-Jay

I first started climbing when I lived in Durango, CO back in '92. I climbed pretty steadily (4-5 days a week) while I was there, then moved back East where for a variety of reasons, I climbed a lot less often. About 2-3 years ago, I suffered a neck injury that put me out of climbing for about 2 years. I moved back to CO in '02 and got back into climbing as soon as I could and ended up starting a climbing team at the school where I now work. I've also done ropes course work, so I was familiar with some of the principles Arno puts forth, but I've found what he says to be really excellent. More than once the Rock Warrior's Way has pulled me through cruxes, both on and off the rock. The team I coach hears about it constantly, and we were honored when Arno donated a copy of the book to the team.

What do I expect to get from the group? Hmm... mostly discussion around his principles and how I can better apply them to climbing and to my team's activities, I guess, though I'm sure I'll get plenty more than that. :)

-Todd


calliope


Oct 22, 2003, 8:03 PM
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I've always had a short attention span and an eagerness to try new things. I've done everything in the past from horseback riding to sculling and salsa dancing to belly dancing. There's been very little I won't try once. I was a member of an outdoor club called Great Outdoors for a while and signed up to go on a rock climbing trip. My performance was rather dismal, but the exhilaration I felt from the process stayed with me over the course of the next year. Between grad school and a full time job, I didn't really have the time or energy to pursue yet another expensive new hobby, so I let it slide.

Just this past summer, I took a 101 class at a local climbing gym and fell in love with the sport all over again. Inside, I'm quite a daredevil due to the number of falls I've taken with no consequences. I've yet to take a fall outside and I believe that is the major source of my fear...it's out of proportion with reality. I've recently been doing a lot of bouldering and battling my height issues. Today I delayed my freak out a little bit and pushed through a few moves past my previous threshold. It was a good feeling.

I'm only a few chapters into the book, but I really think the mindset is helping.

Angela


b_fost


Oct 23, 2003, 4:29 AM
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Ive been climbing for about 10 months, hard 10 to easy 11 range. I've just recently started leading. Great stuff. I'm going to buy the rock warrior book today after school.

~Brian


desertclimber


Oct 23, 2003, 5:21 AM
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Heya! Ian here-

I've been climbing for 11+ years, and I enjoy every minute of it.

I saw my skill levels skyrocket the first few years of climbing, with a plateau and eventual decline in the following years. The last four years I have been up and down, with my mental state being the biggest problem, although I have plenty of time to climb. It doesn't matter how strong we are, if commitment holds us back.

After being introduced to Arno's book, I was only halfway through when I noticed a marked change in my climbing ability again. I realized it was not a problem, but a challenge- and then, an opportunity to improve! (Hmmm... Sounds like I'm quoting the book, eh?) *grin*

Anyway, I starting feeling smooth and confident again- Finally getting back to some of those harder routes I wanted! I know it all came from within me, but the book helped to point out a few things I was doing, and some others that I was not.

I'm looking forward to hearing what each of you has to say, and maybe finding ways we can feed off each other's experiences!

Cheers!
Ian.


lou_dale


Oct 23, 2003, 6:17 AM
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i agree with the last statements made as that this book (and the
course if you get an opportunity to take it) helps you with more
than just climbing.........it's a great book to help you with the
"cruxes of life." perfect thing to say! when i realized
that my greatest problem was actually ME - lack of confidence in my own abilities - everything improved ten-fold - climbing and life in general.

it took away my desire to compare myself to anybody else, accept me for who i am and who i am becoming and thank heavens for the book, the course, (naturally ARNO) - and climbing!

my life takes different twists and turns but the greatest joy is onsighting my life, breathing through the chaotic situations, committing myself to being the best human i can be as well as partner and climber, finding excitement in each new day (isn't each day an onsight flash ? nobody redpoints a day) - and feeling fulfilled at the end of each day.

life is good. live in the way of the warrior.


darin


Oct 23, 2003, 9:39 AM
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I've only been climbing for about a year and a half (June 5, 2002 was my first time), almost exclusively in the gym. I've taken precisely one lead class, and liked it, but struggled with it since the route was at my limits of a sport climb.. I'm stuck around the 5.9-5.9+ plateau. I'm about halfway thru the Horst book when I realized just how poor my mental approach to climbing was.. I don't fear heights.. but I do fear falling.. in the gym, I'm perfectly fine.. the person who got me hooked on climbing was a wonderful belayer and I'd trust her with my life on the rock. she's moved to Seattle, and I've wanted to move on to the real rock, but finding someone I can trust to belay has been an issue. The only time I've been on the real rock was just some simple bouldering..

before, I'd look at a 5.9 route, see the crux and get defeated before my shoes even left the floor. I'm not overly strong for a guy, and I used to use that as an excuse for not sending routes.. I've realized I'm probably strong enough to climb 5.11s, but my mental approach was holding me back.

I'm sure when I'm climbing some toprope stuff outside, I'll get a little apprenhensive, even if I totally trust my belayer. I'm hoping that with this book I'll be able to work thru this, give myself the ability to make an informed choice as to whether or not to keep on going, and know that I made the decision that was right for me..


robmcc


Oct 23, 2003, 11:01 AM
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First name's fine by me.

Climbing. I started in 1990 at the age of 18 at Seneca Rocks, WV. A 3 day class gave me a trial-by-fire intro to the sport. To say that I was gripped would be an understatment. I vividly remember my first fall which occurred on the last day of class on the first pitch of Totem (first pitch is 5.6ish, not 5.11). It felt like falling into electrified ice water. I went home at the end of the day hopelessly hooked. I bouldered around Great Falls, VA until I could afford gear.

In a year or 2, I don't really remember anymore, I started leading. I had driven out to Seneca for the weekend in hopes of hooking up with a partner. I met a gentleman 40+ years my senior who took me up harder things than I'd been accustomed to doing, then suggested I try leading. Le Gourmet was my first lead. I sewed up the first part of the climb almost top roping it, really. My then mentor's warning that I was going to burn all my pro at the bottom and have nothing left for the top came true. I had to run out the end of the climb. Thrilling, and I was instantly hooked all over again.

Over the next few years I climbed more and more. At peak I was going to Great Falls most days after work and Seneca every weekend. Now and again I couldn't find a partner, so rather than skip a weekend at Seneca, I plunked down $100+ for a soloist and took up rope soloing. I have some very, very vivid memories of those days. I remember sitting alone on a ledge, ropes sitting next to me, alone eating lunch and feeling like I was in the perfect place and time. Around the same time I remember doing the first pitch of Prune, which is about 5.4, 100' or so. One piece of pro about 7' up, one halfway, 1 at the top to protect the last move. I remember this one so well just because groundfall potential was there for most of the climb, and rather than be afraid of it I was *elated*. Rock solid, unshakable confidence. No way could I ever possibly fall off this climb. At the top I run into 2 guys who are top roping the second pitch, which I'd never done. They offer to let "us" take a ride, I accept, but tell them I have to rap down to clean the pitch first. Why, yes, I am soloing. *smile* Those 1000 heads eat this stuff up. They are impressed, and I am loving it. Sad, and embarassing to admit now, but that mattered. I pull my pro, jump on their rope, cruise the pitch, lower, thank them and continue to the summit. 90 minutes, parking lot to summit, climbing each pitch twice plus the detour up the second pitch of prune. The 1000 feed again, the ego swells.

Not long after, late in 1993 I showed up late one Saturday. There was enough light for one last climb, so I hiked over the the Burn, built an anchor of an equalized hex (#8, I think) and the tree at the base, tied my rope to it, clipped in and I was off. Girth hitched the tree on the route as my first placement. 1 or 2 more before the incut below the roof. Pulling that roof always felt a little dicey. I'd done this climb 4 or 5 times before, only twice with no falls. There was some rock formation at the base of the incut below the roof where I wedged a #9 stopper. A totally awful placement, it was horizontal and not even fully in the crack, if I can even call it a crack. "Well, that's crap." I thought, and moved on. Under the roof I place the smallest tcu in a crack behind a block, clip it and make the moves up to the lip of the roof. Committing for me, I don't think I can downclimb them if I have to.

There's a problem. Sudden, *MASSIVE* rope drag. I'm standing in this awkward stance, holding my weight plus the tension on the rope. Struggling with it for a few minutes, I realize I can't figure out what's causing it OR get it to release. I'm coming off whether I like it or not. I look down and realize a straight down fall puts me on the ledge. Ow. I can jump to clear it, so I yell down to a party on something 20' or so to the left to warn them not to be under me. I jump. I have a crystal clear recollection of the wall drifting back, then racing upwards. I hear the wind start to rush by, then the rope catches with a strong pull. POP! The tcu is out. I'm a little disoriented. I look up and see the ground. Oh joy, inverted fall on a soloist. I do have a backup knot in the rope, but don't get that far. I hit the rock with my lower back hard enough to flip me over causing the soloist to arrest the fall, but not hard enough to cause any injury more severe than a dinner plate sized bruise covered in scratches. Another strong pull as I zip by the tree. The same tree that was my first pro. I stop, frighteningly close to the ground, and all that tension in the rope pulls me back up. The TCU and draw smacks into my tie in. Some words of concern from the other party and a quick inventory reveals no injuries. I'm happy. life is good, I just took what felt like a major fall and lived to tell about it. The ego's loving this. But only for a moment.

The TCU pulled. The crappy placement held. It shouldn't have held. But, says that little voice in my head, you're damned lucky it did. How far down was your next placement? Yeah. Too far. Running it out had become a matter of pride. The little voice continues. "Had that placement blown, and it should have, you'd have gone what, another 20? 25? more? Groundfall. You'd be dead now. You'd be a gruesome story told around the campfire." I carefully pull the few pieces or pro, and there must not have been much because I didn't get anywhere near that #9 stopper, yet I remember that being the only thing I left. I lower myself to the ground, unsling the tree, and fail to dislodge the hex. The force of the fall has it jammed well enough that my now shaking hands can't dislodge it. The two guys from the other party offer to try to get it out, and I laugh and tell them if they can get it they can keep it. I'm just happy not to be bleeding all over it. They succeed in eventually breaking it loose and graciously return it.

Reading the above it sounds dangerously like spray, but I hope it doesn't come across that way. What I want to convey is that I had the mental game so solidly way back when, and that I climbed for a lot of the wrong reasons. To a small extent, I climbed to impress people and to be different. Mostly, I climbed to impress myself.You know, it's funny. I don't think I realized the truth of that until today.That 1-2 seconds of falling is also the dividing line between then and now. I think it's important.

That was my last lead for nearly 10 years. I tried to get back on a month later. A friend and I drove out. 9 hours on the back of a motorcycle in cold rain, but I couldn't do it. We got to the base of Le Gourmet, and I just couldn't. One fall, and I'd gone from rope soloing 5.8s to I won't lead a 5.4. Within a year, I was an ex-climber, although to be fair, there were other reasons for that.

Fast forward to 2003. I'm back into climbing. March finds me in a gym. Sketched out, on top rope, in a gym, but it comes back. May or June, and we're outside again, top roping. Sketched out, on top rope. Feh. But it comes back. This month I do my first multipitch trad climb since 1993. A 5.4. And it scares the crap out of me, partly because the available pro isn't as frequent as I'd like (more than 1 20'+ runout) and it's ledgey. I do this climb one weekend in an amount of time I'm frankly too embarassed to admit. The next week I do the first pitch, then bail. From a 5.4. A climb I should be able to solo. My mental imagery fills with me taking 40' dives onto ledges. Getting 20-25 feet up the second pitch and inexplicably pulling a bomber hex. Taking a fall factor 2 onto a belay I'm not confident will hold a 50' FF2. Getting people killed who I've come to care quite a bit about. That last is an especially disturbing image. I'm not too fond of getting hurt myself, but thinking of allowing someone to get hurt who has trusted me to keep them safe is abhorrent.

So, what do I want out of this? I want my lead head back. A quick read of the book suggests I need just about all of it. I need to keep ego out of my climbing. I need focus. The book talks about impeccability, which if I recall (read it a week or so ago) is the perfect use of attention. I'd swear I was there once. Perfect confidence, and razor sharp focus on the here and now. At this point, I've never been farther from it.

Rob


shank


Oct 23, 2003, 11:08 AM
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My name is Steve. I started climbing about 2 years ago and just recently, since I have had the book actually, had my first, and only hopefully, Time where I didn't feel like my heart was in it anymore. My hardest climbs have been .9 onsight and .10c rp's. Not that that matters, but I was getting frustrated with it kind of. Then I started rereading this book and figure out what was happening. I can't wait to climb this weekend.
Just got some new shoes too.


maculated


Oct 23, 2003, 1:59 PM
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Very interesting backgrounds.

::extends hand:: Kristin.

Anyway, I was sort of opposed to an entire forum for the RWW, but I am also very curious about its success and development, and being a student of psychology, humanistics, and literature, I can't stay away from it in the same vein.

Climbing history? Three or so years ago I watched my best friend at the time go off to J-Tree to climb. I thought it was interesting but he wanted it to be a 'boys' activity, so he never took me out. A high school friend of mine started frequenting the crappy gym here and the long and short of it is that I am now far more dedicated to all aspects of the sport than the both of them.

Spent about 8 months sport climbing but knew that I wanted to REALLY know how to climb, so I took up trad. I've been doing sport and trad for the last two years, and don't climb nearly as frequently as I used to, but hopefully that will change one day. I actually am back in grad school so that I'll have the free time to do so the rest of my life. Climbing Aid now, too.

I'm a typical chick climber, I worry about my partners, get nervous when I belay, get nervous when leading (though I will rarely let that show). No bravado. I think this works for me because it makes sure I stay within my range. At the same time, in three years of leading up to 5.10b (depending on the training I've been doing), I have not taken a lead fall.

I really learned that I don't trust the gear so much when my partner decked in Yosemite, at the start of what was going to be the summer of my leading 5.10 trad solidly. Now I'm focusing on safety, but I am in a situation that i can pick up that goal this year and run with it. But now I always get worried if my partner's leg is shaking, and I always run through self-rescue scenarios when climbing. Probably makes me a good belayer, but I'd like to feel a relative amount of peace when climbing again. It will come with time, but that's why I am primarily interested in this discussion for my own reasons.


on_sight_man


Oct 23, 2003, 3:20 PM
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My name is Kirk.

I've been climbing about 5 years now. Climbing for me started when I was in my early 30's and concided with a life change. I moved from New York City to Crested Butte, CO. I tried EVERYTHING outdoorsy there was to offer including bouldering. I was and am hooked on the people I meet. Bouldering seemed socially easier so that's how I got started. Since then, I've rotated through bouldering, sport, and trad as I've met other people, seasons make certain types easier, and myy whims change. Right now, I'm doing a lot of trad climbing and some sport.

One frustration for me has been the plateaus. For the first few years, I seemed to progress at a rate that I could actually notice. After I hit the hard 5.10 range, that slowed down a lot. So forr the past couple of years, it's been about busting into 5.12s on sport and 5.11s on trad. I spend a LOT of time climbing (4-5 days a week sometimes) which may be some of my problem, however, it's still so compelling that I do not want to give the time back even if it were to improve my ability. So I try to have soft days and hard days.

I read the WW and found it pretty enlightening. I've read a lot of books about subjects like this (Zen meditation yada yada) and though they're interesting, they're very hard to implement. I'm a person who needs a task so I appreciate the exersises.

I'm not sure what I hope to gain from the forum, but I'm willing to post and see whether people have input that might help. I AM a firm believer that that the largest opportunity for improvement lies in my mind not my body. I don't know whether WW will help, but it certainly can't hurt, and there are always lessons to be learned everywhere.


furbucket


Oct 23, 2003, 9:40 PM
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I've been climbing for a little over one year. Sport, mostly. Some bouldering. No trad yet. At first I thought I'd develop my athletic skills as a climber and then work on mental training. On good days when I have my focus, its quite exhilarating. I don't know why I lose my focus, but when I do, it's pretty much nonstop obscenities until I get off the rock. I realize I need to work on mental training now not only to get better at climbing but just to make it more enjoyable.

I'm hoping the book and exercises will help me ascertain why I lose my focus and what I can do to keep it.

-Holly


jen_c


Oct 24, 2003, 9:19 AM
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Hi, I'm Jennifer
I've been climbing for 2 years now. I started out scrambling around on rocks with my best friend Ken as well as going rappelling. He had done a bit of climbing so I decided to try it out too. I signed up for "My First Time Rock Climb" with the Challenge Rock Climbing School here in Atl in Aug 2001. Then went on to take "Basic Climbing Camp" in Oct 2001. I didn't really do much with it until that Dec when I joined the Atl Climbing Club and I've been hooked ever since.
I took a trad class in Mar of 2002 and did my first lead on a multi-pitch climb (I don't start small!!! ) in NC that May. I also got the pleasure of taking my first lead fall on that same climb. All my gear held though and all was good. The fall, however, freaked out my husband pretty good (he was belaying me). Ever since then, I've let him (subconciously) be a limiting factor for me - I still climb lead though not as much as I would like to and therefore am not really advancing like I would like to. I took the Warrior's Way 2-day class in Sept of 2002 and have been working to implement the processes in my climbing ever since. I think I may even have my husband to the point where he can accept seeing me fall!!!

As far as what I would like to get out of this group...mostly I would like it to be a place where we can discuss how we apply the processes to our climbing and help out each other with the hurdles that are encountered as we go through the whole learning process.


lou_dale


Oct 24, 2003, 12:56 PM
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being 40 and climbing is great....i'm almost 52 (nov 1) and it really does get better-er. there was an article in time magazine about older "rockers" and the guy in the photo was the man who started the school that i went to (as did jen_c) - The Challenge - his name is Jerry Dodgen - and Jerry is kicking serious boo-tayyyyy on the rock at 72. So older can be better.

All climbing is climbing - and i love all of it and need it to feed my soul. The biggest reason i do enjoy the sport routes is being able to practice the principles in the book with greater safety. Most of the places we go are closely monitored for bolts, etc. (Arno being one of those). It's a good place to practice and push your limits I think.

I love trad as well though but when it comes to cold weather - I'm wimpy and will play my BUT I'M 52 card if that works.......

I'm not big into bouldering but will do that in our basement gym which can raise the hair on the back of your neck at times - it may be plastic but it has a 9 foot ceiling and several places where negotiating crossing the roof/ceiling is optional.

If I fall, I still sound like Julie Andrews hitting her highest notes ever (that would be Mary Poppins to those who may not know her) but I know when i put the gear in, it will hold - the only reason it wouldn't would be if the rock itself were to break apart. My partner is my husband who seems to have confidence in my abilities - and maybe enjoys seeing me fall a wee bit more than one should. Maybe he just likes hearing me scream - who knows?

All climbers are hot but I think the book and the principles may temper some of that a little - at least to a smolder - rather smolder longer than burn fast.

It's nice to see so many open minds and hearts embrace the principles here; and I hope that in time we can benefit even more from each other.


Partner costellobr


Oct 24, 2003, 4:48 PM
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dalguard


Oct 25, 2003, 2:27 PM
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My name is Dawn. I've been climbing about 4 years now. I mostly trad climb because that's what's available to me but I climb sport when I can.

I used to be kind of bold, too bold probably, but freaked myself out a couple of years ago with a couple of near misses and have never fully regained my love of climbing. Which is the worst of it. I wouldn't mind so much if I weren't improving, which I actually am although very slowly, if I were still enjoying myself, which I'm usually not.

I'm only a couple of chapters into the book so far but I'm hoping it really can help me to climb for love not fear.


iamthewallress


Oct 27, 2003, 12:02 PM
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My name is Melissa.

I could have written Dawns post...at least some of the time. I think that I really do climb for love, but sometimes, I feel such utter terror (for weeks at a time) every time I go out, that I'm not sure that I still do. Occasionally, though, I do have a magical days where I'm not scared and climb well, and those are the kind of days that I live for.

Since I realize that what stands between me and those great days is a mental barrier that I can learn to control, I'm working through this sometime difficult process of mental improvement, just like I'm accumululating scabs in my efforts to learn how to climb wide cracks!

Mostly I do traditional free climbing...mostly in Yosemite, but occasionally in Joshua Tree or other points south. I don't really care for sport climbing or bouldering as most persue it because I'm really averse to falling (even on TR), but I may try to do more of that type of climbing as part of my approach to the WW to learning how to deal with safe falls. Aid climbing is my favorite flavor, and I'm so much more at ease in aiders than I am when free climbing. I sort of figure that I've spent a lifetime learning to trust my brain while considering myself a bit of a klutz, such that I have an easier time trusting my engineering than I do trusting my physical skill. Nonetheless, I'm not a very bold aid climber either and I'd be happy to work on improving my (reasonable) trust in my aid gear.


evan


Nov 3, 2003, 12:01 PM
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Hey all,

Being able to read everyone's stories has been insightful, and comforting in a strange way. Thanks for posting, and Jay, thanks for starting this thread.

I started climbing two and a half years ago. I got dragged to an indoor gym by some friends, and after a couple of visits I decided I'd found something worth pursuing long term. Soon I was outside, toproping everything I could set easy anchors up on, and planning on leading as soon as possible. I took my first roadtrip - to El Potrero Chico - for a month of sportclimbing right before my one year mark for climbing. I had three leads under my belt - outside - prior to that trip. I had a mission on that trip it seemed, prove myself and feed my ego or burn out trying. Bad strategy.

The trip went quite well, it seemed at first. I had climbed a number of multi-pitch sportclimbs (Snot Girlz, Space Boyz, El Sendero Diablo) projected and sent some hard - for me - single pitch routes, (Pangea / Lies Spies and Naked Thighs / Red Helmet) and kept it together while leading a 100 foot pitch with only 3 bolts for protection, (3rd pitch of Jungle Mountaineering). For some reason though, all of the pitches I logged, (something in neighborhood of 80 pitches) didn't seem to improve my head at all. I was still unwilling to go for a risky move, and more likely to yell for take.

I came back to Ottawa, promptly injured myself, and spent two months recuperating. Upon my return to the sport, I found myself terrified of climbing on lead. I think part of this was due to the huge whipper I took leading the 3rd pitch of El Sendero Diablo. A broken hold sent me hurling past three bolts, while the remains of the pinch I was squeezing tumbled down the lower half of the Outrage Wall / Bronco Bowl. I was shaken for the rest of that climb. To make matters worse, grades in the North East seemed consistently harder than climbs of the same grade in Potrero. Grades that once provided warm-ups for me had been elevated to semi-project status.

Later that summer, a chance encounter at the gym and an undeveloped field of granite eggs near home prompted me to take up bouldering for the remainder of that summer. For some reason, I found myself able to turn down or turn off my fear of falling when bouldering. Two of my proudest first ascents that summer were two highballs which still haven't seen repeats. In the back of my head, it seems as if I was still feeding my Ego in earnest. We all avoided rating any of our problems, so at least I know a large part of my satisfaction was based on fulfilling a personal best, outside the confines of imposed standards, (i.e., number grades).

I started climbing easy trad at the end of that season, and became excited with the prospect of demanding crack climbs. I also realized that I had fallen into habits of avoidance. It seemed as if bouldering and easy trad were simple diversions for facing my fear of falling. If I wanted to climb harder trad routes, I would have to face this fear.

This past winter, a friend suggested I devote some of my training to "fall therapy." I also set a goal for myself: become the best, well-rounded climber I could be by the end of the season. I wanted to feel comfortable bouldering, clipping bolts or climbing on gear. I didn't realize this goal until the near end of the season, when my grade chasing subsided, and Iet myself learn from my failures, and essentially be at peace with my inability to "send" certain climbs regardless of the climb.

Although I just finished reading Arno's book, I found that one of the most valuable lessons was to approach a climb with an attitude of what I can give, rather than what I can receive if I send it. Bailing off of trad climbs, leaving boulder problems undone, and failing on a redpoint of a route used to leave me feeling woefully inadequate in the past. Even when applying some of Arno's basic principles in the last two weeks outside, I have noticed a change. I wish I had read this book earlier in the season, as opposed to realizing many of the same lessons in the field, after burning out physically and mentally halfway through the summer.

My fear of falling is still there, but it's getting better. Love-based motivation really does provide a btter impetus for improved climbing than hating your way up th roack. I logged numerous falls on sport climbs this season, several heinous falls - almost off the pads - while bouldering, and had my first *real* (i.e, unexpected and allout going for the moves) trad fall after reading the book. The gear, (a small nut) held, and let me start to believe in my placements as much as my mentors do. The more I abandoned my Ego this season and climbed for the climb rather than the number, the more "grades oriented" goals I ticked. It's a strange sort of dualism, and one I'm still getting used to.

I still have trouble onsighting demanding climbs. That's when everything kind of falls apart. I realized this past weekend that my fear comes largely from a fear of the unknown. I'm more inclined to commit when I know - without a doubt - what is to come. I hesitate, I don't fully commit, and I constantly underestimate myself.

I hope to share some things I've learned, but more importantly learn from everyone else's experiences in applying Arno's principles and continue to grow amidst the chaos. I think if you can see the opportunity to learn from your fears, there's no limit to the amount of growth you can experience.

Thanks all,
Evan


supafreak


Nov 6, 2003, 7:47 AM
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My name is Robert. I have been climbing for 9yrs now. The WW book has changed my perspective on climbing an has helped me achieve things I didn't think possible before while climbing...and I am still climbing things that I previously thought impossible while working two jobs and not really getting out but once every couple months while putting my wife through med school.


vivalargo


Nov 6, 2003, 9:21 AM
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Hello, friends, My name is John. I know Arno quite well, and we exchanged ideas for several years before his book was published. Arno and I both hope to work together on some sort of project . . . someday. For the time being I'll start chiming in on this list. This material is very close to me, as I've been involved in the so-called human development, peak performance movement since my undergrad years back in the 70s.

Sincerely,
JL


Partner costellobr


Nov 7, 2003, 3:28 AM
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john....largo..Venezuela......

hmmm, troll bait, eat fishy, fishy


tkambitsch


Nov 10, 2003, 7:35 PM
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Greetings,

I was so pleased to see this club start up. I am on my second read of RWW as the first time I whipped through it so quickly I think I probably missed a lot. This time I am reading it slower and pondering. There are single paragraphs that say so much.

Anyway, I climbed sporatically in the mid-70s and even less in the 80s, none in the early 90s but in August 1999 I got hooked at the New River Gorge. Been climbing frequently at the Urban Krag in Dayton and get down to the Red River Gorge in Kentucky on a regular basis. I climb mainly trad outside, but my climbing partner George and I keep it pretty easy. Longer trips to Seneca Rocks and Red Rocks Canyon allow for plenty of multi-pitch easy routes that are just plain fun. I rarely move beyond the "comfort zone" as I've NEVER taken a lead fall outside! Not sport, not trad. It has been years since I've fallen on lead inside.

I've already seen some benefits from the RWW. I am focusing, waiting when I think I am going to get gripped, relaxing, breathing. I'm going to get past my fear of falling with the RWW.

Tim Kambitsch


lou_dale


Nov 11, 2003, 5:42 PM
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Joined: 27 May 2003
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Location: Greenville, Georgia
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Posted: Wed Oct 22, 2003 11:05 pm Post subject: let me introduce myself

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My name is Lou; my husband is Dale; our red aussie is my daughter - Bonnie - that is our family. We live in Georgia; he's a firefighter working double shifts while i manage 40 acres here in the deep south - where grasshoppers look more like something on sci-fi - so I am frequently wiggy.

Approximately in 1994, my husband wanted to add adventure sports to our list of things to do and at that time, I was having horrific problems with height and exposure as in I would not go up a ladder, could not go into elevators.......the list is endless. Why on earth I decided to do this, I have NO idea but.......I agreed.

I have never in my life had more fun on one weekend adventure in my entire (almost as of november 1) 52 years! It was so exciting that I wrote a letter describing how it made me feel to the school we had gone to, describing the feeling of climbing as "having liquid electricity race through my veins....." We top roped for years at the advice of some people. We probably should have made a transition earlier, but regardless - we didn't and then two years ago, we (dale and I) decided to jump in with both feet.

We did seconding classes, we did intermediate classes, and then we began on very easy trad leads - maybe 5.2 or 5.4. Then....we decided to learn better clipping and rope management and went to Foster's in Tennessee....my first bolted route was a 5.5 - Rocket Slab. I was absolutely soooooo alive, it was the most wonderful thing I had ever experienced. The very next day, I jumped on Mammplitude and almost did that entire route and it's a 5.10! I was just so excited - My passion was renewed.

While out there, we were honored by watching a class given by Arno Ilgner, got a card, and signed up for a two class with him. He came up with a hybrid course on falling on trad and king swinging and balance. I still had issues but wasn't aware of these issues........YET.

After our class and subsequent vacation, we realized....I needed more work, we both could use more. So we then signed up and took the two day Warrior Course. Arno has nailed it and I sincerely believe he has x-ray vision - but the type that sees into your soul. Through his journey, he has discovered key points that lead to what we THINK is failure - we seem to think that if you don't finish a route or if you don't get to the top - you have failed. I was carrying around so much baggage when it came to climbing (due to past difficulties) that my climbing and life in general was suffering.

After that weekend, I realized......I now have the tools to repair the damage. I don't mean be afraid of me.......no, no.....I mean we all have issues from time to time. I THOUGHT I had height issues. I was of the impression that I had to compare myself to others. So I'm afraid to get too high but I love climbing and yet afraid to climb around others because they may be better than me. So what was up with this? Simple - after going through the course, I was made aware - it was about confidence......or as the course sets up - trust. I trusted in the equipment. I trusted my partner. I didn't have self confidence in myself.

Since taking the course, I have improved 3,000 percent - by doing my first multi pitch at Castlerocks; by seconding the first pitch of Jackson's Thumb which was very exposed; and all in all - the passion I had for climbing when we first started has increased beyond my imagination.

I have done some 5.7 and 5.8 trad leads; I have done some 5.9 and 5.10 sport leads; I have now done some multi pitch - granted this may not sound remarkable to some but we have to remember, I'm almost 52 (and only 5 feet 3 and averaging 102-105 lbs) - and just getting started.

Arno's course and his book (which my husband and I have both read several times and never are without it) have renewed my passion for climbing, made me realize that whether you are 16 or 60 - do what you love, do it safely, use these tools and you can be filled with joy.

Isn't that what it's all about? It's not about the numbers; or how many climbs can I knock off in one day....or if I don't get to the top, I failed - it is about doing what we love. I read about it, I go every chance possible, I dream about it and I realize that absolutely nothing on this planet is impossible if you have the right tools and use those tools to better you.

So I am a better me and I am filled with this joy and passion that could only be compared to those original rock rats of yesteryear when all they cared about was getting up and going climbing, throwing on whatever clothes you could grab, being with your friends, laughing and loving and being really really alive because you are doing something that gives you a sense of what heaven really is.

The happiest I am is when I'm climbing and because of Arno's courses and book, I am on a fantastic journey - of discovery. I get to discover who I really am while doing what I truly love, being with the people I care about.

Life is good. Thanks for letting me share - Lou
_________________
Lou - I'm the momma
and
Dale - He's the daddy
and
bonnie, our red aussie - She's the baby


boz84


Nov 13, 2003, 2:52 PM
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Hi, my name is William, but all my friends call me Boz, and I encourage you to do the same.

I have been climbing "seriously" for about 2 years, although first time my hand hit rock was 5th grade, 1994. Two years ago I was given the excelent oppurtunity to staff at a summar Boy Scout camp, as a member of the Summit team (basically involved in climbing and backcountry trekking). While the standard fare atthe camp is top-ropping, I am now currently looking to get into lead, both sport and trad. Regardless, through Arno's principles, I hope my climbing in general, on TR as well as lead, will improve vastly. By improve, I mean that I will be able to enjoy it for what it is, and not my so-called "successes" and "failures", both of which I feel I have too many of.

My saddest memory of camp from last summer was the last day there. Me and my crew of Summit staffers decided for a good-bye climb at one of our favorite walls. I roped up for a climb that had pestered me all year, and the year before. A "lowly" 5.10, but still, I didn't have what it ook to climb it. I blamed it on my lack of strength. I blamed it on the extra reach I needed to get a better jam in a crack. I blamed it on everything I could, but fact was, by the end of the day, it had licked me. And I hated myself for missing another oppurtunity to finish the climb.

I feel confident now, through the Warriors teachings, that I could walk up to that climb, get on it, and figure out just what I am missing, and how I can improve it. My speculative guess is that I have not been conscious of my inner-self, or the climb for the past 2 years.

I hope that through this forum, and the Rock Warriors Way, I can train myself to be able to instantly discover that which is halting my progress.

-Boz


hkclimb


Nov 18, 2003, 11:29 AM
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Hi everyone, I am HK. I am very new to climbing. I started only this year (Feb), first in the gym and then outdoor. At first, with toproping, I really think that climbing was all about physical ability (strength, technique etc). So I hit the gym, lose weight, climb a lot on toprope. Improvement was really easy since I am just starting. But my view changed when I led my first route (sport), which was well below what I can toprope. It was really scary. And every time I lead (or even driving to the crag), I felt kind of sick in the stomach. I realized there was a huge mental element to climbing too - and that's when I pick up the book and join this group. :)

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