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kriso9tails


Feb 28, 2002, 1:51 PM
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Money in Climbing Photography...
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...or photography period. I'm in the application process for university and college level photography, and I've had several artists in this field tell me that I have a very strong chance of getting accepted to one of the best schools in the province... but then what? That doesn't mean I can get a job in this field.

I'm not sure if I'd go into photography full-time (or even if I'd be able to), but how hard is it to make a living off of photography alone, (and not doing portraits... not that there's anything wrong with that).

Let's say I wanted to work for Rock and Ice, how does that work? Do they pay you per picture, do they hire you on as a photographer and give you a wage, or is it both, or maybe neither? Do you think any of the photographers for that magazine do that and ony that for a living?

I don't think that it would be a career path for me, but I would like to dabble, and I have two pictures (I'd show them to you but I cant scan them in) that are almost magazine quality (although I've seen much worse pictures published), and I know that I can do much better... I've just never had the time to try climbing photography seriously.


its_me_drew


Feb 28, 2002, 3:08 PM
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I think that its kind of like trying to be a musician. It will be hard to break in to the business, but once you are known among the right type of people you may be able to make a good living out of it.


krillen


Feb 28, 2002, 4:33 PM
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hey Kris, whatever you misunderstand here you can always ask me at the gym.

1st off, very few places have an on salary photographer, and you have to be fantastic. Magazines i.e. Rock and Ice, don't. they pay by the piece. same with ads, you get a climber ot climb with their goods, take a whack of shots and submit them.

The submissions are almost entirely on slide, but with the proliferation of digital tech. it will probably move to that soon enough.

Photography is expensive. Equipment, film, developing, etc. and if it's climbing related add in tavel, lodgins, food, etc. I have a friend that has been published numerous time and still can't make a full-time go of it. Mind you he doesn't do weddings adn potraits etc.

there are some people that make it a full-time gig, but it's long hard hours, and not a lot of cash. Photojournalism, newspapers, and mags would be you target group if you are interested.

ask perhaps at photo.net

[ This Message was edited by: krillen on 2002-02-28 16:36 ]


kriso9tails


Mar 2, 2002, 5:30 PM
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Lodgings and food? I don't need all these luxuries. I'll move my dark room into a trailer home (one that can still move, not as in trailer trash [no offense to trailer trash ]), and I'll live off of road kill and the fumes from the chemical baths (I sometimes have visions after extended periods of inhaling fix as an added bonus). Yeah, that's the life fer me.

I mostly just need time to burn film... and film to burn. Worse comes to worse I can always become a teacher.


crux_clipper


Mar 6, 2002, 3:16 AM
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Go to www.onsight.com.au
Cherack out this dude Simon Carter. I bet he gets paid a bucketload for some of his shots. He sells some as posters, and produces a calander every year.

Oh, by the way, HIS AN OZZI!!!!!!!

i had to say that.


apollodorus


Mar 6, 2002, 3:34 AM
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As a BWPT (Big Wall Photography Theorist), I might suggest that getting the Good Shots is a good way to get paid for them. Anybody can use a disposable camera for snapshots; not everybody can get the shots that the right equipment requires. If I were doing it, I would look at getting a BIG telephoto lens. That way, the intimate look-at-the-details-of-that-guy-on-scary-aid shots can be taken from the safety (sic) of El Cap Tower.


krillen


Mar 6, 2002, 5:55 AM
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I think if Kris has a good chance at gettign into univeristy than he's using something a little more sophisicated than a disposible camera.

If your shots are good, geting paid for them isn't that hard. But there is so much overhead associated with climbing AND photography, it's hard to make PROFIT.

Also the best way to shoot climbing, is to 1.) BE a climber 2.) be set up ON or near the climb. YOu have ot get in there with them so you convey the emotion that people want to see. SOME long distance shots work, but MOST are close ups. You Don't need anything much bigger than a fast 300mm lense. HUGE telephoto lenses are for wildlife photographers. You just have to get yourself into a good position and bracket bracket bracket.







saltspringer


Mar 6, 2002, 3:31 PM
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Is it Ryerson that you're referring to? Basically, they'll prepare you to work as a commercial photographer which is where the bulk of the money is in the photo game...there are lots of different types of commercial photography including magazine work but very few photographers make their living exclusively from one branch of photography. For instance, I'm currently working on a book with two other photographers: I stay afloat with Fine Art work, some climbing & some (specialized) portraiture, another of my colleagues works in-studio (portraiture), outdoors (landscape) and teaches Tai Chi on the side and finally, the third photographer worked his whole career in the catalogue/fashion business and made a very good living by it but with an enourmous amount of stress, pressure and talent. Personally, I've found that the most rewarding part of photography has been finding my own vision of the world through a medium that I love: if you focus on making a living from photography then you'll do fine in the Ryerson program but if you want to fulfill a personal vision, use the program as a good, solid technical base and then start using all of that technique to shoot what you want and worry about the paychecks later...it's a great way to make a living but it can also become a real slog if you get into heavy, competitive commercial work,

good luck!

Mike


kriso9tails


Mar 6, 2002, 3:34 PM
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Ryerson and Sheridan are my two top choices.

I went to a seminar for Sheridan College photography applicants, and also to a short seminar from a Ryerson university grad who studied photography, and it seems that all of the money is in advertisements. I wouldn't mind doing advertisements, especially if it's climbing related... after all, we can't all live like Galen Rowell. I'll do any form of photography, but I don't think I'll ever be the guy who does portraits at the local Sears.

300 mm. seems to be a bit more than I'd want (I think). If you consider, 100 ASA slide in often overshadowed areas, on a slower lense, for a moving climber. I think it's all in understanding the light conditions and hitting the crags at the right time and of day and being set up in the right place though, so it really shouldn't matter what lense you're using (but there's always an optimal choice of course).

Two pieces of advice from professional photographers that I've picked up in the last week are: a) Don't bring too much gear to the crag or you'll get overwhelmed and won't want to shoot (I think I'd just bring two cameras each set to account for my different moods); and b) You're the photographer, you get a certain window of time to deal with and it's up to you to make it work. I think that includes scouting areas out before shooting, but if you don't, then you have to make due, or else it might be, "Excuse me Mr. Sharma, would you mind meeting me back here at 6 am to do realization again... I'd like to take some pictures."

I don't know what I'm talking about anymore... I was up late last night finishing a portfolio and nowmy thoughts don't seem to make much sense



Saltspringer: How much time do you devote to your photography (say in a fairly busy week)?

[ This Message was edited by: kriso9tails on 2002-03-06 15:46 ]


saltspringer


Mar 6, 2002, 5:29 PM
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Hmm, the Summer is my really busy season when I'm in the darkroom or out shooting practically every day and working on sales alot of the time (tourist-based economy on Salt Spring). In the Winter months I'm usually out a few days a week shooting general landscape or specific projects that I'm interested in at any given time. I've also been roped in to shooting more portraits lately (good money!) and since I've got a bit of a reputation & people know what my aesthetic sensibilities are like, the portraits are quite rewarding: I only shoot B&W and I switch between 35mm & medium format to maintain a good variety of images. Most of the time it's a real balancing act between getting basic inventory ready, shooting new pictures, hanging shows, preparing for shows, selling images, writing contracts, updating my websites...oh, and working part-time at the local cinema! When I'm through with all of that, I go climbing and take a few shots if I'm a bit tired out: wouldn't trade it for the world!

Mike


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