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Beginner Slackline advice
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chimera


Nov 28, 2003, 2:28 PM
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Beginner Slackline advice
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I was thinking about getting a slackline, I have slacklined a couple times before, my question is whether I should get an Ethos slackline or some other brand. If I chose to get the Ethos slackline, which one should I get between the standard, deluxe or any of the other ones.


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Nov 28, 2003, 2:46 PM
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Re: Beginner Slackline advice [In reply to]
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It always comes down to finding the kit that meets your needs. How long of lines are you expecting to need and such and how much effort you want to put into setting one up.

Any of the kits out there seem to be good quality so it's picking for your application. Pretty much each kit caters to different needs. We usually go for the backyard slacker on a tight budget for example.

Slackline Express
http://www.slacklineexpress.com (my site)

Slackline Brothers
http://www.slackline.com

Ethos
http://www.ethosclimbing.com

Asana Packworks
http://www.asanapackworks.com

Any specifics requirements you are looking at? Each kit seems to have an advantage over the primitive setup from the ease of use persective and some of the kits are priced about the same cost, if not cheaper, as having a dedicated make-it-yourself kit.


chimera


Nov 29, 2003, 1:17 PM
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I have two trees that I can use, I dont have any tree slings or webbing myself. I think I have narrowed it down to Ethos slackline because I can buy them at my local gym, and Asana packworks because I have heard equally good things about them. Also, when talking to a worker at my gym he said to get a 50' line over the 30' line, is this correct to get?


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Nov 29, 2003, 1:45 PM
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personally...

i would go with the "chimera special"..

haha i dunno i would just make your own...webbing is mighty cheap these days u can find it for like $0.20 a foot or just buy one of those spools is prolly cheaper...but anyway u can get decent webbing for cheap and throw in some biners...just cut your own line to length...make your own slings/runners and BOOM! you got yourself a slackline!

good lucky with whatever you decide!!

ROCK ON!! :mrgreen:


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Nov 29, 2003, 10:11 PM
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It's pretty easy for a beginner to outgrow a 30' once you've gotten over the newbie hump; so if you know your going to stick with it a 50 is definately recommended.

If you can, I'd suggest borrowing someone else's kit for a day to learn how to set it up and find out the strengths and weaknesses of the kit yourself. That way you'd be happy with your purchase no matter what.

There isn't anything wrong with making your own all, but you've gotta buy a lot more webbing than just the slings & main line to make the tightening system and such - plus any pre-made kit I've ever seen is a LOT easier to use.

I'd also caution against using the same carabiners you use for climbing as part of your slackline. I've talked to Omega and a few other places about it and we all came to the conclusion it's not worth the risk to reuse them for life critical use later.


alvchen


Nov 29, 2003, 10:58 PM
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Re: Beginner Slackline advice [In reply to]
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There isn't anything wrong with making your own all, but you've gotta buy a lot more webbing than just the slings & main line to make the tightening system and such - plus any pre-made kit I've ever seen is a LOT easier to use.

All i've got for my line is 2 slings, one 35' piece of 1" webbing, and 4 biners. You can setup a pulley type system with the biners as a tightening system. You can make your own setup for easily under $50.


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Nov 30, 2003, 11:19 AM
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What I was meaning was that that 35' main piece of webbing doesn't mean you can do a full 35' line, you use some of the webbing in the tightening system on a primitive, plus to have some extra to pull on.

And your right you can make a primitive for around 50 or even less depending on how good of a source you get for the webbing of course.

Our intro's are $30 shipped and deluxe 50' is 50 shiped so it ends up about the same price as though you got a good deal, but with the 50 that's pretty much a full walkable 50. The same scenario applies for the other companies as well, they advertise what is walkable for the most part.

That's what I was getting at. Sorry if I was a bit vague - I was just trying to point out that there is a bit more webbing involved on a primitive than the main line. That way you can more reasonably compare making your own against buying any of the kits out there.


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