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making a tight line (for longer set ups) cheaply
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far_east_climber


Jan 3, 2004, 4:40 AM
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making a tight line (for longer set ups) cheaply
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Happy new year,

I've looked around the forum on a more efficient tightening set up for slacklining.. but i can't really find what i'm looking for so i'm wondering if maybe you guru's or anyone could help..

i put up a post some time back about 'longer lines and primitive systems' and was advised to using ascenders from one or two and pulleys.. well what i basically want to do is to be able to set up a long line (50ft +) as cheap as i can, hopefully using only a some biners and the webbing... i was thinking... could i use a french prussik (ascender made with 6mm static cord.. just incase) to tigthen my line.. i hear it can be realeased under load...

umm anyway... i have no idea where to go from here... basically if someone could tell me how i could set up a tight, long line with as little equipment as possible it would verrrryyy appreciated

took me a while to get to my point and i'm still not sure if i've conveyed it properly :lol: i'll shut up now


therealbovine


Jan 3, 2004, 8:38 AM
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Re: making a tight line (for longer set ups) cheaply [In reply to]
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Of course you can do it cheaply. Just replace the "pulleys" mentioned in other forums with one or two carabiners ( two allows for a larger pulling radius with less bend in the rope). Replace the "ascenders" mentioned in other forums with a prussik. If you have access to "Freedom of the hills" or any good instructional climbing book, even some of the big wall technique and/or rescue related instructional books, you can find great 3/1 or 4/1 pully systems in which you can use the above mentioned options to replace the expensive equipment. Best of luck!


Partner slacklinejoe


Jan 3, 2004, 9:58 AM
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Re: making a tight line (for longer set ups) cheaply [In reply to]
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Just out of curiosity how long of lines do you have in mind and are they highlines?

In a week or two I'm going to release a different simple yet cheap tightening system for longer lines that aren't highlines. It's the same setup I use for my 115' lines that I like very tight (I haven't went for 150' yet but I'm pretty sure it'll do it).


far_east_climber


Jan 5, 2004, 9:52 PM
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hmmm well at the moment i am just looking into long low lines maybe up to 100ft or possibly a little more... highlining will come sometime after... i was wondering if someone knows any links that could direct me into setting up the set up i'm looking for... photos on how to do this would be much appreciated


therealbovine


Jan 6, 2004, 6:54 AM
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Try this link to the Petzl Website. As I said in my last post, replace the pulleys with carabiners and the ascender with a prussik if you want to go "budget".

http://petzl.com/petzl/ProConseils?MotRecherche=Quick+Search&Langue=en&Activite=23&Famille=12&Conseil=&Produit=

Click on the "pulley system w/ handle".

If the link does not work, go to petzl.com, then site map, then under wprk solutions go to rigging, then to rescue hauling system simulator, then to pulley system with handle. (in this diagram the weight would represent your slackline).

This system will work for a 100' line. just start with approx. 10' between the end of your slackline and the anchor.

Best of Luck!


japhyr


Jan 7, 2004, 12:51 AM
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In that diagram on the petzl site, you don't need that last pulley. It merely provides a change of direction, and if you replace that with a carabiner, you'll just be adding a significant amount of unnecessary friction.

I was also thinking you could leave the prusik out and just clove hitch the biner into the line. In rescue work you use a prusik so you can reset the pulling point, but this will not be necessary in tensioning a slackline. Does that sound right?


far_east_climber


Jan 7, 2004, 4:02 AM
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hmmm, ok i gave myself a shot at the set up from the petzl link.. but i don't really understand how to tighten it... you know the bit that comes out of the final pulley (that you click with your mouse to pull) how does that operate... also, where do i clip in the loose bit of rope that makes up the prussik loop on my ascender? any photos or anything that i could copy a set up from?


david.yount
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Jan 9, 2004, 6:22 PM
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The end of the rope that comes out of the final pulley on the petzl website (with the large arrow on it that you can click and drag with your mouse) is where you grab with both hands and pull. As you pull on that loose end the slackline is tightened. You pull on this rope to tighten the slackline.

The final pulley on the petzl website is not used for slacklines. If you use this tightening system do not use the third pulley. You will pull on the rope to tighten the slackline and you will be pulling away from the slackline, you will be pulling toward the tree (or other anchor).

Pulleys work very very well. But if you do not have pulleys and want to do it very cheap, then you can replace the each pulley with a carabiner. When the rope goes around a pulley a little extra friction is created. When the rope goes around a carabiner a lot extra friction is created. Using carabiners saves money, it's very cheap but you will have to pull much harder to tighten your slackline. If you replace each pulley with two carabiners it might be less friction than replacing each pulley with just one carabiner.

The petzl website shows a mechanical ascender attached to the main rope near the load. You can replace the ascender with a friction hitch. You mentioned a French Prusik, that is a friction hitch. I'm not convinced many people understand precisely what a French Prusik hitch looks like. A French Prusik is what most people use as a rappel back-up attached to their leg loop. Often this rappel back-up 'knot' is called an autoblock.

Besides the French Prusik hitch, other hitches include Klemheist, Hedden and Prusik. These are all hitches. Let's all begin to spell the man's name correctly, eh? Prusik, as in Dr. Karl Prusik. Drop the extra "s" and don't finish his fine name with a "c" instead of a "k". And then we can tackle the Klemheist hitch, drop that extra "i", Klemheist has only one "i"

http://www.climbing.ie/knots.html
(but they misspelled Klemheist)

The second pulley on the petzl website can be attached to the main rope with a mechanical ascender or any friction hitch. If you want a friction hitch that is easiest to move while under full load that would be the French Prusik, or Autoblock. A Bachman could also be employed.

But it's faster and easier if you attach the second pulley directly to the load, the end of the slackline. There's no reason to construct a hitch to attach the second pulley (or substituting 1 or 2 carabiners) to the main rope. The second pulley can be rigged directly to the end of the slackline.

--David.


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