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timpanogos


Mar 20, 2004, 9:54 PM
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It helped.
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Well I finished the first read through of the book during the week. I was able to utilize a few of the things from the book today.

First, my attitude going to the climb today was different – I choose my route but went with the only intention of enjoying and concentrating on learning, prepared for hitting the top – but no goals.

I found myself in a very solid a3 situation (which I’m trying to learn/move into), first thing the conscience mind kicks in – dang looking featureless my crack fizzed out on small stuff and the next c1 is two moves out – I WISH the crack keep going – I caught that one – soften eyes look for solutions – ok, hooks might work darn thin stuff – I WISH they were more positive hooking edges – caught that again – time to move back a phase.

Analyze where you are at (standing on an old fixed #1ish brassy, which is over a rivet) – risk is a bit high here – I down climb a bit and put my rivet hanger back on the rivet and clip it to the led. I work a #4 brassy into a fair placement and put a screamer on it and get back up on the fixed #1. I reanalyze the fall, the #4 with the screamer would likely hold, the rivet hanger was medium in size – another 4kn type piece on a solid rivet – it would likely hold, the bolt below that would definitely hold but ground fall with led stretch was starting to push it – was I willing to climb to fall? I made the decision and went for it.

I ended up on a talon hook move. When I synched up to the hook – it was a timebomb – I wish I had my other talon! Caught that again, ok what do you have – lets try that smallest chiseled lepper hook. I feel around for a promishing edge, find a possible one and give it a try, it blows, and I’m still there! I try another edge, same thing. This looks bad – stop – back to solutions, I try a third ledge, feels way solid, and it’s time to move, not going to get away with this much longer, so trusting I shift onto it, and the talon drops. I synch up to the second hook and can now hookup to a C1 placement. Welcome back conscience mind, talk all you want now – it didn’t have much to say at that point.

I was actually very calm in a high odds of popping position. I think it was the analysis and making the decision, yes, I will risk this fall – so don’t fret it any more, go - that helped with the calm – I was able to watch for any thoughts of fear/stress and dismiss them – you’ve already checked it out, it’s good to go.

The action phase with aid is interesting, in that when you “flow” it’s a bit more of a logical mind – conscience analysis – that requires a sequence of steps that require thinking – analyze features, select piece, test, pass/fail, select/test more, commit, clean previous, clip in, suck up to new piece – repeat. There is some muscle memory that does kick in, but many conscience choices are continually being made. The cool part is when the undesirable conscience thoughts are calm and the analysis/action thoughts are flowing.

Fun day.


dredsovrn


Apr 1, 2004, 11:10 AM
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Congrats. I think it is a process that you never stop working on and refining. I know it has made a big difference for me.


dirtineye


Apr 2, 2004, 5:34 AM
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That is interesting that you have applied RWW to aid climbing. All the aid I have done is pretty relaxed, but I can see now how the trickier stuff could wear on you the same way as hard free climbing.


iamthewallress


Apr 2, 2004, 10:38 AM
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I'll toss out some things that I've felt like I've learned through this process as I've been thinking about them a lot in the context of another discussion that has been going on with Chad in the Aid forum. Chad, even though some of the topics are things that we were talking about elsewhere, pls just take them at face value and with respect to my own journey. We may have been swapping flames in the Aid forum, but I am honestly not trying to drag that over here....

In reply to:
That is interesting that you have applied RWW to aid climbing. All the aid I have done is pretty relaxed, but I can see now how the trickier stuff could wear on you the same way as hard free climbing.

If aid always seemed relaxed, then you obviously weren't getting outside of your comfort zone. Just like the guy who posted a while back about always eating his lunch outside no matter what the weather, we can use warrior principles to expand our comfort zone in any aspect of life. That comment by the lunch guy has been one of the more useful ones that I've picked up from this forum, and I think applying the warrior mentality whenever I can helps me do it better when the sh!t is hitting the fan on some climb.

One of the big ways in which the WW has helped me is by getting more honest with myself (dang, I sound like Dr. Phil) about the way ego twists my motivations or rationalizations about my climbing. I'm more accepting of backing off now when I feel like something is too risky, so I don't end up wasting energy being pissed off about backing off on the previous climb when I step up to the next one...Kinda helps me focus on the present more.

I also don't beat myself up for turning over a lead that is objectively too hard for me at that moment or let my ego stop me from taking the opportunity to learn from a more experienced climber on routes where I won't be able to share leads, although in the past I wasn't able to fully accept these as potentially great experiences. Instead, once I've agreed to a particular experience, I give myself fully (or as fully as possible) to be the best partner that I can be.

I have less craving to be two steps ahead of where I am on my journey right now, and am more focused on what I can do to be the best I can be at the level where I am at now.

I talk about my projects with others less than I used to, and it helps keep me focused on climbing for the sake of enjoying the climbing vs. the positive or negative recognition that I'll get from others depending on the outcome.

More than getting bolder, the WW principles have helped me feel less of a requirement to be a bold as I can possibly imagine being. My attitude with respect to being bold in the past has often been some combination of wishing behavior and unproductive action, and it was typically more motivated by ego than an honest attempt at personal growth. It may seem ironic, but letting go of the idea that I need to go best myself every time I walk out the door (detachment from outcome and focus on process?) has helped me to climb harder than ever and with a larger zone of comfort than I've felt in ages or possibly ever. Most importanly, climbing is more fun than I can remember it ever being.


dirtineye


Apr 3, 2004, 10:29 PM
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wallress, I only aid to get to fre climbing LOL, and I meant exwactly what I said, relaxed. hanging on gear is not veryt stressful to me when you are placing real pieces, not bashies and tuff like that.

But I can see that if your whole climb were on a4 or 5 stuff, then it woudl be tough. That was my point.

Since I really don't do much climbing over suspect gear adn I ahve had a lot of afalling training nad experience, I really don't ever get muhc out of my comfort zone.

In fact, haveing had cancer twice, I'd say that for me climbing has very little chance to put me out of my comfort zone haha.

I'm planning a trip to a free climb face FA that will have a possible 60 foot fall, and I'm looing forward to it, because I know that with a good anchor in the last horisontal there is no way to get hurt. A little air time never hurt anyone.


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