Forums: Climbing Disciplines: Bouldering:
Building Footwork Technique
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Bouldering

Premier Sponsor:

 


witcomb


May 23, 2004, 2:25 PM
Post #1 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 23, 2004
Posts: 28

Building Footwork Technique
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Ok, quick background. I've been climbing for 3-4 months now, bouldering only. I am able to climb V0-V2 comfortably and challenge V3-V5.

I know for a fact that my footwork sucks. When doing harder routes where you must be creative with your footwork I will often just use strength to get me through.

Beyond the normal responses of, watch others, ask an experienced person to critic, etc. Is there any specific drills which I can do to help my footwork? I do try climbing easy routes where I concentrate on my feet, moving silently and deliberatly. This works, but it doesn't get me to think creatively.

So, are there any other good footwork drills which I can do?

Thanks


anothertucsonclimber


May 23, 2004, 2:36 PM
Post #2 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 2, 2003
Posts: 149

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

When bouldering at your gym, just use the jibs for feet. No tracking, no open feet.


stupidboulderer


May 23, 2004, 10:00 PM
Post #3 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 11, 2004
Posts: 80

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Climbing in gyms doesn't help footwork that much because you are shown where to place your feet-along with your hands of course. If you climb on real rock you are forced to find the right foot positions for your body. Just keep practicing.


curt


May 23, 2004, 10:04 PM
Post #4 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 26, 2002
Posts: 18272

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Climb some slabs. To be a good low angle face climber, you must develop good footwork or you will fail. So, start out on 5.7 or 5.8 slab climbs and work your way up. When you are doing 5.11 slab climbs, I guarantee you will have good footwork. And, that footwork will carry over to other types of climbing too.

Curt


les


May 23, 2004, 10:15 PM
Post #5 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 29, 2003
Posts: 41

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Traverse. Get on a long boulder and traverse it. Moving laterally on the rock makes you think 20 times more about your feet. It teaches you how to keep your weight off your hands and on your feet. Crossing through, switching out, flagging, back stepping, drop kneeing, and other things are techniques you can practice while traversing. They all help while climbing difficult problems too. Drop kneeing is especially helpful when doing long, static moves on steep, overhanging rock.


tech_dog


May 23, 2004, 10:22 PM
Post #6 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 13, 2004
Posts: 224

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I think I'd be better if I edged less and smeared more.

Any words of wisdom from the 5.14 climbers?


andy_reagan


May 24, 2004, 5:47 AM
Post #7 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 1075

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I'm not a 5.14 climber but I will answer anyway...

climb on as much real rock as possible. This goes for types (sandstone, granite, lime, etc) and for angles (roof, slab, etc). I think the more situations you put your body in on real rock the more times you have to learn from success and failure. Also going to new areas works on other important skills, like onsighting...


lostcause


May 24, 2004, 5:54 AM
Post #8 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 22, 2004
Posts: 118

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

First I'm not an overly strong boulderer and am having similar problems as the original post. I've been working on my footwork lately also and have a theory that I'm working with now. First since it is boudering that I seem to have the most trouble with my footwork (I do pretty good with footwork on vericle and slabs leaning in), I'm concentrating on improving in overhanging and steep angle situations. My theory is that I could greatly improve this by increasing my core body strength more. I've been toying with Pilates to help with this. Anyone have any comments on this? Does it sound reasonable?


climbingfreak


May 24, 2004, 11:33 AM
Post #9 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 10, 2004
Posts: 65

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Shoudn't this be in Training and Technique? Take an Intro to Movement class or an Intro to Bouldering Class most likely offered at your gym.


fenix83
Moderator

May 24, 2004, 11:38 AM
Post #10 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 22, 2004
Posts: 2397

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
Traverse. Get on a long boulder and traverse it. Moving laterally on the rock makes you think 20 times more about your feet.

That really helped me a lot, the other thing that makes you think about your footwork a lot more is to downclimb.


witcomb


May 24, 2004, 1:45 PM
Post #11 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 23, 2004
Posts: 28

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Thanks, I'll try spending more time on downclimbing and traversing. I've also seen climbing without hands on slabs to be good and that seems to make good sense. Is it possible to do this no-hand climbing on vertical walls? It seems like it would be very difficult if possible.

I would take a coarse at the local gym, but they don't really have many people who would be qualified to give such a coarse.

Thanks for the advice


okcdirtbag


May 24, 2004, 1:58 PM
Post #12 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 7, 2003
Posts: 65

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

you mentioned leaning in on slabs.. from personal experience not always a good thing.. i've found from the wonderful granite of oklahoma to keep yer ass over yer feet! improves friction since gravity is pullin your body weight downwards instead of at an angle off the rock.. if that makes any sense..


scuclimber


May 24, 2004, 11:05 PM
Post #13 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 30, 2003
Posts: 1007

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Climb in Yosemite. The footholds are this big (points at his smallest toe). :wink: Seriously though, I found that when I went back to the gym after a couple successive weekends climbing outside (Castle Rock SP, Pinnacles NM, and Yosemite) my footwork had improved tremendously. Finding solid footholds outside is far more challenging than inside.

Colin


peroxide


May 25, 2004, 1:34 AM
Post #14 of 14 (2450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 3, 2004
Posts: 117

Re: Building Footwork Technique [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I am/was in the same boat. When I feel my feet taking a backseat to power I do the following:

IN THE GYM (with tectured walls): Take a route a grade or two below your limit. Now climb with only hands in the set holds and feet only on the wall (or jibs if the walls are not textured panels)

IN THE GYM: Take a slab route and allow yourself a set number of handholds. Add handholds until you can climb the route (feet only on wall, not on any holds). Then subtract 1 handhold, repeat. Subtract 2 handhold, repeat. You force dependancy on your feet and balance. I did this for a week and was a different person when I got back to my vert and overhang routes.

ON ROCK: Listen to Curt. Go climb slabs. It takes discipline since most routes hold cheesegrade potential and take time to master. After you send your first 10b slab in good form you will have a cool head and respect slab masters 100x more. At my local crag there are several 10-11s slab climbs that when done on lead take mad control and gain unending respect from the locals. Clean your shoes before heading up...always.

ON ROCK 2: If you have boulder problems that are slightly slabby you can play the one arm game. Take a route you can do with small foot holds and use only one arm. Switch and repeat. When teaching new people how to climb one of the first day requirements is climbing a slab, and taking a no hands rest focusing on balance etc. then I remove one arm. All that talk about feet being important blah blah blah becomes immediately obvious.

Good luck,
P :idea:


Forums : Climbing Disciplines : Bouldering

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook