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climber_trev


Apr 24, 2002, 3:13 AM
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Dynamic and fast
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hi just a general sort of question, i've been climbing for just on two years now and i was introduced to climbing (and tutored) by one guy who i have based my climbing style on. the thing is I almost never dyno all of my movements are slow and controled, which of course takes energy. At the moment i'm trying to change this but i'm finding it difficult to break habits (note i can when bouldering and indoor climbing)it's starting to hinder my progress now as i'm getting into the high 5.11 and am aware of the nesessity of these abilities at this stage.

any hints?

thanks
climber_trev


mauta


Apr 24, 2002, 6:24 AM
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In my opinion, avoiding dynamic movements led to a more elegant climbing style.
Of course, in some cases a dyno is the only way to go...
But, i insist that, whenever it is possible, i prefer to avoid them.

JUAN


vaness


Apr 24, 2002, 6:51 AM
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i never dyno
and if i do its because the hold is an inch out of my longest reach
using technique is muck better then a dyno that isnt nessasary


mountainrat


Apr 24, 2002, 7:18 AM
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I often try routes that I can't send without being fluid- legs pushing, arms guiding and pulling, and following through- it jusat takes too much energy to make these moves more "statically," if that is a word That is what I'm working on at the moment as well.


dynamic


Apr 24, 2002, 7:22 AM
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Crap and I have a tendency to get crapped on...


dogen


Apr 24, 2002, 7:46 AM
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i used to be the same way, i developed a very static fluid technique by doing a lot of face climbing. as i started working routes/problems that were very steep or had huge roofs i had to develop a more dynamic style so i could move faster and conserve energy. a good way to develop your dynamic movement is to find an easy boulder and start eliminating holds so that you either have to dead point or full out dyno past the hold you're trying to skip. this technique worked pretty well for me, good luck.


miagi


Apr 24, 2002, 9:02 AM
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Personally I think your on a very good path. Sometimes, people who dyno and use momentum instead of strength, lack the muscle power to do controlled static moves. Right now you have the strength and you can combine it with dynos and pull off some nice routes.
Some tips for dynoing:
1. Most of the challenge is MENTAL. That you will have to accomplish yourself. The best way for me to learn dynoing was on boulder problems. You can try over and over again without large falls. After that, try dynoing on routes.
2. Breath and focus. Dont overshoot and try to nail it right on the head. You have to be psyched. Burst out with all the engery you have and never back off once your have begun to execute it.
3. Stagger your feet for better positioning
4. Sometimes swinging to gain momentum for the dyno works to get that extra inch of reach.

5. For the more experienced person who dyno's, some people do a double dyno or "run up the rock". You stagger one foot, jump, place your other foot on a higher edge, and dyno again. I have only done this a few times, and its very scary. I only suggest this for you to keep in mind once you have practiced dynoing alot.


climber_trev


Apr 24, 2002, 8:03 PM
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thanks for the advice boys and girls!

it's good to see some people who still would rather climb statically than full on dynamically. Some of the guy's at the local crag do everything dynamical (in some cases even putting on their shoes) to me all of this seems a little overboard. They often say to me why do you do everything statically try some dynos 'if you climbed dynamically you'd find it easy as', but when i watch them climb its some of the ugliest action i've ever seen (although when used effectivly i've seen some pretty impressive moves done).

thanks again for the input
climber_trev


phreakdigital


Apr 24, 2002, 8:57 PM
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I usually dont dyno on routes...but sometimes I look for them, but not really as part of trying to make it up a route. Fall back (no pun intented ) on your technique.


rockjunkie


Apr 25, 2002, 8:26 PM
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I must say that I agree with miagi. I would stress climbing more with your mind- finding ways to get around high-energy moves rather than trying to muscle your way through them. Although on the other hand, someone said that it was ugly to climb "dynamically"- who cares what it looks like? If you need something to work and a dyno will do the trick- by all means, by all means.

Peace

~tommy


qacwac


Apr 25, 2002, 8:43 PM
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I don't know if you can still get it but under ProTips on climbxmedia there is "dynos 101" with Mike Auldridge. It's pretty inspiring. I watched it when I first started and so I've always loved dynoing.


miagi


Apr 25, 2002, 9:09 PM
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One more thing I failed to mention were "bumping off an intermediate" moves. I call them "tic tac" moves. It is where there is a small hold which might be too small to dyno but is out of a static reach. If there are small holds inbetween, you do small deadpoints up the small holds to the hold you want. It works really well and I have used it alot.

Personally I love dynoing. It looks so amazing when someone pulls off a huge dyno. It's like an art


crazeeclimber


May 1, 2002, 4:54 AM
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Well, I am a fluent climber, I dyno only if it absolutely necessary to reach a hold (as I'm only 5'3!) But technique is definately the way to go, rather be jumping jerkily up the wall, you could also injure your self or even risk a greater fall. But climbing with momentum and fluent weight change will use less energy and get you to the top!
Keep climbing


climber_trev


May 1, 2002, 3:34 PM
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Thanks for the supportive words Lydia, and no i wont stop climbing, i know you just said that cause you want to come up to Brisbane and use me as your guide / climbing slave!

im down with that!

Peace
climber_trev


cory


May 1, 2002, 4:09 PM
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I can't believe y'all are raggin' on dynoing so much. It's no less a good technique than is a smooth, static move. Good technique is that which allows you to clip the chains, and oftentimes that includes dynoing. Do the best climbers dyno? Hell ya, they do.


metoliusmunchkin


May 8, 2002, 2:36 PM
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Yes, dynos do utilize the effects of momentum rather than strength to in all actually have the ability to pull off certain moves. However, whilst climbing any very hard climb, where one does not acquire the amount of strength needed to accomplish a particular move, one must then turn to momentum.

This does not necessarily suggest that dynoing is the only solution to a 'lack of strength' barrier, though only shedding light upon the fact that momentum can greatly aid you in overcoming those particularly hard moves.

A good example of such a utilization of momentum would be found within the use of a rose move. Now, for those of you who do not necessarily know what a rose moves is, it is when reaching across and underneath your opposite hand, and thus grabbing another hold; you are then found in a position where your back is facing the wall rather than your front.

It is when you complete the rose move, that you allow yourself to barn door (allow the momentum gathered by the rose move, to swiftly carry you across the face of the rock/wall) and consequently achieve the next fundamental move.

Personally, I myself am a very fluent climber, as I believe that the key to saving energy while climbing, can be tremendously achieved in one's own fluency, found in technique.

Moreover, finding it best to perform each and every manoeuver with great fluency and grace - as well as maintaining a static basis; I still believe that the utilisation of certain dynamic movements in order to overcome personal cruxes be the best fashion of energy conservation.

To sum up


Fluency while climbing greatly conserves energy, though can sometimes require more of a strength factor

When performing a move statically, one must definitely turn to a more dynamic manoeuver for optimum energy conservation

The use of momentum is in fact the greatest way of avoiding using strength, and overcoming personal cruxes. In properly utilising the "momentum's on your side" technique in completing such moves as the rose move as well as properly barn dooring you can also increase your energy conservation ratio


That's 'bout it!


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