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gary8354


Aug 15, 2001, 11:07 AM
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Carbo , Carbo Carbo
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During training (running, lifting, ect) how much carbohydrate (grams)is needed. I heard anywhere from 40 - 60% of calories.


jds100


Aug 15, 2001, 9:05 PM
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Zoostation: I've never heard that the author of The Zone made the claims you state; I do know that there are a lot of fitness trainers and successful athletes of varying degrees of "intensity" that have had good results from following The Zone's fairly simple ideas about insulin control. Another sports nutritionist, who is a doctor (last name Colgan), writes about similar control of insulin as being key to energy as well as fat loss.

I think plenty of quackery can be found in the Atkins diet books. Dangerous!!!

I've read quite a bit on sports nutrition, and there is a consistent thread running through them, about more-but-smaller meals per day, low glycemic-index carbohydrates, chromium piccolinate as a supplement, increasing soluble fiber, and getting the right amount of the right kind of protein. You could read a ton (check Eric Horst's bibliography for his books Flash Training and How to Climb 5.12; there's a lot from Human Kinetics and the Uiversity of Illinois), but I think The Zone has a proven track record, and it's safe and simple. If the ideas in it don't produce results for you, try somethng else, but I bet you'll find it sensible and effective.


marcsv


Aug 15, 2001, 10:01 PM
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sorry gary carbo loading never worked for me i switched to high protein and fiber


gary8354


Aug 16, 2001, 3:51 AM
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Damn people, I was not expecting a 3 page report with quotes and graphs.


jds100


Aug 16, 2001, 6:52 PM
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zoostation: Thanks for the in-depth info on Sears and The Zone. I admit that I don't recall the specific bizarre claims and quotes that you cite, but I didn't do a close read of every chapter of The Zone, and the '99 follow up book (Zone Perfection, I think). I certainly do not have the exposure that you do to the articles and other sources, but when I get time I will search the Net for more.

I don't look at The Zone or any other "diet" for weight loss purposes; rather, for sports performance nutrition. I know I've seen in many sources that fat, in the form of olive oil, for one example, is desirable and necessary. I didn't understand The Zone to be a carb-heavy, or anti-carb, or protien-heavy, etc. etc. diet. I though it was advocating a balance between the three sources of calories: fat (in the form of healthy vegetable oils), carbohydrates, and protein. I also didn't notice him trashing vegetarians. I will have to re-read the two books, more closely.

I guess the thing I've taken away from the reading I've done on sports nutrition is the concept of balance between the three calorie groups, and soluble fiber. I started with this idea after reading James Colgan's book Optimum Sports Nutrition (sifting out the extraneous chaff), and I've seen it in a few smaller sources, such as a chapter in a training book, and magazine articles. My personal experience is that high glycemic index carbohydrates cause me to crash BIG TIME about 10-20 minutes after eating them, and excessive protein causes me to plateau in growth and slow my rate of progress in training. Balance in diet works great for me, eating the right kind of meals and "snacks" consistently spaced through the day (plus plenty of water). My energy stays consistent; I don't develop "road rage" driving home, I don't go brain dead in the afternoon, or start yawning in the late morning.

Carbo-loading makes no sense to me in climbing, since it's much more of a power-endurance activity, than an endurance (e.g. distance running) activity.

I know Atkins' bullshit is just that, and it's potentially dangerous. I know I read an article a few months ago where the researcher found that ANY diet will produce weight loss as a naturally occurring adaptive reaction to change in diet -ANY diet! So all these people that claim great fast results from the newest rage (or in the case of Atkins, a recycled rage) are in for a rude awakening some weeks and months down the line. Just like with weight lifting, the newby will see an incredibly fast increase in strength within the first two weeks, or so, but that's just the body adapting to its use of the muscles in a way it has not been accustomed to up to the beginning of the workout period. That's why cyclic periodization is effective in weight training, as well as in climbing training; it effectively wakes up the body from adapting to the same level of intensity and routine, so the athlete avoids plateaus.

Anyway, I'd appreciate some specific websites and/or print sources to check into for more info on The Zone and Sears. Feel free to leave them for me in a Private Message on this site, or email me when it's convenient. Thanks.


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