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Comfort falls?
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alpinerock


Aug 24, 2004, 5:32 PM
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Comfort falls?
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I have noticed that latley when i've been attempting a hard red-point, rather than trying to make a move that i've failed on before i'll take the fall, i believe this is becasue making the move pushes my comfort zone, but even with this personal revelation i can't seem to break the process. Any one have the same problem? how did you overcome it?


jt512


Aug 24, 2004, 5:57 PM
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Re: Comfort falls? [In reply to]
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I have noticed that latley when i've been attempting a hard red-point, rather than trying to make a move that i've failed on before i'll take the fall, i believe this is becasue making the move pushes my comfort zone, but even with this personal revelation i can't seem to break the process. Any one have the same problem? how did you overcome it?

Go back to the basic WW process:

1. Observe your state of mind. Are you nervous, tense?.

2. Center. Breath deeply. Work the tension out. Relax. Smile.

3. Objectively evaluate the risk. Where will you land if you fall? How will you land? Good body position? Awkward body position? Will you be injured? Do you have experience with falls like this? Can you handle them safely?

4. Focus on possibilities. Review your beta.

5. If the risk is reasonable for you, then commit to it fully. Set the intention to climb through the risk, or fall (I mean really fall, not let go). Like Arno says: Don't go until you're ready; but when you go, GO.

6. Trust the process. You already determined that the fall was ok, so trust your judgment. I find it helpful to say "trust" to myself before making a scary move.

7. Climb continuously, and breath deeply and rhytmically. I find that breathing in this manner really helps keep me in the moment. I start breathing like this before entering the risk.

If you're afraid of the fall, ask yourself why? It may be a lack of experience with falls of that length or type (off to the side, weird body position, etc.). If so, then work up toward practicing that type of fall, until you are either confident that you can take the fall safely, or you know for a fact that it is dangerous.

-Jay


dirtineye


Aug 27, 2004, 10:48 AM
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Re: Comfort falls? [In reply to]
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I don't see why you'd rather take the fall than try to make the move and not fall, do you?

How is falling more in your comfort zone than making the move?

If it were a choice of downclimbing or trying the move and risking a fall, I would understand that.


jt512


Aug 27, 2004, 11:10 AM
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I don't see why you'd rather take the fall than try to make the move and not fall, do you?

How is falling more in your comfort zone than making the move?

I think I know what he means because I think I do the same thing. He's facing a choice between taking a controlled fall, which he's comfortable with, versus making a hard move and taking a longer fall over which he feels he has less control. The fear of the longer fall may have a seen of rationality. For instance, the hard move may put him in a less than ideal body position to fall from. Usually, though, it just feels that way, and the fall isn't as dangerous as it feels.

-Jay


alpinerock


Aug 28, 2004, 12:31 PM
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I don't see why you'd rather take the fall than try to make the move and not fall, do you?

How is falling more in your comfort zone than making the move?

I think I know what he means because I think I do the same thing. He's facing a choice between taking a controlled fall, which he's comfortable with, versus making a hard move and taking a longer fall over which he feels he has less control. The fear of the longer fall may have a seen of rationality. For instance, the hard move may put him in a less than ideal body position to fall from. Usually, though, it just feels that way, and the fall isn't as dangerous as it feels.

-Jay

I think Jay nailed it, the fall usually ends up being a lot more scary than it is dangerous.


jt512


Aug 29, 2004, 9:44 AM
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In reply to:
In reply to:
I don't see why you'd rather take the fall than try to make the move and not fall, do you?

How is falling more in your comfort zone than making the move?

I think I know what he means because I think I do the same thing. He's facing a choice between taking a controlled fall, which he's comfortable with, versus making a hard move and taking a longer fall over which he feels he has less control. The fear of the longer fall may have a seen of rationality. For instance, the hard move may put him in a less than ideal body position to fall from. Usually, though, it just feels that way, and the fall isn't as dangerous as it feels.

-Jay

I think Jay nailed it, the fall usually ends up being a lot more scary than it is dangerous.

The potential falls that feel scary to me are ones where I'm not facing the wall and/or am doing powerful lieback-like moves where I'll spring out from the wall if I fall. I find it helps to have a properly trained belayer who you trust will have enough slack in the rope and will give you a dynamic belay.

I'm trying to learn to take body position into account in the "Accept" phase. I try to evaluate not only the fall distance, but to visualize what my body postition will be when I fall, so that I'm not surprised when I get into that position. Also, when I find a move scary, I've started using the keyword "trust" to remind myself that I've already evaluated the risk and decided that it was ok, and to trust in the process (and the belayer).

-Jay


dirtineye


Aug 29, 2004, 12:21 PM
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I've fallen out of 'bad body position" several tines, and thanks to the good choce of climb, and having good belayers, had nothing to worry about hitting immediately, and was able to adjust during the resulting pendulum to hit the wall with my feet first adn absorb the impact properly.

Training and attitude have a lot to do with falling successfully. You have to react very quickly and correctly. There is no time to be afraid during the fall. there is only time to do the right or wrong thing. If yo ure paycing yourself out before you are falling, re-read all the RWW stuff the pretains to this. Include the fall consequences assessment pages.


dredsovrn


Sep 11, 2004, 6:57 AM
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I had talked about doing some practice falls to get past this point, but never really did. Using the RWW method of realisticly rating the fall consequence and then committing 100% definitely helps, but can be challenging to apply.

I started making progress when my climbing partner was stuck at a crux section of .12a. He was two three bolts up, and there was only one more bolt and then shuts to the top. This climb was way out of my lead league. After he lowered off, he suggested I give it a shot.

I figured I was TR'ing it so why not. After a few falls, I had worked my way up to the third bolt. I rested and tried to figure out what I would do. I kept trying it the way I saw him do it, and that had me falling withing a foot of the bolt. No big deal. Not much more falling than leaning over. I kept pushing a little further each time. Eventually falling up to 5'. Not exactly a whipper, but I had stopped thinking about the falling, and started focusing on the moves.

It occured to me (after about 8 of these short falls) that there might be a different way. I made some adjustments, and stuck the move. The climbing was sustained .11 after that, and fire ants were running now running down my arm (bonus factor on this climb). I actually yelled to my partner," fire ants!" He yelled, "climb!"

I was quickly to the next bolt and then making moves for the shuts. I was pumped. I hadn't intended to take practice falls, but that is what I essentially did. I didn't include the grade to impress anyone, but to illustrate the mental restrictions we put on ourselves. Previously to this climb my hardest lead was a .8. I had TR'd much higher, but leading the crux of a .12 wasn't even possible in my mind.

I learned two things. I knew I was supposed to know the fall consequence and commit, but putting it into practice made it real. Additionally it reinforced keeping an open mind. Recently, trying to push my onsight limit, I got sloppy with my feet on a 95 degree day took a 20' fall. I regularly judged the fall consequence and kept climbing. I was suprised to find myself hanging 20' below where I was a few seconds ago. I was really focused.

Hope this helps. Enjoy the journey.


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