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Twist in a rope
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genlock


May 18, 2002, 3:03 PM
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Twist in a rope
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I climbed the other in a mall, they have walls with a few routes on it (top rope). The employee, who belays everyone is not anchored to anything. I saw him twisting the rope and asked why, he said that with 2 twist, it would decrease my weight by a bit more than half.

Is this true?


- Genlock


mauta


May 18, 2002, 4:01 PM
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I am a little confused by your post...

First of all, when you are belaying FROM THE GROUND, there is USUALLY no need to anchor yourself (of course, there are exeptions, like if you are belaying a leader that outweights you by much, for instance).
On the other hand, i do not understand what do you mean by "2 twists on the rope"...What belaying method/device was he using? can you be more explicit?

JUAN


miagi


May 18, 2002, 4:06 PM
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I really dont have any factual information to back me up, but I think he is flat out lying. Two twists in the rope cutting the force by "HALF"? I think twisting the rope is simply twisting the rope, nothing more; It might kink the rope or tighten the strands, but the same shock loads are subject to the belayer.

If anyone has a different answer, it would be interesting


genlock


May 18, 2002, 5:14 PM
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One of the gyms I go to have their belay device (grigri) anchored to the floor with rope, link and bolts so anyone could belay a 250 pounds man without being lifted up in the air. That's what I meant by anchor...my bad..

I'm 6' and weight 200pounds ( I know, a bit heavy compared to an average climber...) The clerk (aka Belayer) was about 5'5 or 5'6 and about 140pounds. He told me that with the 2 twists would decrease up to twice my weight (he said 90pounds) thus forcing less and less likely to be pulled up.

btw.. he's using a grigri too.

- Genlock

[ This Message was edited by: genlock on 2002-05-18 17:15 ]


tenn_dawg


May 18, 2002, 6:16 PM
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By "Twists", do you mean that he rotates the two ends of the rope, (the belay end, and the climbing end) around each other.

For example... From the ground you would look up to the TR anchors, and see the ropes twisted around each other a couple of times just below the anchors?

If this is the case, then i've got a little beta. It has been my experience that doing this does add friction to the system, but it is a poor way to do so. It contributes to rope wear, and makes belaying more difficult. I personally feel that this is not a good substution for anchoring to the ground.

It sounds like the guy belaying is being a little lazy, and dosen't want to anchor in. If it was me belaying a much heavier partner, I would anchor in, rather than doing what this guy does. I dont believe there is anything unsafe about it though. Just sounds like a lazy technique. But can you blame the guy? Whew, what a boring job.
Travis


miagi


May 18, 2002, 9:04 PM
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It's not even that much of a hastle. One daisy chain anchor with a biner at the end; Clip and go....your done!

If tenndawg is right, then this guy should be doing something different. If he is twisting the two strands, it would make belaying alot more difficult when trying to pull up the slack. I don't think it's a real health hazard, but there is a better method. Like I said, what difference does one extra biner clip make?


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